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Shay Locomotives: Ephraim Shay's Classic Geared Design

Last revised: December 15, 2023

By: Adam Burns

The Shay steam locomotive, a gear-driven steam locomotive developed by Ephraim Shay, revolutionized the logging industry and transformed the way heavy loads were transported across difficult terrains.

The development of this locomotive is not only a tale of engineering innovation but also a reflection of the demands of a burgeoning industrial America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The Shay was the most well-known and widely used of the geared designs with 2,767 constructed from 1878 through 1945.  Part of the design's successful was due to Shay's partnership with the Lima Locomotive Works, which built the entirety of the Shay catalog.  

Interestingly, when Shay's patent expired, the the Willamette Iron & Steel Works of Portland, Oregon picked up the design and introduced its own Shay-inspired variant, the Willamette locomotive. 

Ultimately, only 33 were produced between November, 1922 and December, 1929. Today, 115 Shays are known to be preserved while 18 others are operational at various tourist railroads.

Photos

Efjloj7WAAIL0H8.jpgFeather River Railway 3-truck #3 leads a string of empty boxcars over the South Fork Trestle spanning the Feather River as it heads for the mill at Feather Falls, California on October 23, 1959. C.G. Heimerdinger, Jr. photo.

History

The invention of the Shay locomotive dates back to the 1870s when Ephraim Shay, a logger, and inventor from Michigan, found traditional locomotives inadequate for the steep, uneven tracks of logging and mining railroads.

His experience in the logging field highlighted the need for a more robust and maneuverable form of locomotion that could handle sharp curves and steep gradients more effectively than the conventional rod-driven steam locomotives of the time.

As early as 1872 he began development of a new locomotive that used gears rather than standard rods to propel the device forward.

He built the design from the ground up using a flatcar as a base. Upon this he placed a boiler, vertical cylinders, and two-axle trucks on each end where one was rigidly mounted and the other (front) could swivel.

After much further experimentation Shay finally came up with a setup he found practical; in later designs both trucks were allowed to freely swivel.

Top Speed

How geared steam locomotives work, according to William E. Warden in his book West Virginia Logging Railroads, is that these cylinders:

"...drive a flexible line shaft with universal couplings and slip joints through bevel gears."

Essentially this means the vertical cylinders drive a horizontal crank shaft attached to drive shafts extending to each truck axle. These axles have gearboxes which propel the engine forward.

Because the Shay enjoyed power to all axles they provided excellent adhesion, enabling the negotiate grades in excess of 5%.  However, its high adhesion also limited top speed to just 18 mph. 

Cylinders

The distinctive design of the Shay positioned its cylinders directly in front of the cab, necessitating the boiler to be uniquely offset to the left. This seemingly unconventional arrangement fortuitously enhanced the locomotive’s operation by naturally counterbalancing its weight distribution.

Additionally, the innovative design granted unparalleled flexibility; each truck could navigate the track independently, ensuring that the locomotive maintained traction and stability on even the most challenging terrain.

This feature allowed the Shay to traverse nearly all types of rail conditions effectively, demonstrating a significant advancement in locomotive engineering and adaptability.

7u02034209537126352362y5899398.jpgMichigan-California Lumber Company 2-truck Shay #2 is seen here on display, circa 1981. The narrow-gauge (36 inch) locomotive was built by Lima in 1884 and operated near Camino, California. It currently resides on display at Turtle Bay Park & Museum in Redding, California. William Myers photo. American-Rails.com collection.

The design of the Shay locomotive showcased exceptional versatility, allowing it to maneuver across a myriad of track configurations, no matter how rudimentary their construction. Remarkably, this adaptability extended to the locomotive's ability to ford streams and creeks, an invaluable feature in rugged terrains lacking proper infrastructure.

This capability was particularly crucial for logging companies, which prioritized cost-effectiveness and speed in their operations. Their approach was straightforward: extract resources from a location and then swiftly relocate, reusing their rail equipment to set up new tracks in fresh logging areas. This operational method underscored the need for a locomotive that could easily adapt to swiftly laid, temporary tracks.

Content with his initial design, Ephraim Shay recognized the potential of his innovative locomotive but needed a strategic partner to bring it to the broader market.

In search of a manufacturer that could appreciate the ingenuity of his concept, Shay approached the then-small Lima Locomotive Works in Ohio during the late 1870s. This partnership would soon revolutionize the capabilities of locomotives in industrial applications, particularly in the logging industry.

Cass Scenic Railroad three-truck Shay #11 eases downgrade towards Cass as it is about to hit the Gum Crossing in October of 2008. The 103-ton unit was built for the Hutchinson Lumber Company (California) in 1923. Loyd Lowry photo.

Initially, Lima interest in Shay's concept. However, after some persuasion, they agreed to construct a prototype. This first model proved its worth when it was bought by the J. Alley Company, a lumber firm in Michigan, in 1880.

Buoyed by the success of this prototype, Shay secured a patent for his design in 1881, sparking significant interest in the industry. As the locomotive's advantages became apparent, sales began to soar.

Over the ensuing years, both Shay and Lima Locomotive Works continually refined the design, enhancing the locomotive’s weight, power, tractive effort, and adhesion capabilities.

Notable milestones included the introduction of a three-cylinder Shay locomotive in 1884 and the debut of the first three-truck Shay locomotive by Lima a year later.

Further innovation came in 1901 when Shay received a patent for an improved geared truck, marking another advancement in the design’s evolution, which solidified the locomotive’s role as a crucial asset in rugged, industrial environments.

Diagram

The evolution of the Shay over the years represents a remarkable journey in locomotive engineering. Originally, the design began modestly with the two-truck Class A model, which weighed a mere 13 tons.

However, the locomotive witnessed significant advancements. By 1903, the unveiling of the first Class D version marked a notable milestone; with four trucks, it tipped the scales at 140 tons, making it the heaviest ever built at that time. Later models even reached up to 150 tons.

Post-1920s, the design standardized somewhat, with most Shays featuring three trucks. This included one forward truck, another positioned to support the cab and firebox, and a final aft truck that supported the tender.

Each iteration was tailored to meet the increasing demands and challenges of industrial hauling, showcasing not just the adaptability but also the pioneering spirit embedded in the design of the Shay steam locomotive.

Classes

The very short table below lists the four different classes of Shays including their number of trucks and cylinders.

Class A: 2 Trucks, 2 Cylinders

Class B: 2 Trucks, 3 Cylinders

Class C: 3 Trucks, 3 Cylinders

Class D: 4 Trucks, 3 Cylinders

More than any other geared design the Shay proved the most successful, even among main line railroads where systems such as the Western Maryland, Northern Pacific, and New York Central acquired examples to handle the stiff grades of secondary branch lines.

By the time production had ended on the Shay some 2,767 examples had been built by Lima spanning a period from 1880 to 1945.

Its success launched Lima as a major locomotive builder and after the initial patent had expired a number of companies began marketing their own versions; notably the Willamette Iron & Steel Works of Portland, Oregon and Michigan Iron Works of Cadillac, Michigan.


918246234726352378643838798.jpgKlickitat Logging & Lumber Company three-truck Shay #7 leads empty log cars through the Klickitat River Canyon (Washington) on June 6, 1962. Photographer unknown. American-Rails.com collection.

Preservation

Today, 115 Shays are known to be preserved throughout the world and a number of them are still in operation. Perhaps the best place to catch these locomotives in action is at the Cass Scenic Railroad in Cass, West Virginia.

Cass Scenic (which was originally the timber operations of the West Virginia Pulp & Paper Company and Mower Lumber Company) is home to the largest collection of operating Shays in the country and is well worth the trip to ride this historic operation if you have the chance.

Other Shays still in service include a handful in California, Colorado, Washington, and the Midwest. Additionally, a few others are under restoration.

029347236523572635278689248267878.jpgKlickitat Logging & Lumber Company three-truck Shay #7 is seen here operating over the Spokane, Portland & Seattle at Goldendale, Washington on March 31, 1964. Photographer unknown. American-Rails.com collection.

Legacy

Sales of the Shay declined in the mid-20th century as road transport became more viable and widespread due to improvements in vehicle technology and road infrastructure. Additionally, the introduction of more efficient and powerful diesel locomotives also contributed to the gradual phasing out of steam-powered locomotives.

Despite declining interest, many Shay locomotives have been preserved and can be seen in railway museums across North America and in other parts of the performance. Several operational Shays continue to be key attractions on heritage and tourist railways, where they serve as a living reminder of the industrious spirit of their era.

Today, the legacy of the Shay locomotive is not merely about its technical specifications or its utility in the logging industry. It symbolizes a significant period of industrial development and represents the ingenuity and inventive spirit of its creator, Ephraim Shay.

For historians and train enthusiasts, the Shay locomotive remains an enduring symbol of the steam era's technological advancements and the transformative impacts of rail transport on industrial societies.

Surviving Examples

Engine Number Lima Number Date Built Gauge Type Class Current Owner Status Heritage
2 122 9/1884 36" 2-Truck A 15-2 Turtle Bay Exploration Park Paul Bunyan's Forest Camp (Redding, California Display Built as Rumsey Lumber Company #2 (Big Rapids, Michigan); sold to Horning & Hart Railroad (#122) of Woodville, Michigan in 1890; sold to El Dorado Lumber Company (#2) of Camino, California in 1901. Renamed as the C. D. Danaher Pine Company (1911), R. E. Danaher Company (1915), and finally Michigan-California Lumber Company (1918).
23 169 8/1887 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 28-2 Privately Owned (Centralia, Washington) Under Restoration Built as Big Rapids & Western Railroad #23 (Big Rapids, Michigan); sold to Marysville & Northern Railway (Marysville, Washington) in 1891; sold to Winchester Bay Lumber Company (Reedsport, Oregon) in 1921; became Smith-Powers Logging Company (#3) of Powers, Oregon; then Coos Bay Lumber Company; and finally Georgia-Pacific Corporation.
3 549 4/1898 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 30-2 City of Cadillac, Michigan Display Built as Boyne City & Southeastern Railroad (Boyne City, MI); became Boyne City, Gaylord & Alpena Railroad in 1914; sold to Michigan Forest Products (#3) of Strongs, Michigan in 1918; then Cadillac Lumber & Chemical Company (#3) of Sault St Marie, Michigan; and finally as the Cadillac-Soo Lumber Company (Sault Ste Marie, Michigan) in 1924. Donated to the city of Cadillac in 1956.
12 789 10/1903 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 75-3 Pacific Locomotive Association (Sunol, California) Stored Built as Sierra Railway #12. Sold to Pickering Lumber Company (Standard, California) in 1926. Acquired by the PLA in 1966.
1 906 8/1904 30" 2-Truck A 15-2 Munro Tramway Historical Group, Inc. (Palmtree, Queensland/Australia) Display Built as A. & D. Munro Company's Munro Tramway #1.
1 911 8/1904 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 65-3 Northwest Railway Museum (Snoqualmie, Washington) Display Built as Newhouse, Copper Gulch & Sevier Lake Railroad #1 (Newhouse, Utah); acquired by South Utah Mines & Smelters of Salt Lake City in 1910; acquired by the Cramer Kay Machinery Company of Newhouse, Utah in 1915; sold to Eastern Railway & Lumber Company (#1) of Centralia, Washington in 1916; and finally became S. A. Agnew Lumber Company (#1) in 1942. Donated to the Puget Sound Railway Historical Association in 1964.
2 918 8/1904 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 37-2 Privately Owned (Goshen, Virginia) Restoration Built for A. A. Low/Horse Shoe Forestry Company (Bog River Mill #6, Horseshoe, New York); sold to Porterwood Lumber Company (#1) of Porterwood, West Virginia in 1920; and finally sold to Intermountain Coal & Lumber Company (#2) of Putney, Kentucky in 1923.
1 949 11/1904 36" 2-Truck B 33-2 Privately Owned (Goshen, Virginia) Display Built as Wilson Creek Lumber Company/WM Ritter Lumber Company #1 of Mortimer, North Carolina. Subsequently transferred to different WM Ritter operations: Pineola, North Carolin (1905); Welch, West Virginia (1913); Fremont, Virginia (1919); and McClure, Virginia (1928). Subsequently became Clinchfield Coal Corporation #1 in 1948 before becoming McClure Lumber & Builder’s Supply Company. Rebuilt as a diesel-mechanical locomotive circa 1950.
5 982 1/1905 36" 2-Truck B 33-2 Chapultepec Park (Mexico City, Mexico) Display Beristain-Necaxa Railroad (Mexican Light & Power Company): Beristain, Mexico
5 1503 11/1905 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 80-3 Cass Scenic Railroad #5 (Cass, West Virginia) Operational Built for the West Virginia Pulp & Paper Company/Greenbrier & Elk River Railroad (#5). Became Mower Lumber Company (#5) in 1942. Acquired by the state of West Virginia in 1962.
1 1519 7/1905 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 65-3 B&O Railroad Museum (Baltimore) Display Built as G. W. Huntley & Son #1 (Ronceverte, West Virginia); sold to West Virginia Pulp & Paper Company/Greenbrier, Cheat & Elk Railroad #1 in 1915; became Mower Lumber Company #1 (Cass, West Virginia in 1942; and acquired by the state of West Virginia in 1962. Leased to the B&O Railroad Museum since 1980.
19 1568 7/1905 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 65-3 Veterans Park (Harrod, Ohio) Display Built as Strouds Creek & Muddlety Railroad/Tioga Lumber Company #2 (Tioga, West Virginia); sold to the Sutton Company, Inc. (#2) in 1944; became Cherry River Boom & Lumber Company #2 in 1949; sold to the Elk River Coal & Lumber Company/Buffalo Creek & Gauley Railroad (#19) in 1958; became Georgia-Pacific Corporation #19 in 1961.
4 1643 3/1906 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 37-2 Heritage Museum (Libby, Montana) Restoration Built as Thompson Greer & Company #11 (Buhl, Minnesota); sold to J. Neils Lumber Company (#4) of Libby, Montana in 1921. Became St. Regis Paper Company #4, then Champion International #4. Retired in 1946.
2 1799 12/1906 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 65-3 Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania (Strasburg) Display Built as Enterprise Lumber Company/Enterprise Railway #4 (Alexandria, Louisiana); sold to Cherry River Boom & Lumber Company #16 (Richwood, West Virginia) in 1913. Sold to the J. Natwick & Company (Alexander, West Virginia) in 1949, then became the F. C. Cook & Company (#16) in 1950. Sold to the Ely-Thomas Lumber Company (#2) of Fenwick, West Virginia in 1954. Acquired by the Railroa Museum of PA in 1966.
2 1848 2/1907 36" 2-Truck B 37-2 Teziutlan Copper Corporation Plant (Teziutlán, Mexico) Display Teziutlan Copper Corporation Plant (Teziutlán, Mexico)
4 1896 4/1907 36" 2-Truck B 37-2 El Dorado Western Railway Foundation (Placerville, California) Restoration Built as Norman B. Livermore & Company (San Francisco); became Diamond & Caldor Railway #4 (Diamond Springs, California).
2 2005 10/1907 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 42-2 Austin State University (Nacogdoches, Texas) Display Built as Bering Manufacturing Company/Bering, Kiam & Southern Railroad #2 (Bering, Texas); sold as W. T. Carter & Brother Lumber Company #2 (Camden, Texas).
2 2097 6/1908 30" 2-Truck A 18-2 Illawarra Light Railway Museum Society (Wollongong, New South Wales/Australia Restoration Built as A. & D. Munro Company/Munro Tramway #2 (Palmtree/Queensland, Australia).
9 2143 3/1909 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck A 36-2 Mid-Continent Railway Museum (North Freedom, Wisconsin) Display Built as Sawyer-Goodman Company #9 (Pembine, Wisconsin); became Goodman Lumber Company #9. Originally acquired by the Hayward Lumberjack Museum in 1955.
2147 2147 4/1909 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Little River Railroad Museum (Townsend, Tennessee) Display Built for the Davis Supply Company (Pittsburgh); became Tellico River Lumber Company #2147 (Tellico Plains, Tennessee); became Babcock Lumber & Land Company #2147 (Alcoa, Tennessee), then Bond-Woolf Lumber Company #2147; sold to the Little River Lumber Company/Little River Railroad (#2147) of Townsend, Tennessee; became John J. Craig Company #2147 (Friendsville, Tennnessee) in 1940; then Conasauga River Lumber Company #2147 in 1960. Acquired by the Little River Railroad Museum in 1982.
1 2172 5/1909 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 42-2 World Forestry Center, Portland, OR Display Built for the Hofius Steel & Equipment Company (Seattle, Washington); became Gig Harbor Timber Company #1 (Gig Harbor, Washington); then sold to the Stimson Timber Company (#1) of Belfair, Washington in 1913. Transferred to Stimson's Gaston, Oregon operation in 1931, named "Peggy." Donated to the city of Portland in 1955.
23 2194 7/1909 36" 2-Truck B 42-2 Privately Owned (Olympia, Washington) Restoration Built as Santa Barbara Tie & Pole Company #1 (Hodges, New Mexico); sold to Little Cottonwood Transportation Company (#3) of Wasatch, Utah in 1917, then George H. Watson & Company in 1924; became Amalgamated Pioche Mines & Smelters Corporation/Pioche Pacific Railroad #3 of Pioche, Nevada, then Bristol Silver Mines Company #3.
5 2257 1/1910 30" 2-Truck B 42-2 Codelco Chile Division El Teniente (Rancagua, Chile) Display Built as Braden Copper Company #5.
3 2297 4/1910 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 60-2 Tuolumne County Fairgrounds (Sonora, California Display Built as Standard Lumber Company/Sugar Pine Railway #3; sold to the Pickering Lumber Corporation (#3) of Standard, California in 1926.
3 2305 5/1910 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 24-2 Privately Owned (Lebanon, Oregon) Restoration Built as East Kootenay Lumber Company/East Kootenay Logging Railway #3 (Cranbrook, British Columbia); became Polson Logging Company #3; sold to Rayonier, Inc. (#3) of Hoquiam, Washington in 1948.
1 2317 5/1910 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 42-2 Steamtown National Historic Site (Scranton, Pennsylvania) Display Built as Meadow River Lumber Company #1 (Rainelle, West Virginia).
10 2348 12/1910 36" 2-Truck B 24-2 Insular Lumber Company (Hinoba-an, Negros Occidental/Philippines) Display Built as Cadwallader-Gibson Lumber Company #3 (Limay, Bataan Province/Philippines). Became Insular Lumber Company #10 in 1938.
13 2351 8/1910 30" 2-Truck A 18-2 Alishan Forest Railway (Taipei, Taiwan) Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #11 of Formosa (Japan). Later renumbered 13 (1945), serving Keelung, Taiwan.
12 2352 8/1910 30" 2-Truck A 18-2 Alishan Forest Railway (Chiayi, Taiwan) Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #12 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
35 2366 8/1910 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 The Eskbank Locomotive Depot & Museum (Lithgow, New South Wales/Australia) Dissembled Built as Raleigh & Southwestern Railway (Raleigh Lumber Company/WM Ritter) #35 of Glen Morgan, West Virginia. Transferred to various WM Ritter properties including Rainbow Springs, North Carolina; Proctor, North Carolina; and New River, Tennessee. Last operated as Brimstone & New River Railroad #35 in 1965. Went under various private ownerships until being acquired by Australian interests.
4 2374 9/1910 30" 2-Truck A 20-2 Ingenio Plantation (Santa Lucía Cotzumalguapa, Guatemala) Display Worked at the Ingenio Pantelon as #4, named 'San Vicente' (Santa Lucía Cotzumalguapa, Guatemala).
3 2449 5/1911 36" 2-Truck B 42-2 Mexico City, Mexico Display Built as Teziutlan Copper Company #3 (Tezuitlan, Mexico)
7 2465 7/1911 36" 3-Truck C 60-3 Roaring Camp & Big Trees Narrow-Gauge Railroad #7 (Felton, California) Operational Originally Truckee Lumber Company/Butte & Plumas Railway #4 (Oroville, California); became Swayne Lumber Company #4 in 1912; sold to West Side Lumber Company/Hetch Hetchy & Yosemite Valley Railroad #7 of Tuolumne, California in 1918; became Pickering Lumber Company #7 in 1925, then West Side Lumber #7 in 1934. Donated to the city of Sonora, California in 1964.
1 2475 9/1911 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 42-2 British Columbia Forest Discovery Centre (Duncan, British Columbia) Display Originally Bloedel, Stewart & Welch #1 (Myrtle Point, British Columbia); transferred to its Menzies Bay, BC operation in 1928. Became Great Central Sawmills/Bloedel, Stewart & Welch #1 (Great Central, BC) and lastly MacMillan & Bloedel #1 of MChemainus, BC.
102 2490 2/1912 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 42-2 Vernonia, Oregon Display Originally Western Cooperage Company/Astoria Southern Railway #2 (Olney, Oregon); sold to Clark County Timber Company (Yacolt, Washington) in 1922; sold to Porter-Carstens Logging Company (Estacada, Oregon) in 1925; sold to Oregon-American Lumber Company (#2) of Keasey, Oregon in 1928; sold to Long-Bell Lumber Company (#102) of Vernonia, Oregon in 1953.
6 2519 2/1912 36" 2-Truck B 32-2 Roaring Camp & Big Trees Narrow-Gauge Railroad #6 (Felton, California) Restoration Built as Elk & Little Kanawa Railroad #7 (Gassaway, West Virginia); sold to WM Ritter Lumber Company/Big Sandy & Cumberland Railroad (#7) of Devon, West Virginia in 1920; became Norfolk & Western #7 in 1933; sold to WM Ritter's (#7) Hurley, Virginia operation in 1937; transferred to its Daisy, Kentucky operation in 1948.
2 2548 6/1912 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 42-2 Alberni Valley Museum (Port Alberni, British Columbia) Restoration Originally operated as Weist Logging Company #1 (Port Alberni, BC). Sold to Alberni Pacific Lumber Company (#2) of Franklin River, BC in 1918. Retired from service in 1950.
14 2549 6/1912 30" 2-Truck A 18-2 Puffing Billy Preservation Society (Belgrave, Victoria/Australia) Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #14 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan. Transferred to the Puffing Billy Railway (#14) in 1971.
15 2550 6/1912 30" 2-Truck A 18-2 Chiayi City, Tiawan Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #15 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
21 2557 7/1912 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Chiayi City, Tiawan Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #21 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
No Number 2576 8/1912 36" 2-Truck B 32-2 Privately Owned (Melbourne, Victoria/Australia) Disassembled Originally operated at the Lloyd Copper Company (#2) of Burraga, New South Wales/Australia. Transferred to Hoskins Steelworks of Lithgow, New South Wales in 1920. It later, in 1928, operated at Victorian Hardwood & Sawmilling Company of Powelltown, Victoria/Australia. Last owned by dealer Cameron & Sutherland of Melbourne, Australia (1946).
3 2582 7/1912 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Gómez Palacio, Durango/Mexico Display Built as McGaffey Contracting Company #1 (Perea, New Mexico). Sold to Lutcher & Moore Lumber Company (Albuquerque, New Mexico) in 1929. Last sold to S. A. Compania Maderera Durango of El Salto, Durango/Mexico in 1935.
1 2593 10/1912 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 42-2 Roaring Camp & Big Trees Narrow-Gauge Railroad #1 (Felton, California) Operational Built as Alaculsy Lumber Company #3 (Conasauga, Tennessee); became Tennga Lumber Company #3 in 1917; acquired by Southern Iron & Equipment Company in 1919; sold to W. M. Ritter Lumber Company/Smoky Mountain Railway #3 of Proctor, North Carolina; sold to Coal Processing Corporation #3 in Dixiana, Virginia in 1938. Acquired by Roaring Camp & Big Trees in 1962.
3 2598 10/1912 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Pennsylvania Lumber Museum (Galeton, Pennsylvania) Display Built as Eakin Lumber Company/Erbacon & Summerville Railroad #2 (Skyles, West Virginia. Transferred to its Fenwick, WV operation in 1927 which became Ely Thomas Lumber Company in 1942. Donated in 1964.
16 2632 1/1913 30" 2-Truck A 18-2 Chinan National Forest Recreation Area, Taiwan Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #16 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
17 2633 1/1913 30" 2-Truck A 18-2 Alishan, Taiwan Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #17 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
18 2634 1/1913 30" 2-Truck A 18-2 Fenqihu, Taiwan Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #18 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
15 2645 5/1913 36" 3-Truck C 60-3 Yosemite Mountain Sugar Pine Railroad #15 (Fish Camp, California) Operational Originally operated at the Sierra Nevada Wood & Lumber Company #9 (Truckee, California); sold to Hobart Estate Company #9 (Hobart Mills, California); later worked as West Side Lumber #15 in 1938 (Tuolumne, California).
22 2664 8/1913 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Jiji Train Station (Taipei, Taiwan) Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #22 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
1 2679 6/1913 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 Komoka Railway Museum (Komoka, Ontario) Display Built as Dennis Canadian Lumber Company #1 (Whitney, ON); sold to Hope Lumber Company #1 (Ruel, ON) in 1923; sold to Pakesley Lumber Company/Key Valley Railway #1 in 1930; sold to Standard Chemical Company #3 (Fassett, Quebec) in 1935; sold to Beaver Charcoal Company (South River, ON) in 1952; and finally acquired by Ray Industries (South River, ON) in 1957.
3 2712 12/1913 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 24-2 Atikokan Centennial Museum (Atikokan, Ontario) Display Built as Shevlin-Clarke Company #3 (Flanders, ON); became Nipigon Lake Timber Company #1 (Sioux Lookout, ON) in 1945.
23 2714 8/1913 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Alishan, Taiwan Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #23 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
24 2724 Alishan, Taiwan 8/1913 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #24 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
1 2769 9/1914 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 42-2 Columbia Falls, Montana Display Built for Great Northern Railway's Somers Lumber Company (#1) of Somers, Montana. Sold to P. L. Howe Lumber Mills of Eureka, Montana in 1919; became Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company in 1923; sold to State Lumber Company #1 of Columbia Falls, Montana in 1924; became F. H. Stoltz Land & Lumber Company in 1933.
5 2273 6/1914 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Privately Owned (El Salto, Durango/Mexico) Stored Built as McGaffey Contracting Company #2 of McGaffey, New Mexico. Sold to Lutcher & Moore Lumber Company of Orange, Texas in 1929. Acquired by S. A. Compania Maderera de Durango (#5) of El Salto, Durango/Mexico in 1933.
25 2787 8/1914 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Chiayi City, Taiwan Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #25 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
26 2788 8/1914 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Chiayi City, Taiwan Operational Built as Alishan Forest Railway #26 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
28 2790 8/1914 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Miaoli, Taiwan Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #28 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
29 2791 8/1914 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Fenqihu, Taiwan Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #29 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
No Number 2800 11/1914 24" 2-Truck A 13-2 Sunshine Coast Council Nambour (Queensland, Australia) Restoration Originally operated on the Maroochy Shire Council's Mapleton Tramway, named "Mapleton" (Queensland, Australia); operated at the nearby Moreton Central Sugar Mill beginning in 1944; later renamed "Shay" and retired in 1960.
10 2804 1/1916 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Cass Scenic Railroad #36, Cass, WV Restoration Built as W. M. Carney Mill Company #5 (Atmore, Alabama); later sold to Raleigh Lumber Company/WM Ritter's Raleigh & Southwestern Railway #1 (Fitzpatrick, West Virginia) in 1917; later worked at WM Ritter's Oxley, WV operation; transferred to the Winding Gulf Railroad (#1) of Maben, WV. In 1945 transferred to WM Ritter's New River, Tennessee operation (#36). Last worked as Brimstone & New River Railroad #36.
14 2835 6/1916 36" 3-Truck C 60-3 Georgetown Loop Railroad Operational Originally operated on the Sierra Nevada Wood & Lumber Company #10 of Hobart Mills, California. Later operated as West Side Lumber Company #14 of Tuolumne, California in 1939.
14 2876 10/1916 30" 3-Truck C 60-3 Rancagua, Chile Display Built as Braden Copper Company #14 (Rancagua, Chile).
1 2932 10/1917 1 Meter 2-Truck B 42-2 National Museum (Potosi, Bolivia) Stored Originally operated as F. C. La Paz Yungas #1 (La Paz, Bolivia); operated for Empresa Nacional de F. C. del Estado in 1964.
508 2933 10/1917 1 Meter 2-Truck B 42-2 National Museum (Potosi, Bolivia) Stored Originally operated as F. C. La Paz Yungas #2 (La Paz, Bolivia); operated for Empresa Nacional de F. C. del Estado in 1964.
6 2938 7/1917 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 Privately Owned (Wells, Michigan) Storage Originally operated as Hammond Lumber Company #551 (Rainier, Oregon). Transferred to Kerry, Oregon and then Kelso, Washington in 1924. Became Hauser Construction Company #551 (Bingen, Washington) in 1938; transferred to Guy F. Atkinson Company (#551) in Enumclaw, Washington in 1939 and later worked at Neah Bay, Washington. Lastly operated as J. Neils Lumber Company #6 of Libby, Montana in 1941.
5 2940 10/1917 36" 2-Truck B 36-2 National Railroad Museum (Green Bay, Wisconsin) Display Built as Pardee & Curtin Lumber Company/Cherry & Hominy Railroad #12 (Curtin, West Virginia). Became Ely-Thomas Lumber Company #5 (Fenwick, West Virginia) in 1947.
31 2946 11/1917 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Alishan Forest Railway (Chiayi City, Taiwan) Operational Built as Alishan Forest Railway #31 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
32 2947 11/1917 30" 2-Truck B 28-2 Alishan Forest Railway (Chiayi City, Taiwan) Display Built as Alishan Forest Railway #32 (Formosa, Japan). Later worked in Keelung, Taiwan.
8 2977 5/1918 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 Railway Historical Society of Northern New York (Croghan, New York) Restoration Built as Oklahoma Portland Cement Company #2 (Ada, Oklahoma); sold to Virgin Pine Lumber Company (#15) of Piave, Mississippi in 1920; became C&R Lumber Company (#15) of Blodgett, Mississippi in 1926; became Goodyear Yellow Pine Company (#15) of Picayune, Mississippi in 1931; became Crosby Lumber & Manufacturing Company (#15) of Crosby, Mississippi in 1944; and finally as Pascagoula Veneer Company #1 (Crosby, MS).
No Number 2978 5/1918 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 Roots of Motive Power (Willits, California) Display Originaly operated as North Bend Mill & Lumber Company #2978 of North Bend, Oregon; became Stout Lumber Company of Oregon #2978 in 1924; then became McKenna Lumber Company #2978 (Marshfield, Oregon); became Conlaugh & McKenna Lumber Company #2978 (North Bend, Oregon); became Oregon White Cedar Company #2978 of Charleston, Oregon in 1928; next operated as Ingham Lumber Company #2978 of Glendale, Oregon and finally as Robert Dollar Company #2978 (Glendale, Oregon) in 1946.
7 3014 11/1918 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 Timber Heritage Association (Eureka, California) Stored Built as Lamson Logging Company, Inc. #1 (Barco, Washington). Sold to Northern Redwood Lumber Company/Arcata & Mad River Railroad #7 (Korbel, California) in 1942, which became Simpson Timber Company in 1956.
5 3066 12/1919 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 White Mountain Central Railroad (North Woodstock, New Hampshire) Stored Built as Woodstock Lumber Company/Beebe River Railroad #5 (Beebe River, New Hampshire); became Draper Corporation #5 of Beebe River, NH in 1924; became Parker-Young Company/East Branch & Lincoln Railroad #5 of Lincoln, New Hampshire in 1935. Acquired by a private owner in 1950, then to the White Mountain Central Railroad in 1961.
4 3092 7/1920 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Sierra Nevada Logging Museum (Arnold, California) Display Built as Yosemite Lumber Company (#4) of Merced Falls, California; became Yosemite Sugar Pine Lumber Company #4 in 1935.
12 3118 5/1920 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 10-2 Privately Owned, Foster Brook & State Line Railroad (Bradford, Pennsylvania) Operational Built as Good Roads Construction Company #3118 (Leachville, Arkansas); became Colbert Lime Rock Asphalt Company (#1) of Cherokee, Alabama in 1925. It was abandoned by 1933 and originally rescued for preservation in 1968.
7 3131 10/1920 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Cass Scenic Railroad #7 (Cass, West Virginia) Awaiting Restoration Built as Raine Lumber Company #3 (Honeydew, West Virginia) then became Raine Lumber & Coal Company of Duo, West Virginia in 1928. Last operated as Meadow River Lumber Company #7 of Rainelle, West Virginia in 1935.
3 3142 12/1920 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 80-3 Cass Scenic Railroad #3 (Cass, West Virginia) Display Built as Eastern Railway & Lumber Company #3 (Centralia, Washington); became S. A. Agnew Lumber Company #3 in 1942.
1 3147 12/1920 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 24-2 British Columbia Forest Discovery Centre (Duncan, British Columbia) Display Built as Hillcrest Lumber Company #1 (Sahtlam, British Columbia), which became Export Lumber Company #1 in 1934. Later operated as Osborne Bay Wharf Company #1 (Crofton, British Columbia) in 1947.
1 3169 11/1921 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Hewitt Park (Oroville, California) Display Built as Hutchinson Lumber Company #1 (Feather Falls, California); became Feather River Pine Mills #1 in 1927, then Feather River Railway #1.
6 3170 11/1921 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 80-3 El Portal Transportation Museum (El Portal, California) Display Built as Hetch Hetchy Railroad #6 (Groveland, California); became Pickering Lumber Company #6 in 1926.
2 3172 6/1922 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 80-3 Travel Town Museum (Los Angeles, California) Display Built as a Lima stock locomotive. Sold to the Little River Redwood Company (#4) of Crannell, California; became Hammond & Little River Redwood Company #4 in 1931; then became Camino, Placerville & Lake Tahoe Railroad #2 (Camino, California) in 1935.
8 3176 3/1922 36" 3-Truck C 70-3 Royal Gorge Route (Cañon City, Colorado) Display Built as West Side Lumber Company/Hetch Hetchy & Yosemite Valley Railroad #8 of Tuolumne, California. Became Pickering Lumber Company #8 in 1925; West Side Lumber Company #8 in 1934; and finally Pickering Lumber Corporation #8 in 1958.
2 3177 2/1922 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 90-3 Railtown 1897 State Historic Park (Jamestown, California) Operational Built as Hutchinson Lumber Company #2 (Feather Falls, California); subsequently became Feather River Pine Mills #2 (1927), then Feather River Railway #2 (1939).
33 3180 6/1922 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 90-3 Timber Heritage Association (Eureka, California) Stored Built as Hammond Lumber Company #33 (Crannell, California), then became Hammond & Little River Redwood Company #33 in 1931. In 1936 it was transferred to Hammond Redwood Company (#33) of Samoa, California, then again became Hammond Lumber Company #33. In 1944 it became Pickering Lumber Corporation #33 of Standard, California.
4 3189 12/1922 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 90-3 Cass Scenic Railroad #4 (Cass, West Virginia) Operational Built as Birch Valley Lumber Company/Strouds Creek & Muddlety Railroad #5 (Tioga, West Virginia); became Mower Lumber Company #4 (Cass, West Virginia) in 1943.
11 3197 12/1922 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 60-3 Duncan Park (Natchez, Mississippi) Display Originally operated as Crosby & Rosa Lumber Company #11 (Blodgett, Mississippi). Became Virgin Pine Lumber Company #11 of Piave, MS in 1929; and finally Crosby Lumber & Manufacturing Company #11 in 1937.
9 3199 4/1923 36" 3-Truck C 70-3 Midwest Central Railroad (Mt. Pleasant, Iowa) Operational Built as West Side Lumber Company/Hetch Hetchy & Yosemite Valley Railroad #9 (Tuolumne, California); became Pickering Lumber Company #9 in 1925, then West Side Lumber Company #9 in 1934.
5 3203 5/1923 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Arizona State Railroad Museum (Williams Arizona) Restoration Built for Anaconda Copper Mining Company-Lumber Department #5 (Bonner, Montana). Last operated in 1925.
11 3221 7/1923 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 90-3 Cass Railroad #11 (Cass, West Virginia) Operational Originally operated as the Hutchinson Lumber Company #3 of Feather Falls, California. Became Feather River Pine Mills #3 in 1927, then Feather River Railway #3 in 1939.
1 3233 9/1923 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 80-3 Oregon Historical Society (Prineville, Oregon) Operational Originally operated as Independence Logging Company #1 (Independence, Washington). Last operated as Mount Emily Lumber Company #1 (Hilgard, Oregon) beginning in 1928.
112 3241 10/1923 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 60-2 Center for Transportation & Commerce (Galveston, Texas) Display On loan for display Texas City, TX Conasauga River Lumber Co., Conasauga, TN
7 3248 1/1924 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 80-3 Shelton Chamber of Commerce (Shelton, Washington) Display Built for Simpson Logging Company (#7) of Shelton, Washington. Named "Ed Elliott." Transferred to McCleary, Washington in 1955.
5 3249 1/1924 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 Longview, Washington Restoration Built as Security Logging Company #2 (Tolt, Washington); became Snow Lumber & Shingle Company #2 (Littell, Washington) in 1924; acquired by Shaw-Bertram Lumber Company #5 (Kirk, Oregon) in 1929; sold to Snellstrom Brothers (#5) of Vaughn, Oregon in 1938 which became Long-Bell Lumber Company in 1945.
8 3254 4/1924 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 90-3 Privately Owned (Merrill, Oregon) Stored Built as Cascade Timber Company #108 (Reliance, Washington); became Long-Bell Lumber Company #1008 (Ryderwood, Washington) in 1939. Loaned to Standard Logging Company of Cochran, Oregon from 1940-1952. Last operated as Pickering Lumber Corporation #8 of Standard, California.
1925 3256 2/1925 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 North Carolina Transportation Museum (Spencer, NC) Display Built as a Lima stock locomotive. Sold to Bemis Lumber Company's Graham County Railroad (#1925) of Robbinsville, North Carolina
3 3262 4/1924 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 British Columbia Forest Discovery Centre (Duncan, British Columbia) Operational Built as Mayo Lumber Company (Paldi, British Columbia)
4 3274 11/1924 42" 2-Truck B 36-2 Philippine Lumber Manufacturing Company (Fabrica, Negros Occidental/Philippines) Stored Built as the Negros Philippine Lumber Company #4 (Iloilo, Cadiz). Became Philippine Lumber Manufacturing Company (Catabangan, Luzon/Philippines) in 1938.
1 3281 3/1925 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 36-2 Picayune, Mississippi Display Built as Batson-McGehee Lumber Company #1 of Millard, Mississippi. Became Goodyear Yellow Pine Company #1 (Picayune, Mississippi) in 1943; then Crosby Forest Products #1 of Picayune, Mississippi in 1950.
7 3286 3/1925 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 80-3 Privately Owned (Jamestown, California) Display Built as Fruit Growers Supply Company #5 (Hilts, California); became Standard Logging Company #5 (Cochran, Oregon) in 1939, then Long-Bell Lumber Company #5 in 1945. It lastly operated as Pickering Lumber Corporation #7 (Standard, California) in 1947.
10 3288 8/1925 36" 2-Truck B 24-2 Allen County Museum (Lima, Ohio) Display Built as Lima Stone Companhy #10 (Lima, Ohio), then became National Lime & Stone Company in 1947.
1 3289 10/1925 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 Canada Science and Technology Museum (Ottawa, Ontario) Operational Built as Merrill & Ring Lumber Company #4 (Squamish, British Columbia); became Comox Lumber & Railway Company #15 (Ladysmith, BC) in 1942; last operated as Elk Falls Company #1 (Duncan Bay, BC) beginning in 1951.
70 3298 2/1926 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Anson Park (Iroquois Falls, Ontario) Display Built as Tallassee Power Company #9 (Calderwood, Tennessee); became Knoxville Power Company #9 in 1926; sold to Alcoa Power Company #10 (Arvida, Quebec) in 1928; sold to Dominion Construction Compay #10 (Cochran, Ontario) in 1930; sold to Standard Chemical Company #10, (South River, Ontario) in 1940; last operated as Abitibi Power & Paper Company (Iroquois Falls, Ontario) beginning in 1947.
12 3302 2/1926 36" 3-Truck C 60-3 Georgetown Loop Railroad Operational Built as Swayne Lumber Company #6 (Oroville, California); became West Side Lumber Company #12 (Tuolumne, California) in 1940.
8 3309 3/1927 42" 2-Truck B 42-2 Insular Lumber Company (Sagay City, Negros/Philippines) Stored Built as Insular Lumber Company #8 Fabrica, Negros Occidental/Philippines.
12 3311 6/1927 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 50-2 Kaatza Station Museum (Lake Cowichan, British Columbia) Display Originally operated as Merrill & Ring Lumber Company #2 (Squamish, British Columbia). Sold to Comox Logging & Railway Company #12 (Ladysmith, BC) in 1942.
6 3314 9/1927 4' 8 ½" 2-Truck B 32-2 New Jersey Museum of Transportation (Farmingdale, NJ) Restoration Built as Phoenix Utility Company #9 (Waterville, North Carolina). Sold to Fontana Mining Company (#9) of Fontana, North Carolina in 1929, then became North Carolina Exploration Compay #9 in 1931. It next operated as Champion Fibre & Paper Company #9 (Canton, North Carolina) in 1947 and was last sold to the Ely-Thomas Lumber Company of Jetsville/Richwood, West Virginia in 1947.
10 3315 3/1928 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 70-3 Yosemite Mountain Sugar Pine Railroad (Fish Camp, California) Operational Built as Pickering Lumber Company #10 (Tuolumne, California). Became West Side Lumber Company #10 in 1934.
2 3320 7/1928 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck 3-PC-13 Cass Scenic Railroad #2 (Cass, West Virginia) Operational Built as a Lima stock locomotive. Eventually sold to Mayo Lumber Company (#4) of Paldi, British Columbia; became Lake Logging Company #4 (Lake Cowichan, British Columbia) in 1943; sold to Western Forest Indutries #5 (Honeymoon Bay, British Columbia) in 1946; and last operated commerically as Railway Appliance Research #114 (North Vancouver, British Columbia) in 1962. Acquired by the state of West Virginia in 1970.
11 3327 1/1929 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck 3-PC-13 Mt. Rainier Scenic Railroad (Mineral, Washington) Stored Built as a Lima stock locomotive. Originally sold as Forest Lumber Company #5 (Pine Ridge, Oregon); sold to Pickering Lumber Corporation (Standard, California) as #11 in 1941.
5 3336 5/1929 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 60-3 Illinois Railway Museum (Union, Illinois) Operational Built as J. Neils Lumber Company #5 (Libby, Montana). Became Klickitat Logging & Lumber Company #5 of Klickitat, Washington in 1939. Last operated commercially as Klickitat Logging & Lumber Company #5 (St. Regis Paper Company) beginning in 1957.
107 3345 11/1929 36" 3-Truck C 60-3 LaPorte County Historical Steam Society (Hesston, Indiana) Operational Originally operated as New Mexico Lumber Company #7 (Dolores, Colorado). Sold to Oregon Lumber Company #7 (Baker, Oregon) in 1937.
7 3346 11/1929 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck 3-PC-13 Privately Owned (Willits, California) Awaiting Restoration Originally operated as Great Northern Railway's Somers Lumber Company #2 (Somers, Montana). Became J. Neils Lumber Company's Klickitat Log & Lumber Company #7 (Klickitat, Washington) in 1942; became Klickitat Logging & Lumber Company #7 (St. Regis Paper Company) in 1957.
10 3348 4/1930 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck 3-PC-13 Tillicum Park (Forks, Washington) Display Built as a Lima stock locomotive. Operated as Ozette Timber Company #10 (Lake Ozette, Washington) in 1941. Became Rayonier #10 (Sekiu, Washington) in 1945.
115 3350 4/1936 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck 3-PC-13 Fort Steele Heritage Town (Fort Steele, British Columbia) Display Originally operated as Merrill Ring Wilson #5 (Rock Bay, BC). Sold to Hillcrest Lumber Company #5 (later renumbered 11) of Mesachie Lake, BC in 1945. Became Canadian Forest Products #11 (later renumbered 115) of Beaver Cove, BC in 1949. Last operated as Railway Appliance Research (North Vancouver, British Columbia) beginning in 1962.
6 3354 5/1945 4' 8 ½" 3-Truck C 150-3 Cass Scenic Railroad #6 (Cass, West Virginia) Operational Built as Western Maryland Railway #6 in 1945. Retired from service in 1950. Acquired by the B&O Railroad Museum in 1953; leased to the state of West Virginia in 1980. Largest surviving Shay locomotive.

Sources

  • Adams, Kramer A. Logging Railroads Of The West. New York: Bonanza Books, 1961.
  • Fetters, Thomas.  Logging Railroads Of South Carolina.  Forest Park:  Heimburger House Publishing Company, 1990.
  • Fetters, Thomas.  Logging Railroads Of The Blue Ridge And Smoky Mountains, Volume I (Gold Mountain, Black Mountain And White Top).  Hillsboro: TimberTimes, 2007.
  • Fetters, Thomas.  Logging Railroads Of The Blue Ridge And Smoky Mountains, Volume 2 (Tallulah Falls, Anna Ruby Falls, And Jeffrey's Hell).  Hillsboro: TimberTimes, 2010.
  • Gove, Bill.  Logging Railroads Of The Adirondacks.  Syracuse:  Syracuse University Press, 2006.
  • Gove, Bill.  Logging Railroads Of New Hampshire's North Country.  Littleton: Bondcliffs Books, 2010.
  • Kline Jr. Benjamin F.G.  Tall Pines And Winding Rivers: The Logging Railroads Of Maryland.  Strasburg:  The Friends Of The Railroad Museum Of PA, 2007 (Second Edition).
  • King, Frank A.  Minnesota Logging Railroads.  Minneapolis:  University Of Minnesota Press, 2003 (First University Of Minnesota Press Edition).
  • Labbe, John T. and Replinger, Peter J.  Logging To The Salt Chuck.  Seattle:  North West Shore Line, 1990.
  • Lawson Jr., Thomas.  Logging Railroads Of Alabama.  Birmingham: Cabbage Stack Publishing, 1996.
  • Warden, William E. West Virginia Logging Railroads. Lynchburg: TLC Publishing, 1993.

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