A Short Line Railroad Guide To U.S. Class III Carriers

In general, short lines tend to provide the most fascinating operations of any railroad.  As local, centrally based companies they are much more down-home in nature, often friendlier (than large Class Is), and are just more fun to watch than the big roads.  They also give you a look at what railroading used to be like decades ago, back during the nostalgic era.  The information here features most Class III carriers operating throughout the United States and they have been conveniently broken down by state.  The guide is compiled in alphabetical order by state (all American Association of Railroads [AAR] reporting marks are also included with each short line) and I hope you find it useful and helpful, particularly if you are planning a railfan outing and are interested in knowing where a short line operation or two can found in a particular area.

Winchester & Western low-nose GP9 #572 rolls through a rural grade-crossing with the "Sandman" turn at Hayfield, Virginia as it returns to Winchester during the summer of 2003.

Many short lines operating around the country are now owned by large conglomerates notably Watco, Genesee & Wyoming, and Iowa Pacific.  There are also a handful of smaller such companies including Pioneer RailCorp, Rio Grande Pacific Corporation, Patriot Rail, Pinsly, and Gulf & Ohio.  All of these systems are included in the state-by-state list below along with the independent operations although you can also find out more information about them by visiting their respective parent's website listed above.  Additionally, the larger Class II, regionals are mentioned although featured articles of many can be found here.  Please note that websites for individual short lines is not included within this list although several do have their own online destinations offering more information about their particular service(s).  To check out an individual states' short lines please visit the links below (Please note!:  This section is under construction and will take several weeks to compile the complete state-by-state list.)

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Alabama Short Line Railroad Guide

Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway (reporting mark, AGR):  The is a G&W property operating nearly 350 miles of track running from eastern Mississippi, through western Alabama, and finally terminating at Pensacola, Florida.  The route's heritage traces back to the eastern extent of the St. Louis-San Francisco's network and today the railroad handles more than 61,000 carloads annually including coal, iron and steel, chemicals, scrap iron, pulp and paper, and limestone.

Alabama & Tennessee River Railway (reporting mark, ATN):  The A&TR is owned by OmniTrax and has been in service since 2004 after acquiring 120 miles from CSX.  The route's heritage can be traced back to three predecessors including the L&N, Seaboard Air Line, and Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis.  Its current traffic includes steel, rubber, cement, agriculture, and other freight.

Alabama Railroad (reporting mark, ALAB):  The Alabama Railroad is a Pioneer RailCorp property operating 60 miles of trackage between Flomaton and Corduroy, Alabama.  A former L&N branch, the short line began service in 1991 and currently carries wood-based products.

Alabama Southern Railroad (reporting mark, ABS):  This Watco property began service on November 20, 2005 and operates about 85 miles of track between Columbus, Mississippi and Birmingham, Alabama under lease with Kansas City Southern.  The property was formerly Gulf, Mobile & Ohio trackage.

Alabama Warrior Railway (reporting mark, ABWR):  Formerly known as the Jefferson Warrior Railway prior to August 7, 2009, this Watco property operates about 15 miles of track around the Birmingham area.  Current freight includes pipe, scrap steel, cement, aggregates, and other traffic.

Bay Line Railroad (reporting mark, BAYL):  The Bay Line was historically the Atlanta & St. Andrews Bay Railway which dated back to the early 20th century.  It is currently a Genesee & Wyoming property operating more than 100 miles of trackage between the Florida Panhandle and southern Alabama.  It has been a G&W-owned since 2005 and transports a wide range of freight.

Birmingham Terminal Railway (reporting mark, BHRR):  Formerly known as the Birmingham Southern, this 76-mile system is owned by the Watco Companies.  It operates west and south of Birmingham connecting Bessemer and Port Birmingham.  The road has its own mechanical and locomotive shop.  Its heritage can be traced back to 1899 and for many years was jointly owned by the Southern and Louisville & Nashville.  In 1988 it was sold to Transtar which subsequently sold the property to Watco, which acquired it on February 1, 2012 renaming it as the Birmingham Terminal.

Chattahoochee Bay Railroad (reporting mark, CHAT):  The Chattahoochee Bay is a 25-mile short line serving Dothan and points east.  It is owned by the Genesee & Wyoming (since 2006) with primary products including chemicals, forest products, and food and feed products.

Conecuh Valley Railroad (reporting mark, COEH):  The Conecuh Valley is another G&W-owned property operating 12 miles of track from Troy to Goshen.  Its history dates back to the Central of Georgia and currently handles about 3,000 carloads annually with freight including poultry feed ingredients, plastic, lead, vegetable oil and food products.

Eastern Alabama Railway (reporting mark, EARY):  The East Alabama was a longtime RailAmerica property, which operated former L&N trackage sold to Kyle Railways by CSX on November 26, 1990.  It was purchased by RA in 2002, which was then acquired by G&W in 2012.  Today, it operates about 31 miles of track carrying limestone, urea, paper and corn syrup, moving more than 15,000 carloads annually.

Georgia Southwestern Railroad (reporting mark, GSWR):  This large short line is primarily based in western Georgia but also extends into eastern Alabama at Eufaula.  The road operates more than 230 miles of track and handles more than 13,000 carloads annually amongst a wide range of freight.  It has been a G&W property since 2008.

Huntsville-Madison County Railroad Authority (reporting mark, HMCR):  This locally owned short line operates on about 14 miles of former L&N track between Huntsville and Norton acquired from CSX in 1984.

Luxapalila Valley Railroad (reporting mark, LXVR):  This short line operates about 38 miles of track from Columbus, Mississippi to Belk, Alabama handling forest and waste products.  It is another G&W line with interchange connections including NS, KCS, and Columbus & Greenville.

Meridian & Bigbee Railroad (reporting mark, MNBR):  The historic Meridian & Bigbee has been in service since the 1930s and still operates its original route from Montgomery, Alabama to Meridian, Mississippi.  It is currently owned by G&W and handles a wide range of freight.

Redmont Railway (reporting mark, RRC):  This independent short line has operated since 1995 over about 41 miles of track on former Illinois Central trackage.  Its traffic is primarily based in agriculture but does include some other freight.

Sequatchie Valley Railroad (reporting mark, SQVR): This railroad just penetrates Alabama's northern region and is mostly located in Tennessee running from Kimball, Tennessee to Bridgeport, Alabama.  Its origins can be traced back to a carrier by the same but was for many years leased by the NC&StL.  It handles about 1,500 carloads annually with freight including plastics and lumber.

Terminal Railway-Alabama State Docks (reporting mark, TASD):  This terminal railroad is based in Mobile and has been in service since 1928.  The railroad has a total of 75 miles of track and serves the local port moving everything from coal and scrap steel to automotive products and chemicals.  The company interchanges with numerous systems including CSX, BNSF, Alabama & Gulf Coast, CG Railway, Canadian National, Norfolk Southern, and Kansas City Southern.

Tennessee Southern Railroad (reporting mark TSRR):  This short line is owned by Patriot Rail and operates primarily in Tennessee from Natco and Pulaski as well as southeasterly to Florence, Alabama.  It operates about 118 miles in all handling several thousand carloads annually with freight including scrap iron, coal, coke, woodpulp, pulp-board, sand, chemicals, steel, aluminum, and fertilizer raw materials.

Three Notch Railroad (reporting mark, TNHR):  Another G&W property, the Three Notch operates about 34 miles of track from Georgiana to Andalusia on trackage once owned by the L&N.  It handles slightly more than 1,000 carloads annually which includes chemicals, polypropylene, fertilizer and agricultural products. 

Wiregrass Central Railroad (reporting mark, WGCR):  This G&W line is located in southern Alabama operating 20 miles between Waterford and Enterprise.  Its history dates back to the Atlantic Coast Line and was originally sold to Gulf & Ohio in 1987 by CSX.  Today, the line handles more than 8,000 carloads annually.

Alaska Short Line Railroad Guide

Alaska Railroad (reporting mark, ARR):  The state's only freight hauler, the historic Alaska Railroad is a Class II, regional, dating back to its founding in 1914, acquiring the Alaska Northern Railroad and tasked with completing the route to Fairbanks.  Today, the ARR connects that point with Seward and Whittier.  While there have been initiatives to further extend the system these have never materialized thus far.  The railroad still provides regular passenger schedules along with its extensive freight service.  In all, the system currently stretches more than 500 miles including both main and secondary trackage while annual revenues exceed $160 million.

Arizona Short Line Railroad Guide

Apache Railway (reporting mark, APA):  The historic Apache Railway has been in service since 1917 connecting McNary to Holbrook, Arizona via Snowflake.  Since then the line has been cutback to Snowflake operating about 38 miles.  Today it handles what remaining freight it can following the closure of a paper mill, its primary source of traffic.  The road is well-known for using a fleet of classic Alco road-switchers.

Arizona & California Railroad (reporting mark, ARZC):  This short line has a history that dates back to the Arizona & California Railway, which first opened for service in 1907.  It was acquired by the Santa Fe and operated as a branch for man years between Matthie, Arizona and Cadiz, California.  In 1991 it became an independent short line known as the Arizona & California Railroad.  In 2002 it was acquired by RailAmerica, itself purchased by G&W in 2012  Today, the systems operates roughly 190 miles and handles about 12,000 carloads annually moving such freight as petroleum-based products, lumber, and steel.

Arizona Central Railroad (reporting mark, AZCR):  This short line is owned by the Western Group, which operates a small collection of short lines in the West.  It currently operates about 38 miles of trackage between Drake and Clarkdale, formerly owned by the Santa Fe until 1989.  It handles primarily inbound coal and outbound cement.  The property also operates the popular excursion known as the Verde Canyon Railway.

Arizona Eastern Railway (reporting mark, AZER):  The Arizona Eastern is a large operation utilizing more than 200 miles of trackage between Clifton and Miami, Arizona while it briefly enters New Mexico.  For more many years the property was owned by Southern Pacific before spun-off to RA in 2001.  In 2004 it was sold to Permian Basin Railways, which subsequently sold it to G&W in 2011.  Traffic today includes copper, chemicals, agricultural, and forest products.

Black Mesa & Lake Powell Railroad (no reporting mark):  This privately-owned railroad is operated by the Peabody Coal Company specifically to haul coal from the Kayenta Mine near Kayenta, Arizona to the Navajo Generating Station power plant at Page.  It has been in service since 1973 is about 78 miles in length although the trackage is not connected to the national rail network.

Copper Basin Railway (reporting mark CBRY):  This independent short line has been in service since 1986 when it acquired the SP's former branch running between Magma, just east of Phoenix, to Winkelman, Arizona.  The line is more than 70 miles in length and serves the local copper industry.

San Manuel Arizona Railroad (reporting mark, SMA):  This long-dormant short line since 2003 may soon again operate.  It first began service in 1955 serving the local copper industry and efforts are underway by Capstone Mining Corporation reactivate nearly 30 miles of property to continue serving copper interests.

San Pedro Southwestern Railroad (reporting mark, SPSR):  This short line is independently owned running operating about 7 remaining miles between Benson and Curtiss, Arizona that was for many years a much more substantial line under the direction of El Paso & Southwestern (later SP).  

Arkansas Short Line Railroad Guide

Arkansas & Missouri Railroad (reporting mark, AM):   The large A&M has been independently owned since it began service in 1986 over former Frisco property.  The railroad currently operates nearly 140 miles between Fort Smith, Arkansas and Monett, Missouri.  It was long regarded as a haven of classic Alco road-switchers but has since acquired new Electro-Motive SD70ACe models.  To the general public the A&M is a popular excursion railroad offering rides throughout much of the year.  The company's traffic base is highly diversified ranging from paper and lumber to food products and steel.

Arkansas, Louisiana & Mississippi Railroad (reporting mark, ALM):  The AL&M is another G&W property, operating about 53 miles of track between Crossett, Arkansas and Monroe, Louisiana.  The route's history dates back to 1906 and was for years owned by lumber interests, lastly by Georgia-Pacific.  In 2004 G&W purchased the AL&M and the railroad currently moves forest-based products as well as chemicals.

Arkansas Midland Railroad (reporting mark, AKMD):  The Arkansas Midland is a Pinsly-owned short line that operates seven disconnected corridors across the state totaling 125 miles in conjunction with allying-roads the Prescott & Northwestern and Warren & Saline River.  The AM began in 1992 and its traffic base includes forest products, agriculture, aggregates, aluminum, chemicals, and building materials.

Arkansas Southern Railroad (reporting mark, ARS): The Arkansas Southern is a Watco property that began service in 2005, leasing 61 miles from KCS via two disconnected lines (Waldron, Arkansas-Heavener, Oklahoma and Ashdown-Nashville).  Its traffic base is unknown.

Bauxite & Northern Railway (reporting mark, BXN):  The small Bauxite & Northern can trace its history back to 1906 serving the area around Bauxite, Arkansas.  For many years it was owned by the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) but was acquired by RA in 2005.  Today, it is a G&W property operating 6 miles of track and hauls primarily alumina while it also handles a range of other tasks.

Dardanelle & Russellville Railroad (reporting mark, DR):  This historic short line traces its roots back to the Dardanelle & Russellville Railway of 1883.  The system acquired its current name on January 13, 1900.  It is currently owned by Arkansas Shortline Railroads, Inc. and operates about 5 miles from a Union Pacific interchange at Russellville to Dardanelle.  Its traffic base includes pulp-board, plastics, and forest products.

De Queen & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, DQE):  Another historic system, the De Queen & Eastern was first chartered on September 22, 1900.  It would eventually connect Perkins, Arkansas with Valliant, Oklahoma via De Queen.  This main line is still operated today under Patriot Rail, which acquired the railroad from Weyerhaeuser in 2010 albeit now split as two separate railroads.  In total there currently about 91 miles in service (the DQ&E operates as far as the Arkansas state line) with traffic consisting of paper, forest products, grain, and gypsum board (drywall).

Delta Southern Railroad (reporting mark, DSRR):  This independently-owned short line has been in service since 1991, operating two disconnected branches in Louisiana and Arkansas.  Its traffic is highly diversified including grain/agricultural products, cotton, coal, chemicals, forest products, sand, clay, soda ash, and aggregates.

Delta Valley & Southern Railway (reporting mark, DVS):  This small, independent short line operates just two miles of trackage around Wilson.  The property was originally built to serve the timber industry and later was owned by the Frisco.  Today, it is under the direction of Lee Wilson & Company, of which DV&S is a subsidiary.  Just one locomotive is used, GE 45-tonner #50 that switches a local cotton processing plant whereby processed cottonseed is interchanged with BNSF.

East Camden & Highland Railroad (reporting mark, EACH):  Also known as the EACH Railroad this operation has been in service since 1971 when it was incorporated to serve the Shumaker Ordnance Depot at East Camden, Arkansas.  In total the railroad owns slightly more than 47 miles of track, interchanging with UP at Eagle Mills.  Its traffic consists of lumber, paper products, rubber, and chemicals.  The EACH also operates the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant at Doyline, Louisiana.

El Dorado & Wesson Railway (reporting mark, EDW): The historic ED&W traces its roots back to incorporation in 1905.  The road would eventually operate about 10.2 miles from El Dorado to Wesson but nearly 5 miles was abandoned back to Newell in 1959.   Passenger service survived until 1953.  Today, the short line operates 5.5 miles with traffic consisting of petroleum products, chemicals, and medium density fiberboard.

Fordyce & Princeton Railroad (reporting mark, FP):  The Fordyce & Princeton traces its history back to 1890 and currently operates 57 miles between Fordyce and Crossett.  For nearly its entire existence the F&P has moved forest based products and for years was owned by similar interests.  In 2004 Georgia-Pacific sold the system to G&W.

Fort Smith Railroad (reporting mark, FSR):  This short line is a Pioneer Railcorp property, operating 18 miles between Fort Smith and Barling.  The line's history traces back to a Union Pacific branch, spun-off in 1991.  Its traffic currently includes iron/steel, frozen poultry, alcoholic beverages, sand, lumber, pulp board, peanuts, and military movements.

Kiamichi Railroad (reporting mark, KRR):  This large short line operates 261 miles  of track (some of which is trackage rights) running from Hope, Arkansas to west of Durant, Oklahoma along the Red River.  There is also a north-south section running from Paris, Texas to Antlers, Oklahoma.  The route's history traces back to the Frisco, when it was sold in 1987 by Burlington Northern.  RailAmerica acquired the property in 2002 from States Rail before being purchased by G&W in 2012.  Today, traffic consists of coal, lumber, aggregates, minerals, glass, paper, chemicals, cement, pulpwood, feed and food products.

Little Rock & Western Railway (reporting mark, LRWN):  The LR&W operate on a section of the Rock Island's fabled Choctaw Route built by predecessor Choctaw, Oklahoma & Gulf.  It first began service in 1986 it currently operates about 79 miles from Danville, Arkansas to Little Rock.  Traffic includes animal feed, as well as food and forest products.

Little Rock Port Authority Railroad (reporting mark, LRPA):  This locally owned operation has been in service since 1972 operating about 12 miles and connecting with the Port of Little Rock Industrial Park where several various businesses have rail service.  The railroad interchanges with both UP and BNSF.

Louisiana & North West Railroad (reporting mark, LNW):  This historic line dates back to its founding in 1888.  The L&NW eventually grew to 124 miles between McNeil, Arkansas and Natchitoches, Louisiana but this was later cutback to Gibsland.  These 68 miles are still operated under Patriot Rail today, which acquired the property in 2008.

Missouri & Northern Arkansas Railroad (reporting mark, MNA):  This regional system began in 1992, acquiring more than 102 miles from Union Pacific late that year.  For many years it was under RailAmerica before this company was purchased by G&W in 2012.  Today, the M&NA operates nearly 600 miles of track, much of which is leased from UP and BNSF, extending from southeastern Missouri to northern Arkansas.  Its annual carloads exceed 100,000 and range from unit coal trains to general merchandise.

Ouachita Railroad (reporting mark, OUCH):  This short line operates 26 miles between El Dorado, Arkansas and Lille, Louisiana.  It was originally a Rock Island branch, later operated by the South Central Arkansas Railroad from 1982 until the East Camden & Highland Railroad purchased the line in 1983.  In 1990 it was sold to the Arkansas Short Line Railroads, which operates it as the Ouachita Railroad.  Its primary traffic includes lumber, chemicals, and particleboard.

Prescott & Northwestern Railroad (reporting mark, PNW):  The historic P&NW was chartered in 1890 by the the Ozan Lumber Company to serve timber interests north of Prescott.  It eventually reached Daisy with branches serving Cheney and Martin.  Its primary traffic then was forest products but also carried perishables/agriculture and gypsum.  Today, only 5 miles of the original route are still in service.  Today, the property is owned by Pinsly and switches local roofing businesses.

Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, TOE):  The TO&E, also a Patriot Rail subsidiary, operates the other half of the original De Queen & Eastern main line from the Arkansas state line to Valliant, Oklahoma.  Its traffic base is predominantly forest products.

Warren & Saline River Railroad (reporting mark, WSR):  This small short line dates back to 1920 and for many years was owned by the Potlatch Corporation.  Its traffic has always been forest-based (logs, lumber, etc.), which continues today.  The road operates about 8 miles between Cloquet and Warren and has been owned by Pinsly since 2010.

California Short Line Railroad Guide

California Northern Railroad (reporting mark, CFNR):  This large short line operates 261 miles of former SP trackage leased by UP from Vallejo to Los Molinos via Sacramento.  There are also a number of branches served.  The road carries a wide range of freight including food products, stone, petroleum products, and chemicals amongst others while moving more than 26,000 carloads annually.  It was originally owned by the Park-Sierra Rail Group, later sold to RailAmerica in 2002, and G&W acquired these assets in 2012.

Central Oregon & Pacific Railroad (reporting mark, CORP):  This Class II, regional operates the Southern Pacific's former Siskiyou Line running from Eugene, Oregon to Northern California covering some 389 miles.  It was long operated by RailAmerica before being purchased by G&W in 2012.  The road handles a wide-range of commodities and moves roughly 17,000 carloads annually.

San Diego & Arizona Eastern Railway (reporting mark SDAE):  The venerable SD&AE has had a long, on-again, off-again history that once operated 146 miles between San Diego and El Centro, California where the line briefly enters into Mexico at various points.  Originally known as the San Diego & Arizona chartered in 1906 it acquired its current name in 1933 following Southern Pacific ownership (the SP once operated a named train over the route known as the Imperial).  It sold the line in 1979 to local governments.  Today, about 108 miles are still in use with freight service provided by the Pacific Imperial Railroad (reporting mark PIRR) between the Mexican border at a location known as Division to Plaster City, California (70 miles) while the San Diego & Imperial Valley Railroad (reporting mark, SDIY) provides service between San Diego and San  Ysidro/El Cajon.

Central California Traction (reporting mark CCT):  This historic road traces its roots back to an interurban, chartered in 1905.  By 1910 the Traction had opened between Stockton and Sacramento with a branch to Lodi using a predominantly 1,200-volt DC electrified system.  In 1946 the wires removed in favor of diesels.  Today, it operates only the line to Lodi is in service moving food, steel, lumber, and other general freight while the entire corridor to Sacramento remains in place for possible future use.

Los Angeles Junction Railway (reporting mark, LJL):  The Los Angeles Junction is owned by BNSF Railway and has been in service since 1923.  It provides switching/terminal service for the communities of Vernon, Maywood, Bell and Commerce near Los Angeles.  It owns in-total about 64 miles of track.

Modesto & Empire Traction (reporting mark, MET):  Another former interurban-turned-short line the M&ET dates back to its incorporation in 1911 where it eventually operated 5 miles from Modesto to Empire albeit the road never electrified.  Today, this original route is still in service (altogether the M&ET serves about 40 miles of tracks, including spurs and sidings) and it move a wide range of freight including food products, wine, syrup, plastics, paper products and manufacturing commodities.

Oakland Terminal Railway (reporting mark, OTR):  The history of the Oakland Terminal traces back to interurbans constructed at the turn of the 20th century to serve the Bay Area.  These eventually became known as the Key System around 1938.  The freight system, known as the Oakland Terminal Railroad, was jointly acquired by the Santa Fe and Western Pacific in 1943.  It was renamed as the Oakland Terminal Railway, which it remains today.  The Terminal continues to provide switching work for its parent companies around Oakland, operating about 10 miles of track.

Pacific Harbor Line (reporting mark, PHL):  This terminal road began in 1998 from the remnants of the Harbor Belt Line (the HBL was a long-time joint subsidiary of Santa Fe, Southern Pacific, and Union Pacific) serving the Port Of Los Angeles/Long Beach.  It is currently owned by Anacostia & Pacific and operates about 18 miles of track with a total of 59 miles.  It handles a wide rang of switching assignments, mostly involving intermodal at the ports.

Pacific Sun Railroad (reporting mark, PSRR):  The Pacific Sun was Watco's first railroad subsidiary in California, which began service in 2008.  It utilizes about 62 miles of trackage rights over BNSF between Miramar and San Onofre with a branch to Escondido.  Its traffic base consists of  corn, soy, lumber, plastic pellets, beer, and other movements.

Quincy Railroad (reporting mark, QRR):  This little short line serves a 3.27 terminal switching road around the town of Quincy.  It began as the Quincy & Eastern Railway during July of 1909, later changed to the Quincy Western Railway three months later.  It was reorganized as the Quincy Railroad on November 9, 1917.  The road currently operates with an SW1200 and SW7 switcher (some of its original equipment is preserved as the Western Pacific Railroad Museum).  Owned by Sierra Pacific, it handles about 1,000 annual carloads of forest products and interchanges with Union Pacific at Quincy Junction.

Richmond Pacific Railroad (reporting mark, RPRC): The Richmond Pacific is a terminal line owned by the Levin-Richmond Terminal Corporation, which has been in service since 1950.  It serves the port at Richmond as well as local nearby industries and operates about 10 miles of track with traffic including stone, ores, lumber, food products and petroleum products.

Sacramento Valley Railroad (reporting mark, SAV):  This short line is a Patriot Rail operation, providing switching services to the McClellan Business Park, a 3,000-acre business park located near Sacramento, California.  It currently operates about 7 miles of track, interchanging with UP and BNSF.

Santa Cruz, Big Trees & Pacific Railway (reporting mark, SCBG):  This operates provides both freight service and excursion trains on the former Southern Pacific between Olympia and Santa Cruz, about 9 miles, where it interchanges with Iowa Pacific's Santa Cruz & Monterey Bay Railroad. It was originally built as the
Santa Cruz & Felton Railroad, a 3-foot, narrow-gauge logging system chartered in 1874 until SP acquired the property in 1885.  Today, lumber remains the primary source of traffic.

Santa Maria Valley Railroad (reporting mark, SMV):  This little short line has remained independent and family-owned since it was chartered in 1911.  Today, only about 14 miles of the original system remain in operation, connecting
Guadalupe (where it interchanges with UP) as well as Santa Maria and Santa Maria Valley.  Until 1950 the road ran as far as Roadamite (23 miles in all) but was cutback to Guadalupe at that time. It currently handles about 2,000 carloads annually including asphalt, fertilizer, food products, lumber, gypsum board (drywall), lumber, machinery, petroleum products, plastic, and scrap iron.

San Joaquin Valley Railroad (reporting mark, SJVR):  This short line is a G&W property operating some 417 miles of track on two disconnected sections between Bakersfield and Fresno.  It began in 1992 under Kyle Railways ownership acquiring several former Southern Pacific branches.  In 1997 the lines were taken over by States Rail before being purchased by RailAmerica in 2002, subsequently acquired by G&W in 2012.  Today, traffic includes petroleum products, cattle feed, building products, tomato paste, consumer products, dry and liquid fertilizer products.

Sierra Northern Railway (reporting mark, SERA):  The Sierra Northern was formed in 2003 through the merger of Yolo Shortline and Sierra Railroad, the latter of which was a classic short line dating back to 1897 and for many years hauled forest products.  Today, the system operates about 105 miles of track with traffic consisting of lumber and related products, grain and related products, gypsum, wallboard, canned goods, plastics, chemicals, steel, ethanol and propane.  Tourist operations are also carried out on the Sierra Northern.

Stockton Terminal & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, STE): The ST&E was originally incorporated on October 29, 1908 it was originally envisioned as an interurban but lacked the funds for electrified operation.  In 1910 it opened its main line to Bellota.  Today, the road operates about 25 miles from Stockton to near Linden, serving various industries along the way.  Some of its current traffic includes agriculture, asphalt, cement, chemicals, food processing, lumber, and steel.

Trona Railway (reporting mark, TRC):  This historic road has long shipped soda ash since it was originally incorporated on March 12, 1913.  It operates 30.5 miles from Trona to Searles where it interchanges with Union Pacific.  Its current traffic, aside from soda ash, includes sulfuric acid, salt cake, coal, military equipment and minerals.

Tulare Valley Railroad (reporting mark, TVRR):  This short line began service in late 1992 over former Santa Fe branches in the San Joaquin Valley totaling 158 miles.  Today, only 6.1 miles is operated between Ducor and Ultra with services contracted out to the San Joaquin Valley Railroad.  There is currently only one customer, Cannella Chemical.

Ventura County Railroad (reporting mark, VCRR):  This short line is another property of G&W and operates 17 miles south of Oxnard.  It began service in 1998 under RailAmerica and currently hauls automobiles, paper, petroleum and wood pulp handling about 2,000 carloads annually.

West Isle Line, Inc. (reporting mark, WFS):  This private short line is owned by Western Farm Service for its operations at Alpaugh.  It runs 5.25 miles to a connection with BNSF at Stoil and has been in service since 1998.  The primary traffic is chemicals for fertilizer, moving about 400 carloads annually.

Yreka Western Railroad (reporting mark, YW):  This historic road traces its history back to 1889 in Northern California.  It currently operates about 9 miles of track from Montague to Yreka where primary traffic consists of wood chips and forest products.

Colorado Short Line Railroad Guide

Cimarron Valley Railroad (reporting mark, CVR):  This large short line operates 254 miles of former Santa Fe trackage in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Colorado.  There are two disconnected lines; one from Dodge City, Kansas to Boise City, Oklahoma while the other runs from Satanta, Kansas to Springfield, Colorado.  Much of the trackage is 10 mph and weed-covered.  Its traffic base is primarily agriculture.

Colorado & Wyoming Railway (reporting mark, CW):  This historic road has a history dating back to 1899.  Today it operates just 4.5 miles of its original network, serving the area around Pueblo.  Its current traffic includes coal, ore and steel products where it interchanges with both UP and BNSF.

Denver Rock Island Railroad (reporting mark, DRIR):  This privately owned short line first began service in 1993 on trackage once owned by the Rock Island.  It currently serves three yard near Denver known as the North Washington Park, Stockyards, and Airlawn.  They currently operate with a few Electro-Motive switchers.

Great Western Railway Of Colorado (reporting mark, GWR):  Not to be confused with the English road carrying the same name, this Great Western dates back to its incorporation on October 16, 1901 by the Great Western Sugar Company to serve its sugar plants in Loveland and Greeley.  For many years the railroad moved sugar beets, molasses, processed sugar, and related products.  It also handled passenger business until 1927.  It remained under private ownership for many years before it was acquired by OmniTRAX.  Today, the Great Western operates about 80 miles from Greeley to points west, north, and south.  Its traffic base is no longer sugar-related but it moves a diversified range of freight including agricultural products, paper, plastics, sand, forest products, brewing grains, beer, and miscellaneous by-products.  Of note, its original 2-10-0 Decapod #90 currently operates on the Strasburg Railroad.

Kyle Railroad (reporting mark, KYLE):  This large, Class II, regional system operates more than 500 miles of which most is the Rock Island's former main line between Chicago and Denver.  It also owns some branch trackage north and west of Salina, Kansas with a very short segment reaching into southern Nebraska.  It was a long-time RailAmerica property before that company was purchased by G&W in 2012.  Its current traffic includes wheat, soybeans, milo maize, alcohols, siding asphalt, and roofing granules handling more than 21,000 carloads annually.

Nebraska, Kansas & Colorado Railway (reporting mark, NKCR):  This Class II, regional is another OmniTRAX property and operates roughly 559 miles of disconnected track predominantly based in Kansas but also reaches Sterling, Colorado.  It has been in service since 1996 with traffic largely made up of coal movements while it also handles wheat, corn, and fertilizer.

Connecticut Short Line Railroad Guide

Branford Steam Railroad (reporting mark, BRFD):  This independent, industrial road has been in service since 1903 and currently serves a stone quarry at North Branford, Connecticut, operating just over 6 miles and interchanging with the Providence & Worcester.

Central New England Railroad (reporting mark, CNZR):  This small short line has been in service since 1995 operating over 8.5 miles of the old Central New England Railway between Hartford and Bloomfield (acquired in 1999) as well as utilizing ex-New Haven trackage from East Windsor Hill to State Line (13.5 miles).  The road interchanges with the Connecticut Southern.

Connecticut Southern Railroad (reporting mark, CSO):  This short line traces its history back to 1996 when it acquired former New Haven trackage from Conrail that year.  In 2000 it was purchased by RailAmerica whose assets were taken over by the G&W in 2012.  Today, the road operates about 42 miles of track hauling such freight as steel beams, construction debris, lumber, malt liquors and pulpboard.

Housatonic Railroad (reporting mark, HRRC):  The historic Housatonic Railroad has been around since its chartering in 1840.  It eventually grew into a rather substantial system serving western Connecticut, and southwestern Massachusetts.  It was long part of New Haven's Berkshire Division since first leased in 1892 but "regained" its independence more than 90 years later when Conrail sold sections of the original to a new Housatonic Railroad in 1983.  Today, the short line operates much of the original route between New Haven and Pittsfield with a western extension to Newburgh, New York.  It remains independently owned moving a wide variety of freight.  Additionally, there has been of initiating commuter rail service and the Berkshire Scenic Railway Museum hosts excursions on a section of the property.

New England Central Railroad (reporting mark, NECR): The New England Central has been in service since 1995 when it acquired the assets of the historic Central Vermont Railway, sold by Canadian National that year to RailTex Corporation which subsequently renamed the property.  This company was acquired by RailAmerica in 2000 which was purchased by G&W in 2012.  Today, the Class II, regional operates 394 miles and handles nearly 40,000 carloads annually. Its freight is highly diversified including lumber, panels & plywood, poles, newsprint, printing paper, compressed gas, chemicals, fuel oils, road salt, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, fabricated metals, resins, TOFC/COFC, finished vehicles, feed mill ingredients, machinery and equipment, recyclables, ash, construction debris, foodstuffs and non-metallic minerals.

Pan Am Railways (reporting mark, PAR):  The Pan Am is the renamed Guilford Transportation system.  These large regional has served much of New England since 1981 when it began acquiring such classic system as Maine Central, Boston & Maine, Portland Terminal, and Springfield Terminal.  In 2006 it changed its name to Pan Am Railways.  Today, it operates roughly 1,700 miles with primary traffic including grain, coal, sand/aggregates, food products, lumber, paper/pulpwood, chemicals and plastics, petroleum, processed minerals, metals, scrap metal, automobiles, and intermodal.

Providence & Worcester Railroad (reporting mark, PW):  The P&W is another historic system spun-off following the Penn Central collapse.  It began in 1847, opening its original line between Worcester and Millville, Massachusetts in September that year; a month later it was completed to Providence on October 20th. After nearly 50 years of independence the much large New Haven system leased the railroad for 99 years on July 1, 1892.  After the PC bankruptcy the road regained its independence in early 1973.  Today, it serves more than 140 customers and moves nearly 35,000 carloads annually as a Class II, regional.

Delaware Short Line Railroad Guide

Delaware Coast Line Railroad (reporting mark, DCLR):  This short line has been in service since 1982 operating about 25 miles of track in Sussex County (the Milton Branch and Lewes Branch) that were long part of the Pennsylvania Railroad's Delmarva Lines (originally part of the Queen Anne's Railroad of 1894).  The road interchanges with Norfolk Southern in Ellendale and Georgetown.

East Penn Railroad (reporting mark, ESPN):  This privately-owned short line operates over primarily disconnected branches in southeastern Pennsylvania which also reach into northern Delaware.  The history of the lines trace back to the PRR and Reading, sold by Conrail in the 1990s.  The current road was formed in 2007 through the merger of the East Penn Railway and Penn Eastern Rail Lines.  Currently, it operates 114 miles of track and handles a wide variety of freight.

Maryland & Delaware Railroad (reporting mark, MDDE):  The Maryland & Delaware has been in service since 1977 when it acquired former PRR branches in Maryland and Delaware (more of the Delmarva Lines) soon after Conrail was formed.  The road currently operates 120 miles of track on four different branches (the Seafood Line, Centreville Line, Chestertown Line, and Snow Hill Line) moving such freight as agriculture, food products, steel, petroleum products, fertilizer, and forest products.

Wilmington & Western Railroad (reporting mark, WWRC):  This operation is well-known for its excursions hauled by steam locomotives, utilizing a former Baltimore & Ohio branch between Wilmington and Hockessin.  It was formed in 1982 after acquiring the remaining 10.2-mile line from the B&O, renaming it to the original railroad that chartered the route in 1867.  Currently, the W&W handles freight assignments on an as-needed basis.

Florida Short Line Railroad Guide

Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway (reporting mark, AGR):  The is a G&W property operating nearly 350 miles of track running from eastern Mississippi, through western Alabama, and finally terminating at Pensacola, Florida.  The route's heritage traces back to the eastern extent of the St. Louis-San Francisco's network and today the railroad handles more than 61,000 carloads annually including coal, iron and steel, chemicals, scrap iron, pulp and paper, and limestone.

AN Railway (reporting mark, AN):  This system was long known as the historic Apalachicola Northern, first chartered on April 7, 1903.  It would eventually connect Chattahoochee to Apalachicola with an extension to Port St. Joe in the Panhandle.  In 2002 the long-independent system was acquired by Rail Management Corporation, renaming it as the AN Railway.  This firm was subsequently purchased by G&W in 2005.  Today, the short line operates 96 miles of trackage and hauls chemicals and forest products.

Bay Line Railroad (reporting mark, BAYL):  The Bay Line was historically the Atlanta & St. Andrews Bay Railway which dated back to the early 20th century.  It is currently a Genesee & Wyoming property operating more than 100 miles of trackage between the Florida Panhandle and southern Alabama.  It has been a G&W-owned since 2005 and transports a wide range of freight.

First Coast Railroad (FCRD):  This short line began in 2005 over former Seaboard Air Line property leased from CSX running from Fernandina Beach, Florida to Seals, Georgia (slightly north of Kingsland) via Yulee, Florida where it interchanges with CSX.  The 32-mile line is operated by G&W and handles chemicals, coal, forest products, metals, pulp/paper products, and petroleum products.

Florida Central Railroad (reporting mark, FCEN):  This Pinsly property has been in operation since 1986 when it acquired from a CSX the remaining section of a former Atlantic Coast Line route northwest of Orlando.  Today, the Central's only connection is at Orlando, running as far as Umatilla with branches to Winter Garden and Sorrento.  In total the road operates about 68 miles 

Florida East Coast Railway (reporting mark, FEC):  The state's most famous railroad, the Florida East Coast began during September of 1895 as the vision of Henry Flagler.  It would eventually connect Jacksonville with Miami, long before Florida grew into the commercial and tourism destination is so well known for today giving the FEC the strategic advantage of serving the state's populated East Coast, which it still enjoys today.  The railroad, of course, is also legendary for having constructed the failed Key West Extension, destroyed during the infamous Labor Day Hurricane of 1935.  Today, the FEC handles a wide variety of freight and is reentering the passenger business as well.

Florida Midland Railroad (reporting mark, FMID):  Another Pinsly line this short line operates to short, disconnected lines totaling 28 miles between Frostproof and West Lake Whales as well as between Winter Haven and Gordonville.  It has been in service since 1987 and provides primarily transload services.

Florida Northern Railroad (reporting mark, FNOR):  This short line is the largest Pinsly property in Florida operating 104 miles via two unconnected routes, Chandler to Lowell as well as from High Springs to Red Level Junction.  The history of the property traces back to the ACL.

Florida West Coast Railroad (reporting mark, FWCR):  This small, independent short line operates only a short segment of remaining trackage around Newberry.  The system began on December 13, 1987 purchasing 13 miles of former ACL property from CSX.  There were originally two sections; from Newberry to Cross City as well as a branch south to Chiefland via Wilcox Junction.  Most of this was abandoned in 2004.  It is currently owned by CSF Acquisition, Inc.

Georgia & Florida Railway (reporting mark, GFRR):  This large short line operates around 264 miles of trackage running from Albany, Georgia to Foley, Florida.  The route's history dates back to the Southern.  OmniTRAX acquired the property in 2005 from Georgia & Florida RailNet, renaming it as the Georgia & Florida Railway.  It currently handles a variety of freight including wood pulp, beer, ethanol, agricultural commodities, limestone/aggregate, and other traffic.

Port of Manatee Railroad (no reporting mark): This privately-operated terminal railroad is based in Port Manatee serving the local port.  It operates with one switcher and owns about 8 miles of track, interchanging with CSX.

Seminole Gulf Railway (reporting mark, SGLR):  This operation is well known by the public for operating excursions and murder mystery dinner trains.  It began operations in November of 1987 by acquiring former ACL and SAL property from CSX.  Its two lines include the following; one runs from Arcadia to North Naples (80 miles) while another stretches from Oneco to Sarasota (about 25 miles in all). 

South Central Florida Express, Inc. (reporting mark, SCXF):  Formerly known as South Central Florida Express this privately-owned short line operates 156 miles of track in South Florida.  It was long owned by the Brandywine Valley Railroad, which sold the property to the United States Sugar Corporation on September 17, 1994.  Today, the railroad hauls nearly 120,000 carloads annually.

Talleyrand Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, TTR):  This small terminal road operates just 2 miles and serves the Jacksonville Port Authority while interchanging with CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern.  It is a G&W property hauling a wide range of products including automobiles, chemicals, intermodal containers, and pulp/paper.

Georgia Short Line Railroad Guide

Athens Line, LLC (reporting mark, ABR): This short line is operated under contract to the Great Walton Railroad albeit its assets are owned by the city of Athens.  The road operates 38 miles of former Central of Georgia trackage between Madison and Junior State via Athens.

Chattahoochee Bay Railroad (reporting mark, CHAT):  The Chattahoochee Bay is a 25-mile short line serving Dothan, Alabama and stretching just slightly into the Georgia state line at Hilton where it interchanges with NS.  The property is former CoG lines.  It is owned by the Genesee & Wyoming (since 2006) with primary products including chemicals, forest products, and food and feed products.

Chattooga & Chickamauga Railway (reporting mark, CCKY):  The C&C is a Genesee & Wyoming subsidiary operating 49 miles from Chattanooga, Tennessee south to Lyerly on trackage originally owned by the Central of Georgia.  Its freight currently consists of chemicals, metals and plastics.

Chattahoochee Industrial Railroad (reporting mark, CIRR): This former Georgia-Pacific property was acquired by G&W in 2004.  It currently operates 15 miles connecting with CSX and Norfolk Southern lines near the Chattahoochee River.  Its traffic currently includes chemicals, coal, forest products, steel and scrap.

First Coast Railroad (FCRD):  This short line began in 2005 over former Seaboard Air Line property leased from CSX running from Fernandina Beach, Florida to Seals, Georgia (slightly north of Kingsland) via Yulee, Florida where it interchanges with CSX.  The 32-mile line is operated by G&W and handles chemicals, coal, forest products, metals, pulp/paper products, and petroleum products.

Fulton County Railway (reporting mark, FCR):  This OmniTRAX property began service in 2004, currently operating about 20 miles of trackage serving the Fulton County Industrial Park.  It moves a wide range of freight handling about 8,000 carloads annually.

Georgia & Florida Railway (reporting mark, GFRR):  This large short line operates around 264 miles of trackage running from Albany, Georgia to Foley, Florida.  The route's history dates back to the Southern.  OmniTRAX acquired the property in 2005 from Georgia & Florida RailNet, renaming it as the Georgia & Florida Railway.  It currently handles a variety of freight including wood pulp, beer, ethanol, agricultural commodities, limestone/aggregate, and other traffic.

Georgia Central Railway (reporting mark, GC): This large short line is a property of G&W (since 2005) over trackage formerly of SCL heritage.  The route is 171 miles in length connecting Macon with the coast at Savannah.  Its traffic is highly diversified and includes coal, chemicals, agriculture, food products, forest products, minerals/aggregates, plastics, and pulp/paper products.

Georgia Northeastern Railroad (reporting mark, GNRR):  This privately-owned short line uses part of the former Louisville & Nashville's famed "Hook & Eye" route.  It currently runs from Marietta northward to McCaysville near the Tennessee state line, more than 100 miles in length.  Service began around 1990 and traffic currently consists of timber, grain, poultry, and marble products.  The railroad is also noted for hosting the popular Blue Ridge Scenic Railway on a section of the property.

Georgia Southwestern Railroad (reporting mark, GSWR):  This large short line is primarily based in western Georgia but also extends into eastern Alabama at Eufaula.  The road operates more than 230 miles of track and handles more than 13,000 carloads annually amongst a wide range of freight.  It has been a G&W property since 2008.

Georgia Southern Railway (reporting  mark, GS):  This Pioneer Railcorp property was formerly known as the Georgia Midland prior to 2010.  The system currently operates three disconnected lines running from Perry to Roberta (30 miles), Swainsboro to Midville (16 miles), and Meter to Dover (28 miles).  Its current freight includes sand, asphalt, plastics, lumber, grain, scrap, fertilizer and stone aggregates.

Georgia Woodlands Railroad (reporting mark, GWRC):  This short line, currently owned by OmniTRAX, has been in service since 1988 operating just over 17 miles between Washington and Barnett. It currently handles less than 1,000 annual carloads that includes plastic pellets, wood chips, lumber, forest products, and petroleum gases.

Golden Isles Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, GITM):  This small terminal road began service in 1998 over trackage formerly owned by the Colonel's Island Railroad.  It operates a total of 13 miles on main line and primarily serves the Georgia Port Authority at Brunswick.  It interchanges with both CSX and NS with primary traffic including automobiles, chemicals, food products, and animal feed.

Great Walton Railroad (reporting mark, GRWR):  The small, independent Great Walton has been in service since 1987 and currently operates 10 miles between Monroe and Social Circle.  The trackage was once owned by the Georgia Railroad, part of the West Point Route.  The short line currently moves more than 3,500 carloads annually with traffic including clay, feldspar, grain, machinery, fertilizer, woodchips, plastics, pulpwood, and silica.

Hartwell Railroad (reporting mark, HRT):  This historic short line dates back to its chartering in 1878 as a three-foot, narrow-gauge that would eventually connect Hartwell and Bowersville (10 miles).  The Southern acquired the property in 1902, converting it to standard-gauge but resold it to private owners in 1924.  Today, the Hartwell is contracted out to the Great Walton which operates freight service on the line.  Additionally, the road also now owns the former NS route between Toccoa and Elberton (48 miles).

Heart of Georgia Railroad (reporting mark, HOG):  This railroad is privately owned by Atlantic Western Transportation. It has been in service since 1999 operating 177 miles between Mahrt, Alabama and Vidalia, Georgia on trackage once owned by the Seaboard Air Line.  Its freight ranges from agriculture to petroleum products. Aside from freight service the line also hosts the popular SAM Shortline excursions.

Riceboro Southern Railway (reporting mark, RSOR):  The Riceboro Southern operates between Richmond Hill (south of Savannah) and Riceboro on trackage once owned by SAL.  Its freight currently consists of chemicals and pulp/paper products.

Sandersville Railroad (reporting mark, SAN):  The privately owned Sandersville Railroad, also known as the "Kaolin Road," dating back to its chartering in 1893 soon completing its route from Sandersville to Tennille, where it interchanged with the Central of Georgia (3 miles).  For many years traffic was sparse but grew prodigiously after 1938 when the Champion Paper & Fiber Company decided to begin processing its kaolin deposits located in the local Washington County region.  A plant was built in Sandersville and today kaolin remains an important source of freight while other commodities include plastic pellets, ethanol, turkey feed, and chipwood.

Savannah Port Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, SAPT):  This small terminal road is owned by G&W that first began service on June 9, 1998 over property formerly owned by Savannah State Docks Railroad.  It operates about 18 miles of main line track in the Savannah area with primary freight including chemicals, food products, intermodal containers, and pulp/paper hauling more than 46,000 carloads annually.

St. Marys Railroad (reporting mark, SM):  The historic St. Marys Railroad has been in operation since it was renamed in 1939 from property originally known as the St. Marys & Kingsland Railroad of 1865.  The small line has always served the St. Marys area, running to Kinglands (10 miles) where it currently interchanges with the First Coast Railroad.  For many years the company served a burgeoning paper mill and later the U.S. Army's Kings Bay ammunition storage facility.  It is presently owned by the Boatright Companies and has no known sources of freight revenue.  However, in recent years the company has been able to launch a successful excursion service.

Valdosta Railway (reporting mark, VR):  The Valdosta Railway has been in service since 1992 running from Clyattville to Valdosta (10 miles) interchanging with both CSX and NS.  It has been under G&W ownership since 2005 and currently hauls chemicals, food products, animal feed, forest products, plastics, and pulp/paper products.

Idaho Short Line Railroad Guide

Boise Valley Railroad (reporting mark, BVRR):  This short line is part of the Watco's family of railroads that began service in November of 2009.  The road operates 36 miles of disconnected property, the Wilder Branch (11 miles between Wilder and Caldwell) and the Boise Cut-off (25 miles between Nampa and near Boise).  There are numerous customers served on the lines with primary freight including potatoes, lumber, fertilizer, and fuels.

Bountiful Grain & Craig Mountain Railroad (reporting mark, BGCM):  This short line is currently owned by Railroad Materials Salvage although it began operations in 1998 under Camas Prairie RailNet.  It operates the former Camas Prairie Railroad between Spalding and Cottonwood, about 52 miles.

Eastern Idaho Railroad (reporting mark, EIRR):  This Watco-owned short line first began service on November 21, 1993 operating several former Union Pacific branches in southeastern Idaho.  There are two, disconnected segments; one runs from Idaho Falls northeast to Ashton (with various spurs) and another connects Minidoka and Martin with points west reaching Wendell and Buhl.  In all the road operates about 270 miles and moves roughly 35,000 carloads annually.

Great Northwest Railroad (reporting mark, GRNW):  This Watco property (since 2004) operates 77 miles of the former Camas Prairie Railroad between Lewiston, Idaho and Riparia, Washington.  Its current traffic consists of lumber, bark, paper and tissue, agricultural products, industrial/farm chemicals, scrap iron and frozen vegetables. 

Idaho, Northern & Pacific Railroad (reporting mark, INPR): This short line is owned by the Rio Grande Pacific Corporation and began service on November 15, 1993.  It operates two, disconnected branches of Union Pacific heritage (originally Oregon Short Line and Payette Valley Railroad); one runs from Payette to Cascade, Idaho while the other connects La Grande and Elgin.  In total the IN&P owns about 121 miles (additional mileage is leased from UP between Nampa and Weiser, Idaho) with traffic including agricultural products, forest products, and chemicals.

Montana Rail Link (reporting mark, MRL):  This large, Class II regional has been in service since 1987 when it acquired a large segment of the former Northern Pacific main line between Montana and Washington.  Today, the road operates between Huntley, Montana to Sand Point, Idaho with trackage rights stretching to Spokane, Washington.  There are also a handful of branches under its ownership.  In all, MRL owns more than 900 miles and moves more than 410,000 carloads annually.

Pend Oreille Valley Railroad (reporting mark, POVA):  This short line is owned by the Port of Pend Oreille (since 1984, and prior to that time, Kyle Railways) and operates the Milwaukee Road's former Metaline Falls Branch between Metaline Falls and Newport, Washington.  It also currently leases from BNSF trackage between Newport, Washington and Dover, Idaho while interchanging with the Class I at nearby Sand Point, Idaho.

Palouse River & Coulee City Railroad (reporting mark, PCC):  The PR&CC is a Watco property that operates 202 miles of disconnected lines in southeastern Washington, western Idaho, and northeastern Oregon.  All of the lines were acquired from Union Pacific.  Its traffic consists of wheat, lentils, and barley while moving about 4,000 carloads annually.

St. Maries River Railroad (reporting mark, STMA):  This interesting short line traces its history to the abandonment of the Milwaukee Road's Pacific Extension in Idaho.  It began service during May of 1980, owned by the Potlatch Corporation, and operated the Milwaukee's former main line between Plummer Junction and Avery, 64 miles, as well as most of the Elk River Branch between St. Maries and Bovill, 52 miles.  Its connection was at Plummer Junction with Union Pacific, which remains the case today.  Then, as it is now, traffic consisted entirely of forest products.  In 1986 it lost a fight with the U.S. Forestry Service which condemned the right-of-way between St. Maries and Avery (45 miles) for conversion into a highway.  Since 2010 it has been privately owned by the Williams Group.  The railroad currently operates about 71 miles with traffic consisting of lumber, plywood, veneer, logs, and inbound shipments of magnesium chlorite.

Washington & Idaho Railway (reporting mark, WIR): The Washington Idaho Railway is a privately-owned short line that serves the area south of Spokane, Washington and stretches as far east as Harvard, Idaho with another short segment extending to Moscow.  The property (former Milwaukee Road and Northern Pacific) is owned by the Washington Department of Transportation, which leases the corridor to the Washington & Idaho.  Its traffic consists of agriculture products, largely grain/wheat.

Illinois Short Line Railroad Guide

Alton & Southern Railway (reporting mark, ALS):  The historic Alton & Southern dates back to 1910 as the Alton & Southern Railroad.  It was incorporated by the Aluminum Company of East St. Louis (later Aluminum Company of America or Alcoa) to provide better switching/terminal service at its plant in East St. Louis.  In 1968 the system was jointly acquired by Chicago & North Western and Missouri Pacific, which renamed it as the Alton & Southern Railway (and acquired its current logo using a combination of its owners' designs).  In 1972 the C&NW sold its interest to the Cotton Belt, a Southern Pacific subsidiary.  Today, the A&S is wholly-owned by Union Pacific, which has since acquired all of the previously mentioned railroads.

Belt Railway of Chicago (reporting mark, BRC):  The history Belt Railway is a long-time terminal switching carrier serving the Chicago area that traces its roots back to 1882.  Today, it continues to provide these services within the Windy City operating 28 main line miles and a total of 300 miles in all where it interchanges with every major railroad in the region (including six of the seven, current Class Is).  Its primary terminal is Clearing Yard.

Bloomer Shippers Connecting Railroad (reporting mark, BLOL): This road, also known as "The Bloomer Line," has been in service since 1985 when it acquired the Illinois Central Gulf's line between Colfax to Kempton.  It later purchased a section of former Wabash property between Strawn and Gibson City from NS in 1990.  Its traffic currently consists of grain, fertilizer, plastics, corn, soybeans, wheat, and lumber.

Burlington Junction Railway (reporting mark, BJRY):  This small terminal-like railroad operates four, very short disconnected lines in Iowa, Missouri, and Illinois.  It began operations in 1985 and its traffic currently consists of agriculture products, chemicals, and fertilizer handling about 3,000 carloads annually.  To railfans the railroad is well-known for operating a set of rare Alco C415 switchers (#701-702), few of which were ever built and even fewer that remain operational.

Central Illinois Railroad (reporting mark, CIRY):  This small short line, owned by the Railroad Services Group, has been in service since 2000 and leases trackage near Peoria from BNSF for switching and terminal service of local customers.

Chicago, SouthShore & South Bend Railroad (reporting mark, CSS):  This historic system traces its roots back to an interurban.  On December 2, 1901 the Chicago & Indiana Air Line Railway was incorporated to connect East Chicago and Indiana Harbor, a distance of about three and a half miles. In 1904 the railroad reincorporated as the Chicago, Lake Shore & South Bend Railway to better reflect its intentions of connecting East Chicago with South Bend, a distance of about 67 miles.  By 1908 the original route between East Chicago and South Bend was opened and completely electrified operating on a 6,600-volt, alternating current (AC) system (700 volts within city limits).  In 1925 it was acquired by Sam Insull which formed the Chicago, South Shore & South Bend Railroad to acquire the assets of the earlier carrier.  While the CSS&SB became noted and derived significant revenue from passenger/commuter service it also built up a substantial freight business, which eventually superseded the former.  In 1989 the South Shore was able to completely drop passenger service, handed over to the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District.  Today, the road is owned by the Anacostia & Pacific Company, continuing to operate its original main line with traffic highly diversified.

Chicago Port Railroad (reporting mark, none):  This small switching/terminal line began service in 2006 operating just 1.3 miles serving the Calumet River Yard and local transload facility at Chicago's Torrence Avenue and 117th Street.  It connects with Chicago Rail Link.

Chicago Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, CTM):  This road is a Iowa Pacific operation, utilizing former Milwaukee Road trackage in northwest Chicago.  It acts as a terminal/switching line while also offering car storage capabilities and has been in service since early 2007.

Chicago Rail Link (reporting mark, CRL):  The Chicago Rail Link is a division of OmniTRAX and operates 72 miles of trackage along the South Side of Chicago.  Along with switching services the road's customers include BP Amoco, Agrifine, Cargill, Nidera, ADM, ARRO Corporation, Great Northern Lumber, Horsehead Metal Management, Leavitt Tube, and Ozinga/Midwest Marine.

Coffeen & Western Railroad (reporting mark, CAEG):  This privately owned short line, created on February 5, 2004 is a division of the Ameren Corporation to serve its power plant at Coffeen, Illinois.  It interchanges with BNSF and UP at Walshville and the line is 13 miles in length.

Crab Orchard & Egyptian Railroad (reporting mark, COER): The CO&E has a fascinating history.  It first began service on July 2, 1971 operated by the American Rail Heritage Ltd. as an excursion, tourist line from the Illinois Central depot in Marion to nearby Ordill and back.  The road utilized a 2-4-2T #5 to pull its trains.  Within a few years it acquired a much larger steamer to meet the growing demand of visitors, Roberval & Saguenay 2-8-0 #17.  However, before the road could restore the engine a fire destroyed the depot at Marion on June 13, 1977.  The incident also destroyed two of the road's coaches and main offices in the building.  With its future in limbo, fate stepped in; the Illinois Central Gulf sold CO&E the entire property and trackage on October 18th that year.  With its new assets the railroad turned to freight service for continued operation, using 2-4-2 #5.  This move made it the very last carrier to use steam power in regular freight service.  Since then steam has been retired but freight has grown steadily.  The company currently owns an SW1 switcher (#6), named the William "Bill" E. Schreiber as well as a pair of SW1200s (#1136, the City Of Herrin, and #1161, the Marion Ross).  It still operates the 8.5 miles between Marion and Ordill with traffic including grain, fertilizer,lumber, coal, paper, steel, oil products, chemicals, scrap iron and manufactured goods.

Decatur Junction Railway (reporting mark, DT): This short line, a Pioneer Railcorp property, first began service during September of 1993 on 38 miles of trackage between 38 miles of track between Assumption and Cisco, Illinois.  Its traffic consists primarily of grain, fertilizer and plastics.

Eastern Illinois Railroad (reporting mark, EIRC): The privately-owned Eastern Illinois has been in operation since April of 1991 when it acquired a section of the former Nickel Plate Road between Neoga and Metcalf, Illinois a distance of 53 miles.  It was once part of the old Indiana Hi-Rail Corporation, which operated the line from May of 1988 until March of 1991.  Its traffic consists of agriculture, chemicals, aggregates, food products, and forest products.

Effingham Railroad (reporting mark, EFRR):  The little Effingham Railroad operates as a 400-foot, terminal switching road in the town of Effingham where the main lines of CSX and Canadian National also pass through.  Its primary traffic includes switching a 200,000 square-foot warehouse as well as a breakfast cereal company and cement company.  The road handles between 2,000 and 3,000 carloads annually.  It operates with two locomotives; SW1200 #2716 (built as Reading #2716) and GP10 #7510 (built as PRR GP9 #7063).  The latter is marked for the Illinois Western, an allying road.

Evansville Western Railway (reporting mark, EVWR):  This short line is a division of P&L Transportation and operates 124.5 miles of former Louisville & Nashville trackage between Evansville, Indiana and Okawville, Illinois (there are also spurs reaching White Oak and Sugar Camp).  The property was acquired from CSX in 2005 with service commencing on January 1, 2006.  The road handles roughly 60,000 carloads annually.

Illinois & Midland Railway (reporting mark, IMRR):  This road was formally known as the historic Chicago & Illinois Midland, a system with roots dating back to the Pawnee Railroad of 1888.  It gained its current name in 1905 when it was acquired by coal interests.  While the system had plans of reaching Chicago these hopes never materialized.  It owned two segments, from Peoria to Springfield while another ran between Compro and Taylorville.  The sections were connected via trackage rights over the Illinois Central.  In 1996 Genesee & Wyoming acquired the line and renamed it as the Illinois & Midland.  Today, the original C&IM is still operated by G&W save for the extension to Compro.  In all it owns 97 miles with traffic consisting of chemicals, coal, food/feed products, forest products, metallic ores/minerals, and municipal solid waste.

Illinois Railway (reporting mark, IR): Formerly known as Illinois RailNet and owned by OmniTRAX this short line has been in service since 1997 operating four disconnected lines in the western suburbs of Chicago that total 113 miles.  The carrier moves a wide variety of aggregates, sand, and mineral products with primary shippers including U.S. Silica, Fairmount Minerals, Techni Sand, James Hardie, Watco Reload, ADM, Behr Iron & Minerals, and Unimin Corporation.

Illinois Western Railroad (reporting mark, ILW):  This short line is owned by Charles W. Barenfanger Jr., who also owns the small Effingham Railroad.  This carrier is also a terminal/switching road located near the town of Greenville and serves a 700 acre industrial park that is ideally situated to the CSX main line next door.  The road also connects to BNSF nearby, roughly 3 1/2 miles away.  The company's sole locomotive is aforementioned GP10 #7510 (built as PRR GP9 #7063) that sometimes pulls double-duty on the Effingham.

Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad (reporting mark, IHB):  This historic terminal road traces its history back to 1907 when it was created through the mergers of several small systems in the Chicago area.  For many years it was jointly owned by the C&NW and NYC, until the former sold its interest to the Milwaukee Road.  Today, the switching line remains jointly owned by CSX, NS, and Canadian Pacific.  It operates a total of 320 miles of which roughly 30 is main line.  The IHB skirts the western side of Chicago with operations reaching into the northwest corner of Indiana.

Indiana Rail Road (reporting mark, INDR):  This now large, profitable, and successful Class II regional began humbly in 1986 when it acquired 155 miles of former ICG property between Indianapolis, Indiana and Newton, Illinois.  Over the time the system continued adding trackage and spinoffs from the larger Class Is, aggressively working to grow its customer base in the meantime.  Today, the road owns lines that trace their roots back to the Milwaukee Road, Chicago & Eastern Illinois, Louisville & Nashville, and Monon along with the aforementioned IC property.  It owns or has trackage rights on some 500 miles reaching Chicago, Louisville, and Newton, Illinois while handling more than 200,000 annual carloads.

Iowa Interstate Railroad (reporting mark, IAIS):  This now successful, Class II regional started out in 1982 as the Iowa Railroad when this little shortline purchased 375 miles of the Rock Island's former Chicago-Council Bluffs main line between the latter city and Bureau, Illinois.  Two years later in 1984 the nearly-abandoned property was purchased by the Heartland Rail Corporation, renaming it as the Iowa Interstate Railroad.  It was nearly abandoned again but prospered under new management in 1990.  What started out handling only a few thousand carloads annually has turned into a profitable company that now boasts more than 110,000 carloads of freight each year.  It currently operates from Chicago (via trackage rights over CSX) to Omaha with a branch to Peoria and even features new power in the form of ES44AC road-switchers.

Joppa & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, JE):  Originally incorporated on April 4, 1990 this is another privately owned short line of the Ameren Corporation.  It serves a power plant near Joppa, Illinois along the Ohio River running from that point, 4.5 miles to an interchange with BNSF.

Kankakee, Beaverville & Southern Railroad (reporting mark, KBSR):  This short line began service in 1977 over former New York Central trackage between
Sheldon and Kankakee, Illinois acquired from Conrail that year.  In time the system grew as more trackage was shed by various railroads.  Today, the KB&S operates roughly 155 miles connecting Kankakee, Danville, and Lafayette.  Its traffic consists of agriculture, chemicals, and plastics.

Keokuk Junction Railway (reporting mark, KJRY):  This short line has its beginnings in 1980 when it acquired roughly 4 miles of the Rock Island's former yard in Keokuk, Iowa to provide switching and terminal services.  Since then it has steadily grown into a 126 mile system between Peoria, Illinois and Keokuk, Iowa as well as between LaHarpe and Lomax, Illinois (this trackage is primarily ex-Toledo, Peoria & Western/Santa Fe).  The system also has trackage rights to Fort Madison, Iowa where interchanges with UP.   In 1996 it was acquired by Pioneer Railcorp and its traffic base includes corn, corn germ, corn syrup, meal, gluten feed, and railroad wheels.

Manufacturers Junction Railway (reporting mark, MJ):  This terminal road dates back to its incorporation on January 28, 1903 and it opened for service in 1906 serving the area of Cicero.  Today, it is a subsidiary of OmniTRAX and operates about 6 miles of trackage interchanging with CSX, Canadian National, Belt Railway of Chicago, UP (via BRC), and BNSF Railway.

Pioneer Industrial Railway (reporting mark, PRY): The Pioneer Industrial Railway is another Pioneer Rail Corporation property operating 8.5 miles of trackage betwen Peoria and Peoria Heights that was historically owned by the Peoria & Pekin Union.  The road began service on February 18, 1998 and its freight consists of lumber and steel.

Riverport Railroad (reporting mark, RVPR):  This small terminal/switching road serves the Savanna Army Ordinance Depot and operates a total of 72 miles of trackage inlcuding main lines, spurs, and sidings.  It interchanges with BNSF at Robinson Spur.

Shawnee Terminal Railway (reporting mark, STR): This railroad is yet another Pioneer Rail Corporation shortline operating just 2.5 miles of trackage near Cairo at 17th Street Yard for car cleaning and storage capabiliites.  It interchanges with Canadian National.

South Chicago & Indiana Harbor Railway (reporting mark, SCIH):  This system traces its history back to the Chicago Short Line Railway incorporated on December 8, 1900 and began service in 1903.  In April of 2002 the property was acquired by International Steel Group, which renamed it as the South Chicago & Indiana Harbor Railway (this company was subsequently acquired by Mittal Steel/ArcelorMittal in 2005).  Today, the SC&IH serves South Chicago and South Deering, Illinois along with Indiana Harbor, Indiana.  It operates 27 miles of track and continues to serve as a terminal railroad.

Tazewell & Peoria Railroad (reporting mark, TZPR):  This small short line, a G&W property serves a terminal system around Peoria operating 24 main line miles with 100 miles in total including yards, sidings, and spurs.  The T&P leases the property formerly known as the historic Peoria & Pekin Union Railway that dates back to 1881 (it is technically jointly owned by UP, NS, and CN).  It serves a wide variety of customers and handles about 100,000 carloads  annually while traffic consists of chemicals, coal, construction machinery, food/feed products, forest products, and steel/scrap.

Toledo, Peoria & Western Railway (reporting mark, TPW):  This historic system dates back to its formation in 1887 through the merger of the Peoria & Warsaw Railway and the Logansport, Peoria & Burlington.  In time the TP&W came to operate a system stretching from Logansport, Indiana to Fort Madison, Iowa with a branch reaching Keokuk, Iowa and Warsaw, Illinois.  In all its system stretched about 230 miles.  For many years the road was a subsidiary of the PRR but became independent once more following the bankruptcy of Penn Central.  In 1983 it was picked up by the Santa Fe, which sold much of the remaining property in September of 1999 to RailAmerica.  Today, it is owned by G&W runnining between Peoria and Logansport  Its traffic consists of chemicals, machinery, cement, feed meals and biodiesel, wind tower components, and other freight.

Vandalia Railroad (reporting mark, VRRC):  This small short line is a Pioneer RailCorp property (since October of 1994) operating just 3 miles north of Vandalia.  Its principal freight includes steel pipe, plastic pellets, and fertilizer.  It began service in 1983 when Illinois Central Gulf began abandoning sections of the original IC main line between Cairo and Galena built during the 1850s.

Vermilion Valley Railroad (reporting mark, VVRR): This small short line operates about 6 miles of track betwen Danville, Illinois and Olin, Indiana on trackage once owned by the NYC.  It was acquired from CSX by the Indiana Boxcar Corportion in 2003.

Wisconsin & Southern Railroad (reporting mark, WSOR):  This large, profitable Class II regional has been successful in resuscitating many secondary, left-for-dead branch lines in the state of Wisconsin and northern Illinois (Fox Lake although trackage rights give it access to Clearing Yard in Chicago) that once belonged to the Milwaukee Road and Chicago & North Western.  It began service in 1980 and today operates more than 700 miles of track, some of which is owned by the state of Wisconsin.  The company, currently owned by Watco since 2012, plans to continue resurrecting lines in the region it sees as a potential profitable ventures.  The Wisconsin & Southern handles more than 60,000 carloads annually with freight traffic highly diversified.

Aberdeen, Carolina & Western GP40-2LW #9582 and two other units work the Perdue elevator at Candor, North Carolina during early 2005. This wide-nosed Geep, and the others like it used on the AC&W, began life on the Canadian National.

Indiana Short Line Railroad Guide

Belt Four Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, BFT):  This small short line began service in January of 2014 operating 9 miles between Connersville and Beesons, Indiana, interchanging with CSX at the former location and NS at the latter.

Big Four Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, BFTR):  This small terminal road has been in service since January of 2003 operating 1.5 miles of track at Craigville, Indiana providing switching for local industries in that town.

Central Indiana & Western Railroad (reporting mark, CEIW): This independent terminal/switching carrier operates approximately 7 miles of track between Lapel and Anderson where it interchanges with CSX.  The road's traffic consists of glass products and agriculture.

Central Railroad of Indiana (reporting mark, CIND): This medium-sized carrier operates 96 miles of former NYC trackage between Cincinnati, Ohio and Shelbyville, Indiana.  It has been in service since 1992 and was acquired by RailAmerica in 2000 before G&W ownership in 2012.  Today, its traffic base includes automobiles, chemicals, metals, aggregates while moving more than 11,000 carloads annually.

Chicago, Fort Wayne & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, CFE):  This Genesee & Wyoming road (formerly RailAmerica) began service in 2004 over PRR's former Fort Wayne Line between Gary, Indiana and Crestline, Ohio with a branch reaching Decatur.  It operates roughly 315 miles in total with freight consisting of lumber, paper, chemicals, steel beams, shelled corn, and other hazardous materials.

Chicago, SouthShore & South Bend Railroad (reporting mark, CSS):  This historic system traces its roots back to an interurban.  On December 2, 1901 the Chicago & Indiana Air Line Railway was incorporated to connect East Chicago and Indiana Harbor, a distance of about three and a half miles. In 1904 the railroad reincorporated as the Chicago, Lake Shore & South Bend Railway to better reflect its intentions of connecting East Chicago with South Bend, a distance of about 67 miles.  By 1908 the original route between East Chicago and South Bend was opened and completely electrified operating on a 6,600-volt, alternating current (AC) system (700 volts within city limits).  In 1925 it was acquired by Sam Insull which formed the Chicago, South Shore & South Bend Railroad to acquire the assets of the earlier carrier.  While the CSS&SB became noted and derived significant revenue from passenger/commuter service it also built up a substantial freight business, which eventually superseded the former.  In 1989 the South Shore was able to completely drop passenger service, handed over to the Northern Indiana Commuter Transportation District.  Today, the road is owned by the Anacostia & Pacific Company, continuing to operate its original main line with traffic highly diversified.

Dubois County Railroad (reporting mark, DCRR):  This small short line is the freight-hauling arm of the Indiana Railway Museum.  The systems operates 16 miles from a connection with NS at Huntingburg to Dubois (the museums owns a total of 24 miles, stretching as far as French Lick.  The route's history dates back to the Southern and the company currently hauls agriculture and petroleum products.

Elkhart & Western Railroad (reporting mark, EWR):  This small short line was formed by the Pioneer Railcorp in 2001, acquiring 11 miles of former NS property between Elkhart and Mishawaka (the line's history traces back to the NYC).  Since first entering service the road has acquired an additional 23-mile, disconnected segment between Argos and Walkerton, Indiana.  The road's traffic base consists of auto frames, cement, lumber, tomato paste, plastics, and aggregates.

Evansville Western Railway (reporting mark, EVWR):  This short line is a division of P&L Transportation and operates 124.5 miles of former Louisville & Nashville trackage between Evansville, Indiana and Okawville, Illinois (there are also spurs reaching White Oak and Sugar Camp).  The property was acquired from CSX in 2005 with service commencing on January 1, 2006.  The road handles roughly 60,000 carloads annually.

Fulton County Railway (reporting mark, FC): The Fulton County Railway is an OminTRAX short line operating about a 25-mile system serving the Fulton County Industrial Park and connects with CSX.  The road began operations in 2004 and its track consists of food products, metals, paper, and packaging products.

Fulton County Railroad (reporting mark, FCR):  This small, privately-owned short line serves just one customer in Rochester, Indiana the Wilson Fertilizer & Grain, Inc.  The history of the line dates back to the former Erie Railroad's Chicago trunk line between the Windy City and New York.  Most of the route was primarily abandoned following Conrail's startup in 1976.  A short line known as Erie Western attempted to retain service from western Ohio to Chicago but went under in 1979.  A 1-mile segment was retained west of Rochester (once also operated by Indiana Hi-Rail) and is owned by the Fulton County Authority.

Grand Elk Railroad (reporting mark, GDLK): The Grand Elk Railroad is a Watco shortline and has been in operation only since 2009. A large shortline, it operates 151 miles from NS between Grand Rapids, Michigan and Elkhart, Indiana (formerly owned by the NYC).  Today, the line transports automotive parts, plastics, metals, forest products, agricultural products and aggregates.

Hoosier Southern Railroad (reporting mark, HOS): The Hoosier Southern Railroad serves the Perry County Port Authority operating about 22 miles of track between Cannelton and Lincoln City, Indiana.  The road has been in service since 1991 over trackage acquired by NS that year.  It utilizes a trio of GP7s for power.

Indiana & Ohio Railway (reporting mark, IORY):  This short line has been in service since 1985 when it acquired a former NYC branch between Valley Junction, Ohio and Brookville, Indiana.  In the succeeding years the I&O picked up several more routes being shed by Class Is with histories tracing back to the PRR, Baltimore & Ohio, and Chesapeake & Ohio that stretched as far as Dundee, Michigan.  For many years it was owned by RailAmerica whose assets were acquired by G&W in 2012.  Today, the I&O operates about 570 miles and hauls metal products, chemicals, plastics, lumber, paper, agricultural products, and distillers grains.

Indian Creek Railroad (reporting mark, ICRK): This small railroad is owned by Rydman & Fox, Inc. and operates about 4.5 miles of trackage.  It began service in 1981 running between Anderson, Indiana and its current connection with NS at Florida Station.  The road primarily handles agriculture products and owns a single RS11 of Southern Pacific heritage for power.

Indiana Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, IERR): This privately owned short line, a subsidiary of the Respondek Railroad, leases 43-miles from CSX between Richmond, Indiana and Fernald, Ohio that previously dated back to Chesapeake & Ohio ownership.  The road has been in service since 2005.

Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad (reporting mark, IHB):  This historic terminal road traces its history back to 1907 when it was created through the mergers of several small systems in the Chicago area.  For many years it was jointly owned by the C&NW and NYC, until the former sold its interest to the Milwaukee Road.  Today, the switching line remains jointly owned by CSX, NS, and Canadian Pacific.  It operates a total of 320 miles of which roughly 30 is main line.  The IHB skirts the western side of Chicago with operations reaching into the northwest corner of Indiana.

Indiana Rail Road (reporting mark, INDR):  This now large, profitable, and successful Class II regional began humbly in 1986 when it acquired 155 miles of former ICG property between Indianapolis, Indiana and Newton, Illinois.  Over the time the system continued adding trackage and spinoffs from the larger Class Is, aggressively working to grow its customer base in the meantime.  Today, the road owns lines that trace their roots back to the Milwaukee Road, Chicago & Eastern Illinois, Louisville & Nashville, and Monon along with the aforementioned IC property.  It owns or has trackage rights on some 500 miles reaching Chicago, Louisville, and Newton, Illinois while handling more than 200,000 annual carloads.

Indiana Northeastern Railroad (reporting mark, IN):  This short line traces its history back to the Pigeon River Railroad of 1992.  Today, the company has blossomed into a 120-mile system serving northeastern Indiana, southern Michigan, and northwestern Ohio much of which dates back to NYC heritage.  The road's traffic base consist of coal, agriculture, sand, glass, steel, and other freight.

Indiana Southern Railroad (reporting mark, ISRR):  This large system first began service in 1992 over former Pennsylvania property between Indianapolis and Evansville.  It was acquired by RailAmerica in 2000 and subsequently by G&W in 2012.  The road operates nearly 200 miles and transports primarily agriculture-based freight commodities moving more than 70,000 carloads annually.

Indiana Southwestern Railway (reporting mark, ISW): This railroad is another of Pioneer Rail Corporation's property operating just 3.8 miles from Evansville, northward.  It began service in 2000 as the Evansville Terminal Railway that originally operated 17 miles between Evansville and Cynthiana of former IC trackage.  However, in 2011 it was cutback to just 3.8 miles following the cessation of grain service.  Current traffic consists of agriculture, plastics, and rail equipment.

Kendallville Terminal Railway (reporting mark, KTR): Another Pioneer Rail Corporation shortline this terminal railroad operates just 1.1 mile of track near Kendallville hauling sugar and syrup.  The route's heritage dates back to the Grand Rapids & Indiana, later Michigan Central which was acquired by NYC.

Lake Michigan & Indiana Railroad (reporting mark, LMIC):  This non-operating short line, a division of the Keystone Railroad, is owned by ArcelorMittal (previously Bethlehem Steel Corporation) and has been in operation since 1999 when it began service on 66 miles of terminal and switching trackage in Burns Harbor, Indiana.  It is leased and operated by NS.

Louisville & Indiana Railroad (reporting mark, LIRC):  This short line, an Anacostia Rail Holdings property, has been in operation since 1994 that operates 106 miles of former PRR trackage between Indianapolis and Louisville, Kentucky.  The road's primary traffic consists of cement, chemicals, food products, grain lumber, manufactured goods, paper, plastics, scrap, and steel.  It moves more than 35,000 carloads annually.

Lucas Oil Rail Line (reporting mark, LORL):  Formerly known as the historic Louisville New Albany & Corydon Railroad which dated back to 1886 the property was acquired by Lucas Oil in 2006, which renamed it as the Lucas Oil Rail Line.  It operates nearly 8 miles of trackage between Corydon Junction and Corydon, Indiana hauling petroleum-based products.

Madison Railroad (reporting mark, CMPA):  This 25-mile short line is owned by the City of Madison Port Authority and has been in service since 1978 when it acquired the former PRR from Conrail between Madison and North Vernon.  Along with freight service the road offers car storage and switching services.

MG Rail, Inc. (reporting mark, MGRI):  This terminal/switching railroad is operated by Consolidated Grain & Barge operating 3.7 miles near the town of Jeffersonville.  It utilizes a pair of former CSX GP16s.

Napoleon, Defiance & Western Railroad (reporting mark, NDW):  This short line was famously known as the Maumee & Western for many years due to the badly deteriorated track upon which it operated.   It was originally part of the Wabash running between Fort Wayne, Indiana and Napoleon, Ohio (53 miles) and operated by NS until the 1980s when sold to Indiana Hi-Rail.  This company went bankrupt in the mid-1990s when it became the Maumee & Western.  In 2012 Pioneer Railcorp took over the property and renamed it as the ND&W.  Since then the company has performed extensive repairs to improve service.  The road handles food products, chemicals, aggregates, fertilizer, and grain.

Respondek Railroad (reporting mark, RRC):  This company first began service in 1987.  It is based in Boonville, Indiana where it provides contract rail car switching services and of short line rail operations.  Its three current systems include the Illini Terminal which offfers switching services in central Illinois; the Squaw Creek Southern Railroad (reporting mark, SQS) is a multifaceted operation, since 2007 it has operated the former Yankeetown Dock line between Yankeetown and Boonville, Indiana that primarily serves a coal-fired power plant at Alcoa while it also operates the former Central of Georgia line between Newborn and Manchen (12.5 miles) along with another 17-mile segment between Madison and Machen, both leased from NS; the Port Harbor Railroad (reporting mark, PHRR) provides switching/terminal operations at Granite City, Illinois operating about 5.2 miles of track serving the America's Central Port.  Most of Respondek's motive power wears a bright green and yellow livery paying homage to the historic Illinois Terminal, a one-time large interurban that became a successful freight hauler before disappearing into Norfolk & Western in 1980.

R.J. Corman Railroad, Western Ohio Lines (reporting mark, RJCW):  One of several roads affiliated with RJ Corman there are four different branches within this segment that first entered service in 1993 including the St. Mary's Line (Lima, Ohio - Portland, Indiana); the Greenville Line (Greenville, Ohio - Ansonia, Ohio); the SPEG Line (Lima - Glenmore, Ohio); and the Minster Branch between St. Mary's and Minster, Ohio.  The routes, totaling 94 miles, interchange with both CSX and NS handling grain, fertilizer, aluminum, rubber, tomato, plastic, and steel.

South Chicago & Indiana Harbor Railway (reporting mark, SCIH):  This system traces its history back to the Chicago Short Line Railway incorporated on December 8, 1900 and began service in 1903.  In April of 2002 the property was acquired by International Steel Group, which renamed it as the South Chicago & Indiana Harbor Railway (this company was subsequently acquired by Mittal Steel/ArcelorMittal in 2005).  Today, the SC&IH serves South Chicago and South Deering, Illinois along with Indiana Harbor, Indiana.  It operates 27 miles of track and continues to serve as a terminal railroad.

Toledo, Peoria & Western Railway (reporting mark, TPW):  This historic system dates back to its formation in 1887 through the merger of the Peoria & Warsaw Railway and the Logansport, Peoria & Burlington.  In time the TP&W came to operate a system stretching from Logansport, Indiana to Fort Madison, Iowa with a branch reaching Keokuk, Iowa and Warsaw, Illinois.  In all its system stretched about 230 miles.  For many years the road was a subsidiary of the PRR but became independent once more following the bankruptcy of Penn Central.  In 1983 it was picked up by the Santa Fe, which sold much of the remaining property in September of 1999 to RailAmerica.  Today, it is owned by G&W runnining between Peoria and Logansport  Its traffic consists of chemicals, machinery, cement, feed meals and biodiesel, wind tower components, and other freight.

U. S. Rail Corporation (reporting mark, USRC):  This company operates a handful of short lines in the eastern United States. It operates one terminal road near Kokomo, Indiana primarily handling grain traffic.

Vermilion Valley Railroad (reporting mark, VVRR): This small short line operates about 6 miles of track betwen Danville, Illinois and Olin, Indiana on trackage once owned by the NYC.  It was acquired from CSX by the Indiana Boxcar Corportion in 2003.

Wabash Central Railroad (reporting mark, WBCR):  This privately-owned short line has been in service since June 22, 1999 utilizing the former Nickel Plate's "Clover Leaf" between Craigville and Van Buren, Indiana.  Power for the operation is a pair of former Illinois Central GP10s and traffic is primarily agriculture.

Iowa Short Line Railroad Guide

Appanoose County Community Railroad (reporting mark, APNC):  This short line began service in 1983 and currently operates 35 miles between Centerville and Albia.  The road utilizes a pair of GP7s for power.

Burlington Junction Railway (reporting mark, BJRY):  This small terminal-like railroad operates four, very short disconnected lines in Iowa, Missouri, and Illinois.  It began operations in 1985 and its traffic currently consists of agriculture products, chemicals, and fertilizer handling about 3,000 carloads annually.  To railfans the railroad is well-known for operating a set of rare Alco C415 switchers (#701-702), few of which were ever built and even fewer that remain operational.

Cedar Rapids & Iowa City Railway (reporting mark, CIC):  This road has a long, interesting history.  It began as an interurban on August 13, 1904 when operations first began between its namesake cities, a distance of 27 miles.  The road also began a branch to Davenport that reached as far as Lisbon (17 miles) before rising costs halted construction.  This extension was abandoned in 1928.  What also became known as the "The CRANDIC Route" became a successful freight line and discontinued all passenger service in 1953.  Today, it operates 60 miles thanks to its acquisition of the former Milwaukee Road between Cedar Rapids and Homestead as well as the former Rock Island between Iowa City and Hills.  Today, the Crandic handles more than 90,000 carloads annually.

D&I Railroad (reporting mark, DAIR):  Also known as the Dakota & Iowa Railroad this system is owned by L.G. Everist, Inc.  The short line operates between Sioux City, Iowa and Dell Rapids, South Dakota with a branch to Beresford, South Dakota via Hawarden, Iowa.  The property was all former Milwaukee Road trackage acquired by both states in 1981 to preserve rail service.  The D&I operates a total of 138 miles and handles aggregate, distillers grain, ethanol, agriculture, cement, fertilizer, and other general freight.

Iowa Interstate Railroad (reporting mark, IAIS):  This now successful, Class II regional started out in 1982 as the Iowa Railroad when this little shortline purchased 375 miles of the Rock Island's former Chicago-Council Bluffs main line between the latter city and Bureau, Illinois.  Two years later in 1984 the nearly-abandoned property was purchased by the Heartland Rail Corporation, renaming it as the Iowa Interstate Railroad.  It was nearly abandoned again but prospered under new management in 1990.  What started out handling only a few thousand carloads annually has turned into a profitable company that now boasts more than 110,000 carloads of freight each year.  It currently operates from Chicago (via trackage rights over CSX) to Omaha with a branch to Peoria and even features new power in the form of ES44AC road-switchers.

Iowa Northern Railway (reporting mark, IANR):  The Iowa Northern has been in service since 1984 and operates the former Rock Island between Manly and Cedar Rapids, 163 miles.  Since then the road has acquired the former Chicago Great Western between Cedar Falls and Oelwein as well as a disconnected branch between Forest City and Belmond.  The privately owned company's traffic base includes agriculture, chemicals, bio-fuel commodities, food products, and truck parts.

Iowa River Railroad (reporting mark, IARR):  This short line began service in 2006 when it acquired a section of property from Union Pacific between Marshalltown and Ackley, Iowa via Steamboat Rock.  The road carries ethanol, grain, and chemicals/fertilizers.

Iowa Traction Railway (reporting mark, IATR): The last interurban in the country which still serves freight customers, the Iowa Traction dates back to the late 19th century known originally as the Mason City & Clear Lake Railway. Today the railroad continues to operate the original route between Emery and Clear Lake Junction, just 10.4 miles. It is now a Progressive Rail subsidiary and handles a variety of freight including scrap metal, fertilizers, wood products, ethanol and frozen food products.

Keokuk Junction Railway (reporting mark, KJRY):  This short line has its beginnings in 1980 when it acquired roughly 4 miles of the Rock Island's former yard in Keokuk, Iowa to provide switching and terminal services.  Since then it has steadily grown into a 126 mile system between Peoria, Illinois and Keokuk, Iowa as well as between LaHarpe and Lomax, Illinois (this trackage is primarily ex-Toledo, Peoria & Western/Santa Fe).  The system also has trackage rights to Fort Madison, Iowa where interchanges with UP.   In 1996 it was acquired by Pioneer Railcorp and its traffic base includes corn, corn germ, corn syrup, meal, gluten feed, and railroad wheels.

Kansas Short Line Railroad Guide

Blackwell Northern Gateway Railroad (reporting mark, BNG): This small shortline is owned by the Blackwell Industrial Authority Oklahoma Department of Transportation while the line is operated by US Rail Partners.  Its trackage consists of about 35 miles between Blackwell, Oklahoma and Hunnewell, Kansas.  It has been in service since 2002 when it took over operating rights from the South Kansas & Oklahoma.

Cimarron Valley Railroad (reporting mark, CVR):  This privately-owned short line, a subsidiary of The Western Group, has been in service since early 1996 when it acquired former Santa Fe trackage in Oklahoma, Colorado, and Kansas.  In all the road operates roughly 254 miles and its traffic base is largely agriculture but also includes other types of freight.  The road is known for using a fleet of early second-generation, rebuilt GP30s for power.

Garden City Western Railway (reporting mark, GCW): This railroad is owned by the Pioneer RailCorp and operates 40 miles of track between Garden City and Shallow Water with a branch to Wolf.  The history of the line dates back to 1916 when it was formed by the Garden City Sugar & Land Company.  It was acquired by Pioneer in 1999. Traffic consists of grain, frozen beef, fertilizer, farm implements, feed products, and utility poles.

Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad (reporting mark, KO):  This large regional operates roughly 840 miles track across much of central and western Kansas, reaching the Colorado border.  The K&O began service in 2001 and the property's history primarily traces back to the Santa Fe with a few Missouri Pacific segments.  The railroad is a Watco property and handles more than 50,000 carloads annually.

Kansas City Terminal Railway (reporting mark, KCT): This terminal railroad, which has been in operation since 1906 serves the city of Kansas City providing switching service for the larger railroads which operate through the area.

Kyle Railroad (reporting mark, KYLE):  This large, Class II, regional system operates more than 500 miles of which most is the Rock Island's former main line between Chicago and Denver.  It also owns some branch trackage north and west of Salina, Kansas with a very short segment reaching into southern Nebraska.  It was a long-time RailAmerica property before that company was purchased by G&W in 2012.  Its current traffic includes wheat, soybeans, milo maize, alcohols, siding asphalt, and roofing granules handling more than 21,000 carloads annually.

Missouri & Northern Arkansas Railroad (reporting mark, MNA):  This regional system began in 1992, acquiring more than 102 miles from Union Pacific late that year.  For many years it was under RailAmerica before this company was purchased by G&W in 2012.  Today, the M&NA operates nearly 600 miles of track, much of which is leased from UP and BNSF, extending from southeastern Missouri to northern Arkansas.  Its annual carloads exceed 100,000 and range from unit coal trains to general merchandise.

Nebraska, Kansas & Colorado Railway (reporting mark, NKCR):  This Class II, regional is another OmniTRAX property and operates roughly 559 miles of disconnected track predominantly based in Kansas but also reaches Sterling, Colorado.  It has been in service since 1996 with traffic largely made up of coal movements while it also handles wheat, corn, and fertilizer.

V&S Railway (reporting mark, VSR):  This short line, owned by A&K Railroad Materials, operates two disconnected lines in Kansas; between Medicine Lodge and Attica as well as the former Hutchinson & Northern, a former terminal road serving the region around Hutchinson.  The road's traffic consists of scrap metal, salt, and repaired cars, frac sand, wall board, and plaster.

South Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad (reporting mark, SKOL): The SK&O is another Watco regional railroad Tulsa, Oklahoma to several points throughout southeastern Kansas including Winfield, Humboldt, and Pittsburg among others.  The collection of lines trace their roots back to the Missouri Pacific, St. Louis-San Francisco, and Santa Fe.  Its property totals 404 miles and annual carloads exceed 50,000 moving such products as agriculture, cement, coal, chemicals, steel, and plastics.

Wichita Union Terminal Railway (reporting mark, WTA):  This road is jointly owned by UP and BNSF.  It was first established in 1910 although the tracks serving stockyard and packing companies at Wichita had been in service since 1889.  From the beginning it was jointly owned by Santa Fe, Rock Island, MoPac, and Frisco handling local switching and terminal service, which continues through today.

Kentucky Short Line Railroad Guide

Indiana Rail Road (reporting mark, INDR):  This now large, profitable, and successful Class II regional began humbly in 1986 when it acquired 155 miles of former ICG property between Indianapolis, Indiana and Newton, Illinois.  Over the time the system continued adding trackage and spinoffs from the larger Class Is, aggressively working to grow its customer base in the meantime.  Today, the road owns lines that trace their roots back to the Milwaukee Road, Chicago & Eastern Illinois, Louisville & Nashville, and Monon along with the aforementioned IC property.  It owns or has trackage rights on some 500 miles reaching Chicago, Louisville, and Newton, Illinois while handling more than 200,000 annual carloads.

Kentucky West Tennessee Railway (reporting mark, KWT): The KWT operates a 69-mile system of unconnected lines, mostly in northwestern Tennessee, which also reaches Murray, Kentucky.  The road has been a G&W property since 2005 and hauls brick, clay, and food/feed products.

Louisville & Indiana Railroad (reporting mark, LIRC):  This short line, an Anacostia Rail Holdings property, has been in operation since 1994 that operates 106 miles of former PRR trackage between Indianapolis and Louisville, Kentucky.  The road's primary traffic consists of cement, chemicals, food products, grain lumber, manufactured goods, paper, plastics, scrap, and steel.  It moves more than 35,000 carloads annually.

Paducah & Louisville Railway (reporting mark, PAL): The P&L is owned by Four Rivers Transportation, Inc., a CSX subsidiary. The railroad stretches throughout western Kentucky along a system covering 265 miles between primarily Louisville and Paducah.  The property was acquired from Illinois Central Gulf in 1986.  Today, this Class II, regional moves a wide variety of freight from coal and lumber to agriculture and chemicals that total roughly 200,000 carloads annually.

RJ Corman, Bardstown Line (reporting mark, RJCR):  Another division of RJ Corman this line runs roughly 20 miles from a connection with CSX west of Clermont and running east of Bardstown.  The corridor has been under RJ ownership since January of 1987 moving plate steel, plastics, lumber, building supplies, distillers' grain, and brick.  It is also home to the My Old Kentucky Dinner Train excursion.

RJ Corman, Central Kentucky Lines (reporting mark, RJCC):  Another division of RJ Corman this collection of lines that comprise two different sections; one runs between Versailles and Lexington (formerly a short line known as the Lexington & Ohio until 2003) a distance of 15 miles while the other serves Louisville and Winchester via Frankfort and Lexington, more than 100 miles in length.  Both routes total roughly 115 miles moving peanuts, aluminum ingots, alcohol, paper, plastic, fertilizer, limestone, sand, scrap paper, brick, corn syrup, and oil.

Transkentucky Transportation Railroad (reporting mark, TTIS):  This short line was formed in 1979 by acquiring the L&N's' former branch between Paris and Maysville.  While the road moves largely coal it also handles other types of freight.

West Tennessee Railroad (reporting mark, WTNN):  This short line has been in service since 1984 utilizing the former Gulf, Mobile & Ohio main line between Jackson and Kenton, Tennessee.  In 2001 it expanded operations by leasing from NS the former GM&O to Corinth, Mississippi as well as the ex-Illinois Central to Fulton, Kentucky.  Today, the road handles a variety of freight including agriculture, petroleum products, packaging material, paper, lumber, propane, and other products.

Western Kentucky Railway (reporting mark, WKRL): This railroad has been in service since 1995 and serves coal mines near Dekoven with an interchange of the Paducah & Louisville at Blackford.  The property's history traces back to the Illinois Central.

Louisiana Short Line Railroad Guide

Acadiana Railway Company (reporting mark, AKDN):  This privately-owned short line began service in late 1990 operating two disconnected lines; it runs nearly 22 miles between Crowley and Eunice with trackage rights on the UP to Opelousas (21 miles).  It then operates over its own rails again between there and Bunkie.  The road also leases 5 miles of trackage between McCall and Lula to serve local industries.  Its freight consists of agriculture, general freight, and food-based oils.

Arkansas, Louisiana & Mississippi Railroad (reporting mark, ALM):  The AL&M is another G&W property, operating about 53 miles of track between Crossett, Arkansas and Monroe, Louisiana.  The route's history dates back to 1906 and was for years owned by lumber interests, lastly by Georgia-Pacific.  In 2004 G&W purchased the AL&M and the railroad currently moves forest-based products as well as chemicals.

Baton Rouge Southern Railroad (reporting mark, BRS): The Baton Rouge Southern Railroad is a Watco Companies property operating a very small segment of track north of the city, about 1.5 miles.  It began service in 2008 and hauls bauxite, plastic pellets, raw coke, and calcinated coke.

CG Railway (reporting mark, CGR): The CG Railway, owned by the International Shipholding Corporation, offers terminal/ferry service between New Orleans and central Mexico at the Port of Coatzacoalcos in Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz.  It has been in service since 2000.

Delta Southern Railroad (reporting mark, DSRR):  This independently-owned short line has been in service since 1991, operating two disconnected branches in Louisiana and Arkansas.  Its traffic is highly diversified including grain/agricultural products, cotton, coal, chemicals, forest products, sand, clay, soda ash, and aggregates.

Louisiana & Delta Railroad (reporting mark, LDRR):  This G&W property has been in service since 1987 when it acquired the former Southern Pacific.  Today, it operates from New Orleans to Iowa, Louisiana with several short branches radiating from the main line.  In total the railroad operates about 72 miles hauling aggregates, brick/cement, chemicals, food/feed products, forest products, scrap.

Louisiana & North West Railroad (reporting mark, LNW):  This historic line dates back to its founding in 1888.  The L&NW eventually grew to 124 miles between McNeil, Arkansas and Natchitoches, Louisiana but this was later cutback to Gibsland.  These 68 miles are still operated under Patriot Rail today, which acquired the property in 2008.

Louisiana Southern Railroad (reporting mark, LAS): This railroad is another Watco Companies short line (since 2005) leasing 157 miles of disconnected Kansas City Southern trackage in northern Louisiana between Pineville and Gibsland as well as another segment between Shreveport and Springhill via Sibley. 

New Orleans Public Belt Railroad (reporting mark, NOPB):  This historic, terminal switching road has been in service since 1908.  It currently interchanges with six of the seven North American Class Is operating roughly 100 miles of track in total (including yards, sidings, spurs, etc.).

New Orleans & Gulf Coast Railway (reporting mark, NOGC): The NO&GC is a Rio Grande Pacific Corporation railroad operating around the New Orleans area.  It runs between Myrtle Grove and Gretna as well as another section between Algiers and Westwego.  In all this trackage totals about 32 miles.  It also has a 4.5 branch serving Harvey.  The road handles petroleum products, oils, chemicals, food products, grains, and steel products.

Ouachita Railroad (reporting mark, OUCH):  This short line operates 26 miles between El Dorado, Arkansas and Lille, Louisiana.  It was originally a Rock Island branch, later operated by the South Central Arkansas Railroad from 1982 until the East Camden & Highland Railroad purchased the line in 1983.  In 1990 it was sold to the Arkansas Short Line Railroads, which operates it as the Ouachita Railroad.  Its primary traffic includes lumber, chemicals, and particleboard.

Timber Rock Railroad (reporting mark, TIBR): The Timber Rock Railroad is another Watco property operating 160 miles of track mostly in east Texas but also reaches Deridder, Louisiana.  It has been in service since 1998 and acquired additional trackage a few years later.  It handles roughly 26,000 carloads annually that is largely forest products.

Maine Short Line Railroad Guide

Eastern Maine Railway (reporting mark, EMRY): The Eastern Maine Railway is owned by the New Brunswick Southern Railway and together serve a nearly 200-mile railroad between Saint John, New Brunswick and Brownville Junction, Maine in conjunction with allying road, the New Brunswick Southern Railway (reporting mark, NBSR).  The property is primarily former Maine Central and Canadian Pacific trackage.

Maine Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, MERR): This railroad operates both freight service and excursion trains along their coastal system that serves Brunswick and Rockland as well as between Brunswick and Augusta (about 88 miles in all).  The road is a subsidiary of Morristown & Erie Railway and has been in service since 2003 utilizing former MEC trackage.  It moves freight including cement, plate steel, and perlite.

New Hampshire Northcoast Corporation (reporting mark, NHN): This privately-owned short line has been in operation since 1986, operating the Boston & Maine's former Conway Branch between Ossipee and Rollinsford, New Hampshire right on the Maine border.  Its traffic consists primarily of aggregates.

Pan Am Railways (reporting mark, PAR):  The Pan Am is the renamed Guilford Transportation system.  These large regional has served much of New England since 1981 when it began acquiring such classic system as Maine Central, Boston & Maine, Portland Terminal, and Springfield Terminal.  In 2006 it changed its name to Pan Am Railways.  Today, it operates roughly 1,700 miles with primary traffic including grain, coal, sand/aggregates, food products, lumber, paper/pulpwood, chemicals and plastics, petroleum, processed minerals, metals, scrap metal, automobiles, and intermodal.

St. Lawrence & Atlantic Railroad (reporting mark, SLR):  This short line is another G&W property, operating a large corridor 157 miles in length between Portland and Norton, Vermont at the Canadian border.  The road handles a wide range of freight including aggregates, brick/cement, chemicals, food/feed products, forest products, intermodal, steel, and scrap.

Turners Island, LLC (reporting mark, TI): This small terminal railroad serves the 14 acre marine-rail cargo terminal located in South Portland, Maine.

Maryland Short Line Railroad Guide

Bay Coast Railroad (reporting mark, BCR): This coastal railroad operates a 70-mile system connecting Pocomoke City, Maryland with Norfolk, Virginia.  The route's history traces back to the PRR's former Delmarva Lines.  It also handles a 26-mile carfloat service between Cape Charles and Little Creek, Virginia.

Canton Railroad (reporting mark, CTN):  This historic terminal road was first chartered in 1906 and provides switching services for industries in East Baltimore as well as the Port of Baltimore.  It is owned by the Maryland Transportation Authority.

Georges Creek Railway (reporting mark, GCK):  This short line has been in service since late 2007 operating former Western Maryland Railway trackage in the western part of the state.

Maryland & Delaware Railroad (reporting mark, MDDE):  The Maryland & Delaware has been in service since 1977 when it acquired former PRR branches in Maryland and Delaware (more of the Delmarva Lines) soon after Conrail was formed.  The road currently operates 120 miles of track on four different branches (the Seafood Line, Centreville Line, Chestertown Line, and Snow Hill Line) moving such freight as agriculture, food products, steel, petroleum products, fertilizer, and forest products.

Maryland Midland Railway (reporting mark, MMID): This railroad is part of Genesee & Wyoming's large family of short lines and operates a 70 mile system running roughly east-west between Reisterstown and Fort Ritchie.  It also owns a north-south corridor between Woodsboro and Taneytown.  It began service in 1980 as an independent and was acquired by G&W in 2007.  The road handles aggregates, brick/cement, chemicals, and forest products.

Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway (reporting mark, WE): The Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway is a privately owned Class II, regional which has been in operation since 1990 carrying the name of the original W&LE. It operates an extensive system stretching across northern Ohio, West Virginia, and western Pennsylvania with trackage rights reaching Cumberland and Hagerstown.  It operates about 575 miles of its own lines as well as an additional 265 via trackage rights.  The road carries more than 130,000 carloads annually with a highly diversified freight base.

Winchester & Western Railroad (reporting mark, WW): The W&W's primary line runs from Gore, Virginia to Hagerstown, Maryland although the company also has New Jersey operations.   The company was chartered in 1916 to haul forest products and connect with the B&O at Winchester.  At its peak it ran from that point to Wardensville, West Virginia but by the 1940s operated no further than Gore, its current western end-of-track.  In 1986 it acquired the former PRR between Winchester and Williamsport, Maryland allowing it to reach Hagerstown (54 miles in all).  Soon after it picked up former Central Railroad of New Jersey property in southern New Jersey.  These two segments currently make up the W&W as its "Virginia Division" and "New Jersey Division." 

Massachusetts Short Line Railroad Guide

Pan Am Railways (reporting mark, PAR):  The Pan Am is the renamed Guilford Transportation system.  These large regional has served much of New England since 1981 when it began acquiring such classic system as Maine Central, Boston & Maine, Portland Terminal, and Springfield Terminal.  In 2006 it changed its name to Pan Am Railways.  Today, it operates roughly 1,700 miles with primary traffic including grain, coal, sand/aggregates, food products, lumber, paper/pulpwood, chemicals and plastics, petroleum, processed minerals, metals, scrap metal, automobiles, and intermodal.

Providence & Worcester Railroad (reporting mark, PW):  The P&W is another historic system spun-off following the Penn Central collapse.  It began in 1847, opening its original line between Worcester and Millville, Massachusetts in September that year; a month later it was completed to Providence on October 20th. After nearly 50 years of independence the much large New Haven system leased the railroad for 99 years on July 1, 1892.  After the PC bankruptcy the road regained its independence in early 1973.  Today, it serves more than 140 customers and moves nearly 35,000 carloads annually as a Class II, regional.

Bay Colony Railroad (reporting mark, BCLR): This small short line serves the area southwest of Boston on former New Haven trackage.  It began service in 1982.

East Brookfield & Spencer Railroad (reporting mark, EBSR):  This independently-owned short line serves about 4 miles of the trackage in the East Brookfield area providing switching/terminal service where it connects with CSX.

Fore River Transportation Corporation/Fore River Railroad (reporting mark, FRVT): Owned by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) and operated under contract by the Fore River Transportation Corporation, the Fore River Railroad has been operation since 1902 providing switching and terminal service for the Fore River Shipyard at Quincy.

Grafton & Upton Railroad (reporting mark, GU):  The historic Grafton & Upton began in 1873, then chartered as the Grafton Center Railroad.  Originally a narrow-gauge operation the G&U was born in 1887 and by 1889 and connected Grafton with Milford (16.5 miles).   During the early 20th century it even operated, electrified streetcar service but this was abolished by 1946.  As the years passed the road languished as traffic disappeared sections of the property sat dormant but not abandoned.  In March of 2008 the railroad was acquired by Jon Delli Priscoli with the express intent of reviving the system.  Since then the company has set its sights on growing freight business while working to reopen the entire line after years of neglect and disuse.

Housatonic Railroad (reporting mark, HRRC):  The historic Housatonic Railroad has been around since its chartering in 1840.  It eventually grew into a rather substantial system serving western Connecticut, and southwestern Massachusetts.  It was long part of New Haven's Berkshire Division since first leased in 1892 but "regained" its independence more than 90 years later when Conrail sold sections of the original to a new Housatonic Railroad in 1983.  Today, the short line operates much of the original route between New Haven and Pittsfield with a western extension to Newburgh, New York.  It remains independently owned moving a wide variety of freight.  Additionally, there has been of initiating commuter rail service and the Berkshire Scenic Railway Museum hosts excursions on a section of the property.

Massachusetts Central Railroad (reporting mark, MCER):  This road first began service in the 1970s over former Boston & Maine and Boston & Albany (New York Central) property, which would have otherwise been abandoned.  The trackage is owned by the state and leased to the railroad.

Massachusetts Coastal Railroad (reporting mark, MC): Also known as the Mass Coastal Railroad this short line operates much of the former New Haven Railroad trackage in the state's eastern peninsula.  The road took over the duties of the Bay Colony Railroad on the line in 2007 providing service to the state's Cape Cod region.

New England Central Railroad (reporting mark, NECR): The New England Central has been in service since 1995 when it acquired the assets of the historic Central Vermont Railway, sold by Canadian National that year to RailTex Corporation which subsequently renamed the property.  This company was acquired by RailAmerica in 2000 which was purchased by G&W in 2012.  Today, the Class II, regional operates 394 miles and handles nearly 40,000 carloads annually. Its freight is highly diversified including lumber, panels & plywood, poles, newsprint, printing paper, compressed gas, chemicals, fuel oils, road salt, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, fabricated metals, resins, TOFC/COFC, finished vehicles, feed mill ingredients, machinery and equipment, recyclables, ash, construction debris, foodstuffs and non-metallic minerals.

Pioneer Valley Railroad (reporting mark, PVRR): The Pioneer Valley Railroad is owned by the Pinsly Railroad Company operating a short stretch of trackage in southwestern Massachusetts.  It has been in service since 1982 operating between Holyoke, Westfield, and Southampton while interchanging with CSX and Pan Am.

Ann Arbor GP35 #394 and two other siblings pull their train southbound out of Elberta, Michigan along the main line in September, 1979. Note that all three Geeps appear to be using AAR Type B trucks (typically found on Alco and early GE models) and not standard Bloombergs. The units were trade-ins to EMD from a small fleet of Alco FAs once used by the AA.

Michigan Short Line Railroad Guide

Adrian & Blissfield Rail Road (reporting mark, ADBF)/Charlotte Southern Railroad (reporting mark, CHS)/Detroit Connecting Railroad (reporting mark, DCON): The A&B, Charlotte Southern, and Detroit Connecting are all under common ownership operating five disconnected lines in Michigan; 20 miles between Riga and Adrian; a 3.5-mile spur east of Charlotte to serve a farm Co-Op (Charlotte Southern); a 2.5-mile spur providing switching/terminal service in Detroit’s Eastern Market and Milwaukee Junction districts (Detroit Connecting); a 47-mile line between Jackson and Lansing; and finally a 1.5-mile segment in Lapeer to serve local customers. To the general public the railroad is also well known for its popular Old Road Dinner Train.  The railroad has been in service since 1991.

Ann Arbor Railroad (reporting mark, AA):  The history of Ann Arbor traces back to 1895 when it was born through the reorganization of predecessor systems operating between Toledo, Ohio and Frankfort, Michigan.  The road long struggled to remain profitable.  In 1974 it entered bankruptcy and the property was soon purchased by the state to preserve rail service.  The present-day Ann Arbor, a corporate entity since 1988, has been a part of Watco since 2013.  It operates the original "Annie" between Toledo and Ann Arbor, about 50 miles and traffic consists of flour, sugar, grain, plastics, sand, cement, recyclables, paper, lumber, and petroleum.

Central Michigan Railway (reporting mark, CMGN):  This short line operates former New York Central and Grand Trunk Western between Durand and Bay City with segments reaching Owosso and Midland.  Its traffic consists of agriculture, forest products, chemicals, bulk transfer, and other freight.

Delray Connecting Railroad (reporting mark, DC):  This historic short line has been in service since 1904 serving Michigan's Zug Island.  The road, a division of Transtar/U.S. Steel operates about 15 miles of track and handles more than 35,000 carloads annually.  Its primary customer is the Great Lakes Works steel mill.

Escanaba & Lake Superior Railroad (reporting mark, ELS):  The historic, privately-owned E&LS was born in November of 1898 serving timber interests in the Upper Peninsula.  In time, ore also became an important source of freight and it grew into a 65-mile system.  Today, the road operates more than 300 miles of property, including trackage rights, as it has acquired former sections of the Soo Line and Milwaukee Road.  Its freight is highly diversified.

Grand Elk Railroad (reporting mark, GDLK): The Grand Elk Railroad is a Watco shortline and has been in operation only since 2009. A large shortline, it operates 151 miles from NS between Grand Rapids, Michigan and Elkhart, Indiana (formerly owned by the NYC).  Today, the line transports automotive parts, plastics, metals, forest products, agricultural products and aggregates.

Grand Rapids Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, GR): The Grand Rapids Eastern Railroad is a G&W short line operating 20 miles between Grand Rapids and Lowell.  The road began service in 1993 and was acquired by RA in 2000.  Today, it handles primarily wheat, sodium carbonate, and lumber.

Great Lakes Central Railroad (reporting mark, GLC):  This short line has been in service since 2006, taking over the property formerly owned by the Tuscola & Saginaw Bay Railway.  The trackage is the northern section of the original Ann Arbor between Ann Arbor and Yuma.  The rest of the system comprises sections of the former New York Central and Chesapeake & Ohio/Pere Marquette.  The entire Great Lakes Central totals roughly 400 miles.

Huron & Eastern Railway (reporting mark, HESR):  This system began service in 1986 over former C&O/PM trackage near Bay City.  Since then it has also acquired former NYC/Michigan Central lines and totals today 384 miles of sprawling trackage south and east of Bay City and Saginaw.  The road is currently owned by Genesee & Wyoming handling more than 34,000 carloads annually that includes beet pulp, beans, hazardous materials, shelled corn, fly ash, hydraulic cement, pulp-board, and soybeans.

Indiana & Ohio Railway (reporting mark, IORY):  This short line has been in service since 1985 when it acquired a former NYC branch between Valley Junction, Ohio and Brookville, Indiana.  In the succeeding years the I&O picked up several more routes being shed by Class Is with histories tracing back to the PRR, Baltimore & Ohio, and Chesapeake & Ohio that stretched as far as Dundee, Michigan.  For many years it was owned by RailAmerica whose assets were acquired by G&W in 2012.  Today, the I&O operates about 570 miles and hauls metal products, chemicals, plastics, lumber, paper, agricultural products, and distillers grains.

Indiana Northeastern Railroad (reporting mark, IN):  This short line traces its history back to the Pigeon River Railroad of 1992.  Today, the company has blossomed into a 120-mile system serving northeastern Indiana, southern Michigan, and northwestern Ohio much of which dates back to NYC heritage.  The road's traffic base consist of coal, agriculture, sand, glass, steel, and other freight.

Lake States Railway (reporting mark, LSRC):  The Lake States began service in 1992 operating the former Detroit & Mackinac and Michigan Central/NYC lines in northern Michigan.  Its trackage runs from Mt. Morris to Alpena as well as between Pinconning and Gaylord; there is also a short branch to Midland via Saginaw.  In all the railroad operates about 300 miles of trackage.  Its traffic is highly diversified including aggregates, agricultural products, building materials, cement, chemicals, cement, fertilizer, machinery, metals, petroleum products, plastics, and transportation equipment.

Lake Superior & Ishpeming Railroad (reporting mark, LSI): This historic short line traces its roots back to 1892 hauling iron ore in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.  By the 1920s it had expanded into a 200+ mile system of total trackage serving Big Bay, Ishpeming, and Munising.  Today, it utilizes just 16 miles running from the
Empire-Tilden Mine to Ishpeming.  Ore still remains its primary freight traffic.

Lapeer Industrial Railroad (reporting mark, LIRR): This very small industrial railroad operates just 1.5 miles of track performing switching duties near the town of Lapeer for local industries.  It is owned by the same company which operates the Adrian & Blissfield.

Marquette Rail (reporting mark, MQT):  This system is a G&W property, operating 126 miles of former PM/C&O trackage between Grand Rapids and Ludington/Manistee.  It has been in service since 2005 with freight consisting of chemicals, paperboard, grain, salt, and petroleum products among other traffic.

Michigan Shore Railroad (reporting mark, MS):   This road has been in operation since 1990 utilizing 52 miles of former PM/C&O trackage between Fremont and Pigeon Lake via Grand Haven.  It was originally independent but was acquired by RA in 2000, whose assets were purchased by G&W in 2012.  The short line currently hauls primarily sand and chemicals.

Michigan Southern Railroad (reporting mark, MSO):  This short line is owned by Pioneer Railcorp operating about 17 miles of track between White Pigeon and Sturgis.  The road began service in 1989 and utilizes former LS&MS/NYC trackage.  Its current traffic base includes scrap, scrap paper, pulpboard, frac sand, coal, lumber, and soybean oils.

Mid-Michigan Railroad (reporting mark, MMRR):  This G&W property first entered service in 1987 as a RailTex subsidiary, which was acquired by RA in 2000 until it too was purchased in 2012.  The short line currently operates about 32 miles between Alma and Saginaw handling primarily agricultural products.

Minnesota Short Line Railroad Guide

Cloquet Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, CTRR):  This short line has been in service since 2002, formerly known as the Duluth & Northeastern Railroad, and provides switching services for the large Sappi paper mill and a few other customers in Cloquet.  The road operates about 6 miles of track and interchanges with BNSF and Canadian Pacific.

Minnesota Commercial Railway (reporting mark, MNRR):  The Minnesota Commercial has been in operation since 1987 over what was formerly the Minnesota Transfer, a system dating back to 1883.  Today, the system operates nearly 150 miles of railroad in the Twin Cities with traffic including lumber, steel, paper, potash, consumer goods, and agricultural products.

Minnesota, Dakota & Western Railway (reporting mark, MDW):  This short line dates back to 1910 and currently operates about 4 miles of trackage serving paper mills in International Falls, Minnesota and Fort Frances, Ontario.  It handles more than 10,000 carloads annually.

Minnesota Northern Railroad (reporting mark, MNN): This large short line operates more than 200 miles of track in the western areas of the state connecting with Class Is BNSF and CP.   The history of its trackage traces back to the Great Northern and Northern Pacific, spun-off by then-Burlington Northern & Santa Fe in 1996.  Today, its freight is largely comprised of agricultural products.

Northern Plains Railroad (reporting mark, NPR): This privately-owned, short line railroad is mostly concentrated in North Dakota, leasing nearly 400 miles of track from carriers such as Canadian Pacific and Mohall Central Railroad.  The history of its properties traces back to the Soo, GN, and NP.  Its traffic consists primarily of agricultural products and it handles about 17,000 carloads annually.

Minnesota Prairie Line (reporting mark, MPLI): The MPL is a subsidiary of the Twin Cities & Western operating nearly 100 miles of track between Granite Falls and Hamburg.  The line is owned by the Minnesota Valley Regional Railroad Authority and its history traces back to the Minneapolis & St. Louis, later acquired by the C&NW.

Minnesota Southern Railway (reporting mark, MSWY): This shortline operates a stretch of trackage in southern Minnesota between Manley and Agate; the former connects with BNSF while the latter Union Pacific.  In all, there are about 41 miles in use.  The property was shed by C&NW in 1988, acquired by the Buffalo Ridge Regional Railroad Authority, and operated by Nobles Rock Railroad until 2000 when the Minnesota Southern took over service.

Northern Lines Railway (reporting mark, NLR): This rather small shortline is owned by Anacostia & Pacific operating about 25 miles of track between St. Cloud and Cold Spring with a branch to St. Joseph.  The road began service in 2004 over former BNSF trackage and currently handles about 10,000 carloads annually including aggregates, building products, chemicals, coal, food products, lumber, manufactured goods, paper, scrap, and steel.

Otter Tail Valley Railroad (reporting mark, OTVR): This short line is part of G&W's large family of railroads operating about 81 miles of track between Fargo and Fergus Falls, with a westerly extension running from the latter town.  The history of the property dates back to the Great Northern, acquired from then-BN in 1986.  Its traffic consists of ethanol, corn, soybeans, and inbound coal.

Progressive Rail, Inc. (reporting mark, PGR): Progressive Rail operates trackage in three different states and takes its paint scheme from the historic Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern Railway, also known as The Dan Patch Line (whose former trackage it also operates).   The road began service in 1996 over trackage in the Twin Cities and region and currently handles freight ranging from agriculture to chemicals.

Red River Valley & Western Railroad (reporting mark, RRVW):  Under common ownership with the Twin Cities & Western, the RRV&W is a 600+ mile regional operating former Burlington Northern trackage mostly located in North Dakota northwest of Wahpeton with lines stretching into extreme western Minnesota.  The road began service in 1987 and its traffic base is very diversified.

St. Croix Valley Railroad (reporting mark, SCXY): This privately-owned railroad operates about 36 miles of track between Hinkley and North Branch.  The system began service in 1996 and was once owned by RailAmerica.  It currently operates trackage once owned by the Northern Pacific as part of its larger, "Skally Line."  Its traffic currently consists of chemicals, grain, flour, sand, and fertilizers moving about 4,000 carloads annually.

Twin Cities & Western Railroad (reporting mark, TCWR):  This independently-owned short line began service in 1991 acquiring the Soo Line's former Milwaukee Road main line west of the Twin Cities.  Today, the carrier operates about 360 miles in all reaching Granite Falls, Minnesota and Sisseton, South Dakota via the Twin Cities.  Its current traffic base is highly diversified ranging from agriculture to transload services.

Mississippi Short Line Railroad Guide

Alabama & Gulf Coast Railway (reporting mark, AGR):  The is a G&W property operating nearly 350 miles of track running from eastern Mississippi, through western Alabama, and finally terminating at Pensacola, Florida.  The route's heritage traces back to the eastern extent of the St. Louis-San Francisco's network and today the railroad handles more than 61,000 carloads annually including coal, iron and steel, chemicals, scrap iron, pulp and paper, and limestone.

Alabama Southern Railroad (reporting mark, ABS):  This Watco property began service on November 20, 2005 and operates about 85 miles of track between Columbus, Mississippi and Birmingham, Alabama under lease with Kansas City Southern.  The property was formerly Gulf, Mobile & Ohio trackage.

Columbus & Greenville Railway (reporting mark, CAGY): The historic CAGY is owned by Genesee & Wyoming's large family of short lines connecting Greenville and Greenwood, Mississippi as well as Columbus and West Point on two unconnected sections of track.   The road was originally formed in the early 1920s, connecting its namesake cities and was once known for its fleet of Baldwin road-switchers.  Today, it operates 162 miles of track with traffic consisting of brick, food products, metal, and scrap.

Golden Triangle Railroad (reporting mark, GTRA): This railroad operates just 10 miles of track near the city of Columbus (via trackage rights) and Trinity to the south.  It is owned by the Patriot Rail Corporation, primarily serving the Weyerhaeuser fiber mill in Columbus while moving pulpwood, corn starch and chemicals.

Kosciusko & Southwestern Railway (reporting mark, KSRY): This short line, owned by the Mississippi Rail Group, Inc. operates about 22 miles of railroad originally owned by the Illinois Central between Aberdeen Junction and Munsons Crossing.  The road is currently inactive outside of car storage.

Luxapalila Valley Railroad (reporting mark, LXVR):  This short line operates about 38 miles of track from Columbus, Mississippi to Belk, Alabama handling forest and waste products.  It is another G&W line with interchange connections including NS, KCS, and Columbus & Greenville.

Meridian & Bigbee Railroad (reporting mark, MNBR):  The historic Meridian & Bigbee has been in service since the 1930s and still operates its original route from Montgomery, Alabama to Meridian, Mississippi.  It is currently owned by G&W and handles a wide range of freight.

Meridian Southern Railway (reporting mark, MDS): This privately owned short line operates about 55 miles of track between Meridian and Waynesboro where it connects at the former city with Kansas City Southern.  The road's freight includes lumber, food products, roofing products, and other traffic.

Mississippi Central Railroad (reporting mark, MSCI): This railroad is another owned by Pioneer Rail Corporation, operating three disconnected lines; an 11-mile segment near Iuka, Mississippi; 51 miles between Oxford, Mississippi and Grand Junction, Tennessee; and finally 46 miles between Corinth, Mississippi and Red Bay, Alabama.  The trackage is ex-Illinois Central and was acquired in 1993.  Traffic currently consists of wood products, fertilizer, and feed ingredients.

Mississippi Delta Railroad (reporting mark, MSDR): Operating between Swan Lake and Jonestown, this privately-owned short line covers about 60 miles connecting with the Canadian National at Swan Lake.  The history of the property traces back to the IC, which sold the property around 1985.  Today, the railroad handles corn, cottonseed products, propane, and rubber moving about 1,000 carloads annually.

Mississippi Export Railroad (reporting mark, MSE):  This privately-owned short line was first incorporated in 1922, eventually building a system stretching from Pascagoula to Luce Farms, about 44 miles.  Even today the road continues to operate most of its original main line with a highly maintained right-of-way, connecting with Class Is CSX at Pascagoula and Canadian National in Evanston.

Mississippi Southern Railroad (reporting mark, MSR): Also known as MSR, this Watco short line operates about 28 miles between Newton and Bay Springs, leased through Kansas City Southern.  The short line handles agricultural and lumber products.

Mississippian Railway (reporting mark, MSRW): This short line, dating back to 1923, is owned by Homan Industries and operated by the Mississippian Railway Cooperative utilizing a 25 mile line from Amory (where its shops are located as well as a connection with BNSF) to Fulton. 

Port Bienville Railroad (reporting mark, PBVR):  This short line provides switching and terminal service for the Port Bienville area, operating about 8 miles of trackage in all.  It interchanges with CSX in Ansley.

Redmont Railway (reporting mark, RRC):  This independent short line has operated since 1995 over about 41 miles of track on former Illinois Central trackage.  Its traffic is primarily based in agriculture but does include some other freight.

R.J. Corman Railroad/Tennessee Terminal (reporting mark, RJCK):  This RJ Corman short line leases trackage from BNSF to provide service to customers in southern Memphis to Olive Branch, Mississippi operating 47 miles of trackage in all.  It provides transload services and handles primarily agricultural products.

Vicksburg Southern Railroad (reporting mark, VSOR): The Vicksburg Southern Railroad is another Watco short line operating 21 miles between Redwood and Cedars via Vicksburg, which has been in service since 2006.  It is former Illinois Central property, later acquired by the KCS which purchased short line MidSouth Rail in 1993.  

West Tennessee Railroad (reporting mark, WTNN): This short line operates between Corinth, Mississippi and Fulton, Kentucky on former Gulf, Mobile & Ohio trackage.  It has been in service since 1984, acquired by the Gibson County Railroad Authority that year.  Since then the system has acquired more property through Norfolk Southern handling a wide range of freight.

Missouri Short Line Railroad Guide

Alton & Southern Railway (reporting mark, ALS):  The historic Alton & Southern dates back to 1910 as the Alton & Southern Railroad.  It was incorporated by the Aluminum Company of East St. Louis (later Aluminum Company of America or Alcoa) to provide better switching/terminal service at its plant in East St. Louis.  In 1968 the system was jointly acquired by Chicago & North Western and Missouri Pacific, which renamed it as the Alton & Southern Railway (and acquired its current logo using a combination of its owners' designs).  In 1972 the C&NW sold its interest to the Cotton Belt, a Southern Pacific subsidiary.  Today, the A&S is wholly-owned by Union Pacific, which has since acquired all of the previously mentioned railroads.

Arkansas & Missouri Railroad (reporting mark, AM):   The large A&M has been independently owned since it began service in 1986 over former Frisco property.  The railroad currently operates nearly 140 miles between Fort Smith, Arkansas and Monett, Missouri.  It was long regarded as a haven of classic Alco road-switchers but has since acquired new Electro-Motive SD70ACe models.  To the general public the A&M is a popular excursion railroad offering rides throughout much of the year.  The company's traffic base is highly diversified ranging from paper and lumber to food products and steel.

Bi-State Development Agency Railroad (reporting mark, BSDA): This small terminal railroad operates just 2 miles of track in St. Louis with a connection to the Union Pacific.  The system is owned by the city, which acquired the property from NS on June 17, 1989. It is contracted out to Respondek which switches Amoco Additives Division and the former Shell Oil facility, now known as Equillion.

Central Midland Railway (reporting mark, CMR):  This short line is owned by Progressive Rail Incorporated and operates a segment of the Rock Island's former St. Louis - Kansas City main line.  The route totals 255 miles between Vigus and Pleasant Hill, Missouri but only 42 miles between Vigus and Union is currently in service. 

Columbia Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, COLT): The "COLT", as it is also known, operates between Columbia and Centralia connecting with Norfolk Southern in the latter city.  The property, former Wabash trackage, was acquired from the Class I by the city of Columbia during early October of 1987.  It currently handles more than 1,500 carloads annually.

Kansas City Terminal Railway (reporting mark, KCT): This terminal railroad, which has been in operation since 1906 serves the city of Kansas City providing switching service for the larger railroads which operate through the area.

Kaw River Railroad (reporting mark, KAW):  Another Watco shortline, the Kaw River Railroad operates 27 miles of disconnected track in Missouri near Kansas City.  The first 12 miles between Birmingham and Kearney went into service in 2004 while in 2007 an additional 15 miles of industrial track for switching nearby Bedford Yard was also added to the system.  The road handles about 15,000 carloads annually.

Manufacturers Railway (reporting mark, MRS): This historic railroad was owned by the Anheuser-Busch brewing company and has operated since 1887.  In 2011 the railroad was sold to Foster Townsend Rail Logistics (reporting mark, FTRL) which continues to provide switching and terminal service to the brewery as well as other industries in South St. Louis.  It interchanges with the Terminal Railroad Assocoation of St. Louis (TRRA) and the Alton & Southern.

Missouri & Northern Arkansas Railroad (reporting mark, MNA):  This regional system began in 1992, acquiring more than 102 miles from Union Pacific late that year.  For many years it was under RailAmerica before this company was purchased by G&W in 2012.  Today, the M&NA operates nearly 600 miles of track, much of which is leased from UP and BNSF, extending from southeastern Missouri to northern Arkansas.  Its annual carloads exceed 100,000 and range from unit coal trains to general merchandise.

Missouri & Valley Park Railroad (reporting mark, MVP): This small short line began service in 2002 to serve industries between East and West Valley Park, about 2.14 miles.

Ozark Valley Railroad (reporting mark, OVRR): This short line operates about 27 miles of trackage between Mexico and Fulton, acquired from Kansas City Southern.  It is privately owned by Mike Williams and serves an industrial park near Mexico.

SEMO Port Railroad (reporting mark, SE): This terminal railroad serves the Semo Port located near Scott City, Missouri with connections to Class Is Union Pacific and BNSF Railway. It is former Missouri Pacific property acquired by the Southeast Missouri Regional Port Authority on October 28, 1994 from Union Pacific.  Its traffic consists of grain, cement, plastics, agricultural products, chemicals, and some hazard waste.

South Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad (reporting mark, SKOL): The SK&O is another  Watco regional railroad Tulsa, Oklahoma to several points throughout southeastern Kansas including Winfield, Humboldt, and Pittsburg among others.  The collection of lines trace their roots back to the Missouri Pacific, St. Louis-San Francisco, and Santa Fe.  Its property totals 404 miles and annual carloads exceed 50,000 moving such products as agriculture, cement, coal, chemicals, steel, and plastics.

Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis (reporting mark, TRRA):  This historic terminal road has served the area around St. Louis since it was created in 1889 to provide switching services for the major railroads serving St. Louis Union Station.  Today, it handles only freight service and remains under Class I ownership including BNSF Railway, Union Pacific, CSX Transportation, Norfolk Southern, and Canadian National.

Montana Short Line Railroad Guide

Butte, Anaconda & Pacific Railway (reporting mark, BAP): The BA&P is a historic short line based in Anaconda, Montana that dates back to 1892. The railroad was once electrified, utilizing a 2,400-volt, DC system until 1967 when diesels took over. For years it hauled copper ore mined near Butte, to smelters located at Anaconda. Today, the company is owned by the Patriot Rail Corporation, which acquired the property from the Raurus Railway (reporting mark, RARW) in 2007.  The latter company had owned the property since May 1, 1985 and changed the name but following Patriot Rail's takeover it was returned as the BA&P.  Today, it continues operating 25.7 miles between Anaconda and Butte with traffic consisting of scrap, copper slag, and copper concentrates.  The longtime interchange with the Milwaukee Road at Butte is no more but the short line connects there with BNSF.

Central Montana Rail, Inc. (reporting mark, CM):  This short line has operated since 1985 when it acquired a section of the Milwaukee Road's former Northern Montana line between Moccasin and Geraldine that once reached Great Falls.  The rest of the property is former Great Northern.  It primarily moves agricultural traffic while also hosting a seasonal dinner train known as "Charlie Russell Chew Choo."

Dakota, Missouri Valley & Western Railroad (reporting mark, DMVW):  This large, privately-owned system operates more than 500 miles of trackage (including trackage rights) in the states of North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana that was formerly owned by the Soo Line.  The road's traffic is largely agriculture and it has been in operation since 1990.

Mission Mountain Railroad (reporting mark, MMT):  This short line has been in operation since December of 2004 and operates 40 miles of disconnected trackage that was formerly owned by Great Northern.  The property is currently a Watco subsidiary handling nearly 10,000 carloads annually.

Montana Rail Link (reporting mark, MRL):  This large, Class II regional has been in service since 1987 when it acquired a large segment of the former Northern Pacific main line between Montana and Washington.  Today, the road operates between Huntley, Montana to Sand Point, Idaho with trackage rights stretching to Spokane, Washington.  There are also a handful of branches under its ownership.  In all, MRL owns more than 900 miles and moves more than 410,000 carloads annually.

Yellowstone Valley Railroad (reporting mark, YSVR): Another Watco shortline, this railroad operates more than 170 miles of former Great Northern trackage in northeastern Montana, stretching into North Dakota.  It began service in late 2005 and handles traffic related to the natural gas industry including natural gas, crude oil, and frac sand.

Nebraska Short Line Railroad Guide

Brandon Railroad (reporting mark, BRAN): This terminal railroad operates about 17 miles of track around Omaha connecting with Union Pacific and BNSF.  It took over the former South Omaha Terminal Railway in 1978, which traced its history back to 1927.

Nebkota Railway (reporting mark, NRI):  This short line started operations in 1994 over 73 miles of a former C&NW line between Merriman and Chadron, serving primarily grain elevators and related agricultural businesses.  Since then, about half of the trackage has been abandoned.  The property was acquired by John Nielsen, owner of the Nebraska Northwestern Railroad, in 2013.

Nebraska Central Railroad (reporting mark, NCRC):  The Nebraska Central is a subsidiary of the Rio Grande Pacific Corporation that originally began service in 1993.  Today, it operates 340 miles of former C&NW and UP trackage west of Omaha.  Traffic is largely grain and general agriculture.

Nebraska, Kansas & Colorado Railway (reporting mark, NKCR):  This Class II, regional is another OmniTRAX property and operates roughly 559 miles of disconnected track predominantly based in Kansas but also reaches Sterling, Colorado.  It has been in service since 1996 with traffic largely made up of coal movements while it also handles wheat, corn, and fertilizer.

Nebraska Northwestern Railroad (reporting mark, NNW):  This short line began operations in 2010 over a former section of the C&NW's "Cowboy Line" between Dakota Junction and Chadron (about 7 miles), previously operated by Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern.  With its ownership of the Nebkota Railway the property totals nearly 12 miles.  The road moves grain and handles car repairs at a former C&NW roundhouse.

Omaha, Lincoln & Beatrice Railway (reporting mark, OLB): The historic OL&B dates back to 1903 as an interurban railroad, which is also well known as the "The Big Red Line". Today, the short line performs mostly switching duties serving the town of Lincoln with connections to both Union Pacific and BNSF Railway.  Its customers include agriculture companies, cement plants, and lumber companies.  Other services include transloading, car repair, car storage, and track repair. 

Sidney & Lowe Railroad (reporting mark, SLGG):  This small switching road has slowly grown over the years from its start in 1980 to service a car repair and maintenance facility to later handling grain shipments.   It has been owned by Progress Rail Service since 1996.

New Hampshire Short Line Railroad Guide

Claremont Concord Railroad (reporting mark, CCRR): The history of this short line, built as the Claremont & Concord, dates as far back as 1848 and eventually connected its namesake towns.  For many years it was a subsidiary of Boston & Maine, and once even offered electrified interurban service.  Today, it operates about 3 miles of remaining trackage in the Concord area providing car repair, bulk transload service, and general freight service.

New England Central Railroad (reporting mark, NECR): The New England Central has been in service since 1995 when it acquired the assets of the historic Central Vermont Railway, sold by Canadian National that year to RailTex Corporation which subsequently renamed the property.  This company was acquired by RailAmerica in 2000 which was purchased by G&W in 2012.  Today, the Class II, regional operates 394 miles and handles nearly 40,000 carloads annually. Its freight is highly diversified including lumber, panels & plywood, poles, newsprint, printing paper, compressed gas, chemicals, fuel oils, road salt, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, fabricated metals, resins, TOFC/COFC, finished vehicles, feed mill ingredients, machinery and equipment, recyclables, ash, construction debris, foodstuffs and non-metallic minerals.

New Hampshire Central Railroad (reporting mark, NHCR): This privately owned short line operates two unconnected sections of track in western New Hampshire from Littleton to Groveton and also from North Stratford to Colebrook.  Along with general freight service the company offers car storage, car repair, transload, and locomotive repair services.

New Hampshire Northcoast Corporation (reporting mark, NHN): This privately-owned short line has been in operation since 1986, operating the Boston & Maine's former Conway Branch between Ossipee and Rollinsford, New Hampshire right on the Maine border.  Its traffic consists primarily of aggregates.

Pan Am Railways (reporting mark, PAR):  The Pan Am is the renamed Guilford Transportation system.  These large regional has served much of New England since 1981 when it began acquiring such classic system as Maine Central, Boston & Maine, Portland Terminal, and Springfield Terminal.  In 2006 it changed its name to Pan Am Railways.  Today, it operates roughly 1,700 miles with primary traffic including grain, coal, sand/aggregates, food products, lumber, paper/pulpwood, chemicals and plastics, petroleum, processed minerals, metals, scrap metal, automobiles, and intermodal.

New Jersey Short Line Railroad Guide

Belvidere & Delaware River Railway (reporting mark, BDRV):  This short line began service in 1995 when it acquired former Conrail trackage in western New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania between West Easton, Phillipsburg, and Milford.

Black River & Western Railroad (reporting mark, BRW): This short line was started in 1961, initially as a tourist railroad planned by a father and son. Today, it is owned by the Black River Railroad (headquartered in Ringoes, New Jersey) and has since expanded to offer common-carrier freight service operating a former CNJ branch between Flemington and Three Bridges. 

Cape May Seashore Lines (reporting mark, CMSL): This freight line and tourist railroad operates former Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines trackage acquired from Conrail in 1983 totaling about 27 miles in Cape May County.  

East Jersey Railroad & Terminal Company (reporting mark, EJR): This small terminal road operates about 2 miles of trackage in Bayonne, switching local customers and interchanging with CSX.

Hainesport Industrial Railroad (reporting mark, HIRR):  This terminal road provides service in the Hainesport area shipping steel, aggregates, lumber, wallboard, trash, and other freight while also offering transload services.

New Jersey Rail Carriers, LLC (reporting mark, NJRC): This terminal railroad provides switching services for industries located in or near Kearny.  Its primary freight includes lumber, aggregates, and manufacturing. 

New York & Greenwood Lake Railway (reporting mark, NYGL):  The NY&GL is privately owned and based in Passaic, New Jersey on trackage formerly owned by the Erie.  It began operations in 1996, taking over the property from Conrail, and currently interchanges with NS in Garfield.  Its services include general freight business and transload operations.

New York New Jersey Rail, LLC (reporting mark, NYNJ): This terminal railroad provides switching services between Jersey City, New Jersey and Brooklyn, New York. It is the last surviving carfloat railroad remaining on the harbor (years ago there were dozens). The railroad has been in operation since 2006 taking over for what was previously known as the New York Cross Harbor Railroad but further history traces the property back to the classic waterfront lines like the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal Company (BEDT).

New York, Susquehanna & Western Railway (reporting mark, NYSW): This historic regional, also affectionately known as the "Susie-Q", dates back to 1881 and today connects New Jersey, New York, and extreme northeastern Pennsylvania (the railroad reaches as far north as Utica and Syracuse) via trackage rights over Norfolk Southern.  The road handles a wide range of freight from agriculture to intermodal.

Raritan Central Railway (reporting mark, RCRY):  This short line is based in Edison, New Jersey and services customers along the Raritan River located within the Raritan Center and Heller Industrial Parks.  The road interchanges with both NS and CSX.

SMS Rail Service, Inc. (reporting mark, SLRS): Also known as SMS Lines, this short line provides rail service for the Bridgeport, New Jersey region as well as Guilderland, New York.  It has been in operation since 1994 and services three industrial parks at Morrisville (Pennsylvania), Pureland (New Jersey), and Guilderland Center (New York).  It interchanges with both CSX and CP.  The road is well-known in the railfan community for its use, and affinity for, Baldwin road-switchers.  

Southern Railroad Company Of New Jersey (reporting mark, SRNJ):  This road, owned by J.P. Rail, Inc., initiated service in 1991 on ex-Jersey Central trackage between Winslow and Vineland, about 15.5 miles.  It also operates about 31 miles between Winslow and Pleasantville along with a section of the former Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines between Salem and Swedesboro.

Morristown & Erie Railway (reporting mark, ME):  The historic Morristown & Erie dates back to 1903, formed via merger of the Whippany & Passaic River and Whippany River Railroads.  These two systems formed a network running between Whippany, Morristown, and Essex Falls.  Today, these line runs only as far as Roseland but the M&E has since acquired a handful of short branches from Conrail during the 1980s.  With trackage rights the road operates between Hackettstown and Waldlick via Newark handling a wide range of freight.

Winchester & Western Railroad (reporting mark, WW): The W&W's primary line runs from Gore, Virginia to Hagerstown, Maryland although the company also has New Jersey operations.   The company was chartered in 1916 to haul forest products and connect with the B&O at Winchester.  At its peak it ran from that point to Wardensville, West Virginia but by the 1940s operated no further than Gore, its current western end-of-track.  In 1986 it acquired the former PRR between Winchester and Williamsport, Maryland allowing it to reach Hagerstown (54 miles in all).  Soon after it picked up former Central Railroad of New Jersey property in southern New Jersey.  These two segments currently make up the W&W as its "Virginia Division" and "New Jersey Division."  

New Mexico Short Line Railroad Guide

Arizona Eastern Railway (reporting mark, AZER):  The Arizona Eastern is a large operation utilizing more than 200 miles of trackage between Clifton and Miami, Arizona while it briefly enters New Mexico.  For more many years the property was owned by Southern Pacific before spun-off to RA in 2001.  In 2004 it was sold to Permian Basin Railways, which subsequently sold it to G&W in 2011.  Traffic today includes copper, chemicals, agricultural, and forest products.

Navajo Mine Railroad (reporting mark, TNMR):  This privately owned, electrifed operation's sole purpose is to shuttle coal from BHP Billiton's Navajo Coal Mine to the the Four Corners Generating Station.  It has been in operation since 1974 and was expanded in 1984, currently operated 14 miles of track.  There is no connection with the national rail network.

Santa Fe Southern Railway (reporting mark, SFSR): This short line provides freight and excursion service over the former AT&SF's Santa Fe branch between Santa Fe and the transcontinental main line at Lamy, 18 mils in all.  It has been in operation since 1992.

Texas-New Mexico Railroad (reporting mark, TNMR): The Texas-New Mexico is owned by Iowa Pacific Holdings and operates just over 100 miles of trackage (formerly, Texas & Pacific/Missouri Pacific) between Monahans, Texas and Lovington, New Mexico with a connection to the Union Pacific at the former location.  The trackage is former Texas & Pacific/Missouri Pacific.  It was sold to RailTex in 1989 by UP, acquired by RailAmerica in 1999, and then purchased by Permian Basin Railways in 2002 before its takeover by Iowa Pacific.  Its traffic currently consist of oilfield chemicals and minerals, construction aggregates, industrial waste, and scrap.  In 2011 the road embarked in a major upgrading of the property to handle increased freight demands.

New York Short Line Railroad Guide

Albany Port Railroad (reporting mark, APD):  This terminal road, jointly owned by CSX/CP, is located at the Port of Albany and primarily switches a grain facility. 

Arcade & Attica Railroad (reporting mark, ARA):  The historic Arcade & Attica has been in operation since 1917 when acquired the assets of former bankrupt companies serving Arcade and Attica dating as far back as the Attica & Sheldon Railroad of 1836 (which was ultimately never built).  Rail service finally commenced in 1881.  Today, the A&A operates only between Arcade and North Java as the rest was abandoned in 1957.  Freight currently consists of agricultural products, lumber, dairy feed, and other freight.  The railroad also offers excursion service to the general public.

Batten Kill Railroad (reporting mark, BKRR):  This short line has been in operation since 1982 operating roughly 34 miles of former Delaware & Hudson branch lines between Eagle Bridge (and a connection with the Pan Am Railway) and Salem via Greenwich Junction.  Its traffic consists of grain, fertilizer, logs, and wood pulp.

Buffalo & Pittsburgh Railroad (reporting mark, BPRR): This regional is part of the Genesee & Wyoming's large family of railroads, operating 368 miles of trackage in northwestern Pennsylvania and western New York.  The history of the property dates back to the B&O/BR&P, acquired from CSX in 1988.  It currently serves a multitude of customers moving aggregates, brick/cement, automotive, chemicals, coal, food/feed products, forest products, metallic ores/minerals, and steel/scrap.

Buffalo Southern Railroad (reporting mark, BSOR):  The Buffalo Southern began operations in 1982 between Buffalo and Gowanda, interchanging there with the New York & Lake Erie.  The history of the line dates back to the Erie Railroad and was sold by Conrail.  The road's current traffic consists of petroleum products, lumber, concrete, agriculture, animal feed, fertilizer, manufacturing products, and paper.

Central New York Railroad (reporting mark, CNYK): This medium-sized short line operates about 123-miles leased track between Binghamton and Port Jervis owned by NS.  The railroad began in 1972 operating trackage purchased from EL between Cassville and Richfield Springs.  The road went dormant after abandoning this line in 1995 but was brought back in 2004 under Delaware Otsego by leasing from NS the former Erie's Southern Tier (Binghamton-Port Jervis).

Depew, Lancaster & Western Railroad (reporting mark, DLWR):  This short line is a Genesee Valley Transportation (GVT) property that has been in service since 1989, operating two disconnected lines of Lackawanna and Lehigh Valley heritage; one operates between Lancaster and Cheektowaga and the other between Lockport and Brockport.  Combined the trackage totals 14 miles with freight including fertilizers, plastics, metals, petroleum products, forest products, oraw materials and finished products.

Falls Road Railroad (reporting mark, FRR):  Another GVT property, the Falls Road has been in service since 1996 operating 45 miles of former Conrail trackage in western New York.  The road's freight is based primarily in bulk commodities, agriculture, food products, petroleum, and chemicals.

Finger Lakes Railway (reporting mark, FGLK):  The Finger Lakes began in 1995 when it acquired 118 miles of former NYC, LV, and PRR disconnected trackage south and west of Syracuse known as the "Geneva Cluster" by Conrail.  Today, the system operates a total of 154 miles and moves more than 18,000 carloads while serving some 54 customers.  

Housatonic Railroad (reporting mark, HRRC):  The historic Housatonic Railroad has been around since its chartering in 1840.  It eventually grew into a rather substantial system serving western Connecticut, and southwestern Massachusetts.  It was long part of New Haven's Berkshire Division since first leased in 1892 but "regained" its independence more than 90 years later when Conrail sold sections of the original to a new Housatonic Railroad in 1983.  Today, the short line operates much of the original route between New Haven and Pittsfield with a western extension to Newburgh, New York.  It remains independently owned moving a wide variety of freight.  Additionally, there has been of initiating commuter rail service and the Berkshire Scenic Railway Museum hosts excursions on a section of the property.

Kodak Park Railroad (reporting mark, KPRR): This privately-owned short line controlled by the Eastman Kodak Company services the Kodak Park in Rochester, New York.  It handles about 15,000 carloads annually moving coal, forest products, plastics, and chemicals.

Livonia, Avon & Lakeville Railroad (reporting mark, LAL):  This long-operating short line traces its history back to 1964 when it acquired 13 miles of former Erie trackage between Lakeville, Avon, and north of Industry.  More trackage was acquired from Conrail in 1996 and the road now operates over 400 miles in western New York and northwestern Pennsylvania.  

Massena Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, MSTR):  This terminal road is a property of Genesee & Wyoming since 2012, which acquired RailAmerica (the latter company had owned the railroad since 2005).  Its history traces back to 1900 providing switching services.  Today, it serves the Alcoa plant near Massena and moves primarily aluminum and petroleum products.

Middletown & New Jersey Railway (reporting mark, MNJ):  This short line operates 43 miles of disconnected trackage between Middletown and Slate Hill as well as between Walden/Montgomery and Warwick (with trackage rights between Campbell Hall and Hudson Junction.  The road also services a short branch to Greycourt.  Its traces its history back to 1947 and currently serves several transload facilities.

Mohawk, Adirondack & Northern Railroad (reporting mark, MHWA):  This short line is another GVT property, operating 124 miles of disconnected lines between Utica and Lyons Falls as well as between Lowville and Newton Falls (with a branch to Croghan operated by the Lowville & Beaver River).  The road also serves the Griffiss Industrial Park in Rome.  Its traffic consists of steel, stone, ores, chemicals, fertilizers, plastics, paper products, forest products, and food products.

New York & Atlantic Railway (reporting mark, NYA):  This short line is an Anacostia Rail Holdings property that began service in 1997 to provide freight service over the historic Long Island Rail Road trackage (that railroad now provides only commuter service).  The road is contracted to serve the entire 269 mile system and handles roughly 28,000 carloads annually.

New York & Lake Erie Railroad (reporting mark, NYLE):  This short line has been in operation since 1978 when it acquired from Conrail former Erie trackage between Conrail and Waterboro with a branch to Cattaraugus.  The railroad also provides excursion service to the general public.

New York New Jersey Rail, LLC (reporting mark, NYNJ): This terminal railroad provides switching services between Jersey City, New Jersey and Brooklyn, New York. It is the last surviving carfloat railroad remaining on the harbor (years ago there were dozens). The railroad has been in operation since 2006 taking over for what was previously known as the New York Cross Harbor Railroad but further history traces the property back to the classic waterfront lines like the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal Company (BEDT).

New York, Susquehanna & Western Railway (reporting mark, NYSW): This historic regional, also affectionately known as the "Susie-Q", dates back to 1881 and today connects New Jersey, New York, and extreme northeastern Pennsylvania (the railroad reaches as far north as Utica and Syracuse) via trackage rights over Norfolk Southern.  The road handles a wide range of freight from agriculture to intermodal.

Ontario Midland Railroad (reporting mark, OMID): This railroad has been in operation since 1979 and operates former PRR and NYC lines; one between Hannibal and Webster, and the other between Hojack and Newark. Overall, the short line operates just under 60 miles of track.  It serves a handful of customers moving everything from food products to chemicals.

Owego & Harford Railway (reporting mark, OHRY):  This short line leases nearly 27 miles of trackage from the Tioga County Industrial Development Agency between Owego and Harford Mills.  The road first began service in 1992 and handles over 4,000 carloads annually.  The property also hosts excursions as the Tioga Scenic Railroad.

Rochester & Southern Railroad (reporting mark, RSR):  This G&W property is one of the company's earliest dating back to 1986 when it acquired former Baltimore & Ohio/Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh trakage from CSX east of Pittsburgh.  Currently, the R&S operates between Buffalo, Irondequoit and Dansville, about 58 miles.  It handles aggregates, brick/cement, chemicals, coal, food/feed products, forest products, and steel/scrap.

SMS Rail Service, Inc. (reporting mark, SLRS): Also known as SMS Lines, this short line provides rail service for the Bridgeport, New Jersey region as well as Guilderland, New York.  It has been in operation since 1994 and services three industrial parks at Morrisville (Pennsylvania), Pureland (New Jersey), and Guilderland Center (New York).  It interchanges with both CSX and CP.  The road is well-known in the railfan community for its use, and affinity for, Baldwin road-switchers.  

Wellsboro & Corning Railroad (reporting mark, WCOR): The Wellsboro & Corning Railroad, a G&W property, operates a 38-mile system connecting its namesake cities and serving several industries along the route. It interchanges with both Norfolk Southern and Canadian Pacific.  The road first entered service in 1993 on former NYC trackage and current handles traffic related to the Marcellus Shale natural gas industry such as fracking sand.  It also offers transloading and car repair service.

Western New York & Pennsylvania Railroad (reporting mark, WNYP):  This privately-owned short line began service in 2001 after acquiring from NS former Erie Southern Tier trackage, and later ex-PRR lines.   It currently operates some 330 miles in northwestern Pennsylvania and western New York, south of Buffalo.  The road serves numerous customers and is known within the railfan community for its use of Alco road-switchers.

North Carolina Short Line Railroad Guide

Aberdeen & Rockfish Railroad (reporting mark, AR):  The historic Aberdeen & Rockfish has been family owned since it was chartered during 1892 by John Blue.  The road was built to serve the region's timber industry but has since transitioned to serve a wide range of customers on its main line between Fayetteville and Aberdeen via Raeford (about 47 miles).  Today its freight consists of lumber, forest products, building materials, chemicals, bulk commodities, fertilizer, and other traffic.  It also owns the small Pee Dee River Railway in northern South Carolina.

Aberdeen, Carolina & Western Railway (reporting mark, ACWR):  The AC&W began in 1987 when it acquired a former Norfolk Southern line between Aberdeen and Star as part of the Class I's Thoroughbred Shortline Program.  It also leases additional trackage between Charlotte and Gulf.  The road currently serves nearly two-dozen customers while also offering transload service, car storage and repair, locomotive leasing, and other services.

Alexander Railroad (reporting mark, ARC): This historic railroad, also known as "The Junebug Line," dates back to 1946 when it was started to take over an abandoned Southern Railway branch, operates about 20 miles of track between Statesville and Taylorsville, North Carolina.  Today, it still operates this line serving 20 customers and handling about 2,500 carloads annually.

Atlantic & Western Railway (reporting mark, ATW):  This G&W property (since 2005) operates a short, 11-mile stretch of track north and south of Sanford.  The history of the line traces back to 1896 and once ran between Sanford and Lillington, 25 miles.  Its current traffic consists of aggregates, brick/cement, food/feed products, and steel/scrap.

Caldwell County Railroad (reporting mark, CWCY): The Caldwell County Railroad began service in 1994, operating 17 miles of track connecting Hickory and Lenoir, acquired from NS that year.  The line's history dates back to the Southern and today about about 12 miles remain in service to Valmead.  It serves a handful of customers moving slightly over 400 carloads per year. 

Carolina Coastal Railway (reporting mark, CLNA): This short line has been in service since 1989 acquiring former NS property through its Thoroughbred Shortline Program.  Currently it operates 142 miles between Raleigh and Plymouth as well as a 17-mile line between Belhaven and Pinetown.  The road's traffic is primarily agriculture based.

Carolina Southern Railroad (reporting mark, CALA):  This short line began service in 1995 taking over from the Waccamaw Coast Line a former CSX branch between Florence, South Carolina and Wilmington, North Carolina as well as the branch to Myrtle Beach.  The route's history traces back to the Atlantic Coast Line.  It has not seen freight service since 2012 while awaiting repairs to bridges along the route.  However, a potential buyer for the line has been found and service hopes to resume in 2015 following repairs.

Chesapeake & Albemarle Railroad (reporting mark, CA):  The C&A began service in 1990 by acquiring a section of the original Norfolk Southern from NS through the Class I's Thoroughbred Shortline Program running between South Norfolk, Virginia and Edenton, North Carolina via Elizabeth City.  This original section of the old NS main line was acquired by RailAmerica in 2000 and is today a G&W property handling about 6,000 carloads annually.

Clinton Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, CTR):  This privately-owned terminal road began operations in 1994 taking over from the Waccamaw Short Line about 3 miles serving the Clinton area, and adopting its current name in 1995.  It serves local business parks and provides transload services.

High Point, Thomasville & Denton Railroad (reporting mark, HPTD): This historic railroad, dating to 1923, is owned by the Winston-Salem Southbound Railway (jointly owned by CSX and NS), operating between High Point and High Rock (20 miles). 

Laurinburg & Southern Railroad (reporting mark, LRS):  The historic Laurinburg & Southern is a short line dating back to 1909 running between Laurinburg and Wagram.  The road has been owned by Gulf & Ohio Railways since 1994 and currently handles freight including animal feed, soda ash, lime, fertilizer, chemicals, and glass.  It relies largely on switchers as standard road power.

Morehead & South Fork Railroad (reporting mark, MHSF): Another Gulf & Ohio property this terminal railroad serves the Port of Morehead and has been in service since 2005.  It has been leased by Carolina Coastal since 2010 handling about 3,000 carloads annually.

North Carolina & Virginia Railroad (reporting mark, NCVA): The NC&V is another G&W short line and operates 135 miles of track between Tunis, North Carolina and Boykins, Virginia and a connection with CSX.  It began in 1987 acquiring former Seaboard Air Line property in its namesake states.  It was acquired by RailAmerica in 2000 before that company was taken over by G&W in 2012.  Its traffic currently consists of steel plates, steel scrap, soybeans, chemicals, and fertilizer.

Thermal Belt Railway (reporting mark, TBRY): This short line operates just about 9 miles of track between Bostic and Spindale with a connection to CSX at Thermal.  It has been in service since 1990 when it acquired about 16 miles of former SAL trackage from CSX.  Since then, about 7 miles have been abandoned.  It's only current traffic is a small transload facility.

Virginia Southern Railroad (reporting mark, VSRR): The Virginia Southern Railroad is owned by the North Carolina & Virginia (a G&W subsidiary), operating between Oxford, North Carolina and Burkeville, Virginia.  It first began service in 1988 through the NS Thoroughbred Program over former Southern trackage.

Wilmington Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, WTRY):  This terminal road switches the Port of Wilmington, which began operations in 1986.  It has been under G&W control since 2005 handling chemicals, forest products, pulp/paper products, petroleum products, and steel.

Yadkin Valley Railroad (reporting mark, YVRR): This railroad is another G&O property that owns 93 miles of track between Mount Airy and North Wilkesboro.  It first began service in 1989 over former Southern trackage, another short line created through the Thoroughbred Program.  The road's traffic today totals nearly 13,000 annual carloads including poultry feed ingredients, wood products, steel, plastics, propane, ethanol, and rail car storage.

North Dakota Short Line Railroad Guide

Dakota, Missouri Valley & Western Railroad (reporting mark, DMVW):  This large, privately-owned system operates more than 500 miles of trackage (including trackage rights) in the states of North Dakota, South Dakota, and Montana that was formerly owned by the Soo Line.  The road's traffic is largely agriculture and it has been in operation since 1990.

Dakota Northern Railroad (reporting mark, DN): This short line carrier began operation only in 2006 that originally operated 72 miles of trackage in northeastern North Dakota that is formerly Great Northern and part of which is leased by BNSF. Since then, about 18 miles have been abandoned.  The road is privately-owned by the KBN Incorporated and Independent Locomotive Service.

Northern Plains Railroad (reporting mark, NPR): This privately-owned, short line railroad is mostly concentrated in North Dakota, leasing nearly 400 miles of track from carriers such as Canadian Pacific and Mohall Central Railroad.  The history of its properties traces back to the Soo, GN, and NP.  Its traffic consists primarily of agricultural products and it handles about 17,000 carloads annually.

Red River Valley & Western Railroad (reporting mark, RRVW):  Under common ownership with the Twin Cities & Western, the RRV&W is a 600+ mile regional operating former Burlington Northern trackage mostly located in North Dakota northwest of Wahpeton with lines stretching into extreme western Minnesota.  The road began service in 1987 and its traffic base is very diversified.

Yellowstone Valley Railroad (reporting mark, YSVR): Another Watco shortline, this railroad operates more than 170 miles of former Great Northern trackage in northeastern Montana, stretching into North Dakota.  It began service in late 2005 and handles traffic related to the natural gas industry including natural gas, crude oil, and frac sand.

Ohio Short Line Railroad Guide

Ashland Railway (reporting mark, ASRY):  This short line began operations in 1986 over former Erie/Erie Lackawanna between West Salem and Mansfield as well as the ex-B&O between Willard and Mansfield acquired from CSX in 1990.  Today, it operates about 55 miles of track.

Ashtabula, Carson & Jefferson Railroad (reporting mark, ACJ):  This short line operates 6 miles between Carson and Jefferson over the former NYC and has been in service since 1984 when the property was acquired from Conrail.  The AC&J's traffic consists of plastic pellets, fertilizer, and paper while it also offers transload services.

Camp Chase Industrial Railroad (reporting mark, CCRA): This terminal railroad, owned by Carload Express, Inc., serves western Columbus, switching a number of industries in the area operating about 14 miles of track.  It owns a former section of the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis's main line, which later became part of NYC's route to St. Louis.  As a through corridor it was not retained under Conrail and the section now comprising the CCRA was purchased from the Class I in October of 1994.

Central Railroad of Indiana (reporting mark, CIND): This medium-sized carrier operates 96 miles of former NYC trackage between Cincinnati, Ohio and Shelbyville, Indiana.  It has been in service since 1992 and was acquired by RailAmerica in 2000 before G&W ownership in 2012.  Today, its traffic base includes automobiles, chemicals, metals, aggregates while moving more than 11,000 carloads annually.

Chicago, Fort Wayne & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, CFE):  This Genesee & Wyoming road (formerly RailAmerica) began service in 2004 over PRR's former Fort Wayne Line between Gary, Indiana and Crestline, Ohio with a branch reaching Decatur.  It operates roughly 315 miles in total with freight consisting of lumber, paper, chemicals, steel beams, shelled corn, and other hazardous materials.

Cleveland Commercial Railroad (reporting mark, CCR): This small short line serves industries near the city of Cleveland and has been in operation since 2009, leasing two lines from NS that run from near downtown to nearby Glenwillow and Solon (about 35 miles in all).  Its traffic includes scrap metal, sand, manufactured goods, food products, and chemicals while also offering transload service.

Cleveland Harbor Belt (reporting mark, CHB): This terminal road also operates in along the lakefront serving the Port of Cleveland, utilizing about 1 total mile of track.  The road began operations on August 1, 2012.

Columbus & Ohio River Rail Road (reporting mark, CUOH): This large short line, a G&W property, serves central and eastern Ohio operating 247 miles of track between Mingo Junction at the border of West Virginia with Columbus.  There are also branches reaching Mt. Vernon, Zanesville, Cambridge, Cadiz, and Hebron.  It was formerly part of Class II, regional Ohio Central until purchased by G&W in 2008.  Its traffic consists of chemicals, coal, farming products, food products, pulp/paper products, and steel/waste.

Flats Industrial Railroad (reporting mark, FIR):  This terminal/switching road operates in the Cleveland area operating 4 miles of trackage.  It has been in service since 1996.

Indiana & Ohio Railway (reporting mark, IORY):  This short line has been in service since 1985 when it acquired a former NYC branch between Valley Junction, Ohio and Brookville, Indiana.  In the succeeding years the I&O picked up several more routes being shed by Class Is with histories tracing back to the PRR, Baltimore & Ohio, and Chesapeake & Ohio that stretched as far as Dundee, Michigan.  For many years it was owned by RailAmerica whose assets were acquired by G&W in 2012.  Today, the I&O operates about 570 miles and hauls metal products, chemicals, plastics, lumber, paper, agricultural products, and distillers grains.

Indiana Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, IERR): This privately owned short line, a subsidiary of the Respondek Railroad, leases 43-miles from CSX between Richmond, Indiana and Fernald, Ohio that previously dated back to Chesapeake & Ohio ownership.  The road has been in service since 2005.

Indiana Northeastern Railroad (reporting mark, IN):  This short line traces its history back to the Pigeon River Railroad of 1992.  Today, the company has blossomed into a 120-mile system serving northeastern Indiana, southern Michigan, and northwestern Ohio much of which dates back to NYC heritage.  The road's traffic base consist of coal, agriculture, sand, glass, steel, and other freight.

Lake Terminal Railroad (reporting mark, LT):  This historic terminal road dates back to its incorporation on September 13, 1895, projected to serve a mill in the Lorain area.  It was intended to reach both Sandusky and Cleveland but never opened service further than Lorain.  Today, it still functions as switching line and serves the steel industry.

Mahoning Valley Railway (reporting mark, MVRY):  Formerly part of the Ohio Central system, this short line is another Genesee & Wyoming property operating 6 miles of track north of Lowellville.  The system primarily moves steel products.

Napoleon, Defiance & Western Railroad (reporting mark, NDW):  This short line was famously known as the Maumee & Western for many years due to the badly deteriorated track upon which it operated.   It was originally part of the Wabash running between Fort Wayne, Indiana and Napoleon, Ohio (53 miles) and operated by NS until the 1980s when sold to Indiana Hi-Rail.  This company went bankrupt in the mid-1990s when it became the Maumee & Western.  In 2012 Pioneer Railcorp took over the property and renamed it as the ND&W.  Since then the company has performed extensive repairs to improve service.  The road handles food products, chemicals, aggregates, fertilizer, and grain.

Newburgh & South Shore Railroad (reporting mark, NSR): This historic railroad, now an OmniTRAX company, once served the steel mills located near Cleveland. However, today, it operates about 5 miles of track east of the city hauling a wide range of freight such as steel, agriculture, scrap metal, food products, and aggregates.

Northern Ohio & Western Railway (reporting mark, NOW):  This short line, an OmniTRAX property, utilizes a former section of the PRR between Woodville and Tiffin, acquired from Conrail.  It runs about 25 miles with traffic including limestone, lime, magnesite, and pressed board.

Ohi-Rail Corporation (reporting mark, OHIC): This small short line operates 43 miles of former New York Central branch lines between Minerva and Hopedale with connections to Norfolk Southern and Wheeling & Lake Erie.  It began service during the summer of 1982 and has slowly added trackage since that time.  At one time the corridors handled predominantly coal but today moves traffic related to the Utica and Marcellus Shale industries (oil an natural gas).

Ohio Southern Railroad (reporting mark, OSRR): Another Genesee & Wyoming short line the railroad connects Zanesville with New Lexington and Glouster. The company has interchanges with both CSX and Norfolk Southern. It first began service in 1986 and for many years was part of Ohio Central, purchased by G&W in 2008.  There are currently 18 miles of track in service carrying coal and waste.

Republic N&T Railroad (reporting mark, NTRY): This short line has been in operation and leases trackage owned by Norfolk Southern near Canton.   It is a subsidiary of Republic Steel.

R.J. Corman Railroad - Western Ohio Lines (reporting mark, RJCW): RJ Corman operates a variety of rail-related businesses, including short lines. It currently owns to lines in western Ohio that total 94 miles southwest of Lima and in the Greenville area.  Operations began in 1993 and traffic includes grain, fertilizer, aluminum, rubber, food products, plastic, and steel.

U.S. Rail Corporation (reporting mark, USRC): US Rail operates several short lines east of the Mississippi River within the states of New York, Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana.  Its property in Ohio include a terminal service in Cleveland as well as trackage operated around Hamilton and Jackson.

Warren & Trumbull Railroad (reporting mark, WTRM): The W&T is another Genesee & Wyoming short line, that operates just 4 miles of track north of Warren with connections to both CSX and Norfolk Southern.  It first began operations in 1994 and the current trackage is ex-Erie property.  The road's traffic includes plastics and steel.

Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway (reporting mark, WE): The Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway is a privately owned Class II, regional which has been in operation since 1990 carrying the name of the original W&LE. It operates an extensive system stretching across northern Ohio, West Virginia, and western Pennsylvania with trackage rights reaching Cumberland and Hagerstown.  It operates about 575 miles of its own lines as well as an additional 265 via trackage rights.  The road carries more than 130,000 carloads annually with a highly diversified freight base.

Youngstown & Austintown Railroad (reporting mark, YARR): Another Genesee & Wyoming property, the Y&A is also quite small operating just 5 miles of trackage west of Youngstown and also connecting with both NS and CSX.  The trackage is a former Erie branch and traffic includes food products and steel. 

Youngstown Belt Railroad (reporting mark, YB): This short line is Genesee & Wyoming's largest in northeast Ohio operating 13 miles of railroad between Ravenna and Courtland via Warren.  There is also a southern extension to Youngstown.  The Belt has connections to several railroads including NS and CSX.  It first began operations in 1997 and then-owned by Ohio Central, who acquired the property from CSX and Conrail that dated back to the B&O and Erie.  Its current traffic includes aggregates, brick/cement, and steel.

Youngstown & Southeastern Railroad (reporting mark, YSRR): The Y&S is owned by the Indiana Boxcar Corporation and has been in operation since 2006 (formerly operated by the Ohio Central) running between Youngstown, Ohio and Darlington, Pennsylvania, operating about 39 miles.  As of 2014 the property is owned by Mule Sidetracks, LLC and leased to the Y&S for rail service.

Oklahoma Short Line Railroad Guide

Arkansas & Oklahoma Railroad (reporting mark, AOK):  Also referred to as the A-OK Railroad via its reporting marks, this privately-held short line operates segments of the Rock Island's former Choctaw Route between Howe and McAlester as well as between Shawnee and Midwest City, slightly over 100 miles in all.  It has been in service since 1996 and steadily increased its carloadings since then.  The railroad's long term goals include opening more sections of the former Choctaw line.

Arkansas Southern Railroad (reporting mark, ARS): The Arkansas Southern is a Watco property that began service in 2005, leasing 61 miles from KCS via two disconnected lines (Waldron, Arkansas-Heavener, Oklahoma and Ashdown-Nashville).  Its traffic base is unknown.

AT&L Railroad (reporting mark, ATLT): Owned by the Wheeler Brothers Grain Company, this railroad, started in 1985, operates about 50 miles of former Rock Island grain branches running between El Reno (where it interchanges with UP), Watonga, and Bridgeport.  Its current traffic base includes grain, fertilizer and agricultural products.

Blackwell Northern Gateway Railroad (reporting mark, BNG): This small shortline is owned by the Blackwell Industrial Authority Oklahoma Department of Transportation while the line is operated by US Rail Partners.  Its trackage consists of about 35 miles between Blackwell, Oklahoma and Hunnewell, Kansas.  It has been in service since 2002 when it took over operating rights from the South Kansas & Oklahoma.

Cimarron Valley Railroad (reporting mark, CVR):  This large short line operates 254 miles of former Santa Fe trackage in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Colorado.  There are two disconnected lines; one from Dodge City, Kansas to Boise City, Oklahoma while the other runs from Satanta, Kansas to Springfield, Colorado.  Much of the trackage is 10 mph and weed-covered.  Its traffic base is primarily agriculture.

Farmrail Corporation (reporting mark, FMRC):  Farmrail first began service in 1981 when it leased 82 miles of the Rock Island's former Choctaw Route between Weatherford and Erick to serve agriculture interests.  Since then it has picked up more trackage with heritage tracing back to the Santa Fe and Frisco.  Including its subsidiary, the Grainbelt (reporting mark, GNBC), its network totals roughly 350 miles. 

Kiamichi Railroad (reporting mark, KRR):  This large short line operates 261 miles  of track (some of which is trackage rights) running from Hope, Arkansas to west of Durant, Oklahoma along the Red River.  There is also a north-south section running from Paris, Texas to Antlers, Oklahoma.  The route's history traces back to the Frisco, when it was sold in 1987 by Burlington Northern.  RailAmerica acquired the property in 2002 from States Rail before being purchased by G&W in 2012.  Today, traffic consists of coal, lumber, aggregates, minerals, glass, paper, chemicals, cement, pulpwood, feed and food products.

Sand Springs Railway (reporting mark, SS):  This historic company traces its history back to an interurban chartered on February 6, 1911.  It was built to transport passengers from the the suburb of Sand Springs to Tulsa, 10 miles.  However, over the years its developed a profitable carload freight business, allowing it to survive past the end of the interurban era (roughly between 1920 and 1945).  It discontinued electrified/passenger service in 1955 and remains in service today as a short line freight carrier.

Stillwater Central Railroad (reporting mark, SLWC): Another Watco property this large short line operates more than 275 miles of track between Tulsa, Duke, Pawnee, and Stillwater.  It has been in service since 1998 and its traffic has steadily grown over the years where today it includes transload services, agriculture, petroleum products, minerals, and industrial products.

South Kansas & Oklahoma Railroad (reporting mark, SKOL): The SK&O is another  Watco regional railroad Tulsa, Oklahoma to several points throughout southeastern Kansas including Winfield, Humboldt, and Pittsburg among others.  The collection of lines trace their roots back to the Missouri Pacific, St. Louis-San Francisco, and Santa Fe.  Its property totals 404 miles and annual carloads exceed 50,000 moving such products as agriculture, cement, coal, chemicals, steel, and plastics.

Texas, Oklahoma & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, TOE):  The TO&E, also a Patriot Rail subsidiary, operates the other half of the original De Queen & Eastern main line from the Arkansas state line to Valliant, Oklahoma.  Its traffic base is predominantly forest products.

Tulsa-Sapulpa Union Railway (reporting mark, TSU): Another of Oklahoma's historic railroads, the Tulsa-Sapulpa Union connects its namesake cities and dates back to 1907.  It began service as an interurban but suffered a few bankruptcies during its early years.  In 1918 it completed its 25 mile main line between Tulsa, Sapulpa, and Mounds although the extension to the latter town was pulled up in 1928.  Its freight traffic surged thanks largely to the oil boom during the early 20th century.  It suffered one additional bankruptcy in 1929 and acquired its current name in 1943.  Electrified operations were discontinued in 1960 and it currently operates with EMD switchers.  Today, the road's system runs 10 miles between its namesake towns and a 13-mile branch leased from UP between Tulsa and Jenks.

Wichita, Tillman & Jackson Railway (reporting mark, WTJR): The WT&J is currently owned by the Rio Grande Pacific Corporation, running on disconnected trackage in Texas and Oklahoma once owned by the Rock Island and Union Pacific.  It has been in service since 1991.

Oregon Short Line Railroad Guide

Albany & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, AERC): This railroad began operations in 1998 when it took over a former SP branch acquired from BNSF, which was about 50 miles in length between Mill City and Lebanon with extensions to Albany and Sweet Home.  It also operates a short, disconnected segment south of Corvallis.  The short line interchanges with both UP and BNSF.

Central Oregon & Pacific Railroad (reporting mark, CORP): The CO&P is owned by Genesee & Wyoming, operating nearly 400 miles of trackage over the former SP's Siskiyou Line with an entire system running between Weed, California and Eugene, Oregon.  Southern Pacific sold off the property in late 1994 to RailTex, later RailAmerica, which was acquired by G&W in 2012.  Today, traffic stands at about 17,000 carloads annually.

City of Prineville Railway (reporting mark, (COP): Dating back to the early 20th century, this short line operates about 18 miles of railroad between Prineville and Redmond.  The railroad was chartered in 1916 as a means of providing the town rail service after it had been bypassed by the Oregon Trunk Railroad (later SP&S) and Des Chutes Railway.  The system primarily subsisted on forest traffic over the years, which it continues to handle today along with other types of freight, including transload service.

Coos Bay Rail Link (reporting mark, CBR):  This relatively new short line was formed in 2011 to acquire the SP's former Coos Bay Branch between Vaughn and Coquille (134 miles), in danger of abandonment by CO&P.  It is owned by the Port of Coos Bay and traffic currently consists of forest products, fertilizer, chromite ore and dairy feed.

Klamath Northern Railway (reporting mark, KNOR): This small short line dates back to 1940 and operates just under 11 miles of railroad between Gilchrist Junction and Gilchrist, Oregon (the property was originally a private logging line). The road's traffic is based in forest products.

Lake Railway (reporting mark, LRY): Formerly known as the Lake County Railroad this 55-mile short line is mostly timber-based (although handles other traffic, including perlite) running between Perez via Alturas, California and Lakeview, Oregon.  It has been in service since 1997 on property formerly owned by SP.  The property is currently leased and operated by Frontier Rail.

Oregon Pacific Railroad (reporting mark, OPR): The privately-owned, Oregon Pacific Railroad dates back to 1991 to take over the historic Portland Traction Company property located in East Portland. It also operates a former SP branch in 1993 known as the Molalla Branch Division running between Canby and Liberal.  It operates a fleet of switchers and along with freight operations hosts some excursions for the general public as well.

Palouse River & Coulee City Railroad (reporting mark, PCC):  The PR&CC is a Watco property that operates 202 miles of disconnected lines in southeastern Washington, western Idaho, and northeastern Oregon.  All of the lines were acquired from Union Pacific.  Its traffic consists of wheat, lentils, and barley while moving about 4,000 carloads annually.

Peninsula Terminal Company (reporting mark, PT): This terminal railroad dates back to 1924 serving North Portland on just 2 miles of track.  It interchanges with both BNSF and UP while offering transload and cross-docking service while also providing general freight service.

Port of Tillamook Bay Railroad (reporting mark, POTB):  This short line operates the former SP branch to Tillamook Bay between Hillsboro and Tillamook, a distance of 94 miles.  It began service in 1990 handling primarily forest products and became well-known for painting one of its GP9s in the black and white colors of Holstein cattle.  The railroad was severely damaged following heavy flooding in late 2007 and has been out of service ever since.  A few sections are still operated; the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad hosts excursion trains from Garibaldi to Wheeler and the Portland & Western serves customers between Banks and Hillsboro.  The short line still has hopes of restoring the property and commencing freight service one day.

Portland & Western Railroad (reporting mark, PNWR):  This large, Class II regional began service in 1995 when Genesee & Wyoming took over more than 500 miles of former SP property between Astoria, Portland, Eugene, and various other points within the state's northwestern region.  It also acquired part of the former Oregon Electric Railway, a successful interurban that later became part of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle and then Burlington Northern.  The road's traffic is primarily based in forest products but also includes aggregates, brick/cement, chemicals, construction material, food products, animal feed, ores and minerals, and steel/scrap.  It handles more than 60,000 carloads annually.  The P&W also operates a subsidiary known as the Willamette & Pacific Railroad (reporting mark, WPRR).

Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation (reporting mark, RVT): This 14-mile short line owned by RVTR Rail Holdings since 2013 and operates near White City, Oregon to Medford.  It dates back to 1954 utilizing a former SP branch and has changed hands and names a few times over the years.   

Wallowa Union Railroad (reporting mark, WURR): This short line is owned by the local counties of Union and Wallowa and operates 63 miles of a former Union Pacific branch. The railroad also operates excursion trains known as the Eagle Cap Excursion Train for the public in the spring, summer, and early fall.

Willamette Valley Railway (reporting mark, WVR): This small short line operates about 30 miles of former Southern Pacific trackage between Geer and East Salem, Oregon.  It has been in operation since 1993 and primarily handles forest products.

Pennsylvania Short Line Railroad Guide

Aliquippa & Ohio River Railroad (reporting mark, AOR): The A&OR is another railroad owned by Genesee & Wyoming operating just a short stretch of track (6 miles) north of Pittsburgh with a connection to CSX.  It has been in operation since 2002 although the property's history dates back to Aliquippa & Southern Railroad of 1906 incorporated by the Jones & Laughlin Steel Company to serve its local mill.  It has been G&W-owned since 2008 and hauls aggregates, plastics, and cement.

Allegheny Valley Railroad (reporting mark, AVR):  This short line is one of several owned by Carload Express, Inc. and has been in service since 1992.  It operates 77 miles of former PRR trackage around Pittsburgh and handles a wide range of freight with multiple connects to other carriers including CSX, NS, Buffalo & Pittsburgh, and Wheeling & Lake Erie.

Belvidere & Delaware River Railway (reporting mark, BDRV):  This short line began service in 1995 when it acquired former Conrail trackage in western New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania between West Easton, Phillipsburg, and Milford.

Brandywine Valley Railroad (reporting mark, BVRY):  This short line is located in Coatesville, operating as far as Modena (about 2 miles), and has been in service since 1981.  It has been under various ownership over the years and is currently owned by Mittal Steel serving its local operations.  Interchange is provided through NS.

Buffalo & Pittsburgh Railroad (reporting mark, BPRR): This regional is part of the Genesee & Wyoming's large family of railroads, operating 368 miles of trackage in northwestern Pennsylvania and western New York.  The history of the property dates back to the B&O/BR&P, acquired from CSX in 1988.  It currently serves a multitude of customers moving aggregates, brick/cement, automotive, chemicals, coal, food/feed products, forest products, metallic ores/minerals, and steel/scrap.

Conemaugh & Black Lick Railroad (reporting mark, CBL):  This historic switching/terminal road traces its history back to 1923 and operates about 2 miles of track in the Johnstown area to serve a local steel mill. 

Delaware-Lackawanna Railroad (reporting mark, DL): The DL is operated by Genesee Valley Transportation and owns about 88 miles of railroad in northeastern Pennsylvania. The railroad is famous among railfans for its use of historic Alco diesel locomotives.  It has been in operation since 1993 on trackage formerly owned by the Delaware & Hudson (part of the famed Penn Division) and Delaware, Lackawanna & Western.  It also operates a section of the former Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley, an interurban that disappeared into the DL&W during the 1950s.  Today, the Delaware-Lackawanna's traffic consists of grain, forest products, paper, plastic, clay, steel, petroleum products, chemicals, coal, and aggregates.

East Broad Top Connecting Railroad (reporting mark, EBTC):  This common-carrier short line was initiated in 2014 by the East Broad Top Railroad Preservation Association (EBTPA) to provide freight service on its 4.5 miles of the former East Broad Top dual-gauge trackage running from the Norfolk Southern main line outside of Mount Union to Route 522 in Mount Union/Shirley Township (which includes the old yard).  The new operation will serve a local industrial park and also provide railcar repair services through another subsidiary known as EBT Railcar, LLC.  The hope is to eventually acquire and restore even more of the old EBT to freight operations (and excursions).

East Penn Railroad (reporting mark, ESPN):  This privately-owned short line operates over primarily disconnected branches in southeastern Pennsylvania which also reach into northern Delaware.  The history of the lines trace back to the PRR and Reading, sold by Conrail in the 1990s.  The current road was formed in 2007 through the merger of the East Penn Railway and Penn Eastern Rail Lines.  Currently, it operates 114 miles of track and handles a wide variety of freight.

Everett Railroad (reporting mark, EV):  This short line operates former PRR trackage south of Altoona.  Its current system has been in service since 1984 on two separate lines; one between Brookes Mill and Sproul and the other between Martinsburg and Roaring Spring.  Both branches connect with the Hollidaysburg & Roaring Spring (reporting mark, HRS), an Everett subsidiary.  The H&RS then interchanges with NS at Hollidaysburg.  Its entire system totals about 23 miles.  Traffic consists of grain, agriculture, lumber, pulpwood, paper, manufactured materials, and animal feed.

Gettysburg & Northern Railroad (reporting mark, GET): The Gettysburg & Northern is owned by the Pioneer Rail Corporation and operates a 25-mile railroad between Gettysburg and Mt. Holly Springs on trackage that was formerly part of the Reading.  Its traffic consists of canned goods, pulpboard, soda ash, grain, and scrap paper.

Juniata Valley Railroad (reporting mark, JVRR): This railroad, another owned by the North Shore Railroad Company, began operations in 1996 on trackage (originally PRR) between Lewistown, Burnham, and Maitland. It interchanges with NS at Lewistown and features a livery somewhat similar to that of the Pennsy.

Kiski Junction Railroad (reporting mark, KJR): This short line and tourist railroad began operations in 1995 on former PRR trackage near the city of Pittsburgh.  While the system is an operating short line carrying coal among its other products the company also hosts excursions during various times throughout the year.

Landisville Terminal & Transfer Company (reporting mark, LNVT): This small terminal railroad owns about 2 miles of track near the town of Landisville with a connection to Norfolk Southern.  The system primarily handles agricultural products.

Luzerne & Susquehanna Railway (reporting mark, LSX):  This short line began service in 1994 and today operates about 60 miles between the Wilkes Barre and Scranton areas.  Its traffic has grown steadily over the years and now totals more than 2,000 carloads annually.  It interchanges with Reading & Northern, NS, and Canadian Pacific/Delaware & Hudson.

Lycoming Valley Railroad (reporting mark, LVRR):  The Lycoming Valley is another subsidiary of the North Shore Railroad Company.  It has been in service since August 15, 1996 when it acquired former NYC and Reading branches between Avis and Muncy totaling roughly 48.7 miles.  The road's livery is a version of the Reading's popular green and yellow "Bee Line Service" scheme.  It also hosts excursions on the property. 

Maryland Midland Railway (reporting mark, MMID): This railroad is part of Genesee & Wyoming's large family of short lines and operates a 70 mile system running roughly east-west between Reisterstown and Fort Ritchie.  It also owns a north-south corridor between Woodsboro and Taneytown.  It began service in 1980 as an independent and was acquired by G&W in 2007.  The road handles aggregates, brick/cement, chemicals, and forest products.

Middletown & Hummelstown Railroad (reporting  mark, MIDH):  This popular excursion railroad operating between its namesake towns has been in service since 1976 and is also a freight hauler.  The line first entered service in 1888 carrying the same name but was ultimately acquired by the Reading and operated as a branch.  Under Conrail the trackage was sold creating today's system.  The M&H has connections with NS at both endpoints of its system.

New Castle Industrial Railroad (reporting mark, NCIR):  This terminal/switching road has been in service since 1991 serving customers in the New Castle area utilizing a small fleet of locomotives.

New Hope & Ivyland Railroad (reporting mark, NHRR):  The NH&I is another popular excursion operation that also moves freight.  It began service in 1966 over 16.7 miles of the Reading's former New Hope Branch between New Hope and Warminster.  The railroad has three steam locomotives on-hand although only one, 2-8-0 #40 is currently operational and typically handles excursions while its fleet of diesels pull freight assignments.

Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad (reporting mark, NBER): The N&BE is another North Shore railroad operating between Tyrone (near Altoona) and Lock Haven as well as a branch serving Pleasant Gap and State College. Overall the railroad operates about 82 miles of track and has multiple connections to Norfolk Southern. It began in 1984 by acquiring the property from Conrail that was once a PRR branch.  Its blue and white livery is a nod to Penn State University.

Oil Creek & Titusville Lines (reporting mark, OCTL):  This operation is the freight division of the Oil Creek & Titusville Railroad, an excursion service that utilizes about 16.5 miles of a former PRR branch between Titusville and Rynd Farm.  It has been in service since 1986 when the line was acquired from Conrail.

Lehigh Valley Rail Management (reporting mark, LVRM):  This system acquired the assets of three former short lines and began service on December 30, 2003.  It currently provides switching and terminal service to the towns of Bethlehem and Johnstown. Its total trackage is about 80 miles including all sidings, yards, and spurs.  Aside from switching they also offer transload and intermodal service.

Pennsylvania & Southern Railway (reporting mark, PSCC): This short line is owned by the Raritan Central Railroad and operates between the Cumberland Valley Business Park in Letterkenny to Chambersburg.  The road began service in 2012.

Pennsylvania Southwestern Railroad (reporting mark, PSWR): This short line is a Watco Companies property operating 12 miles west of Midland serving local industries with a connection to NS. It began service on April 1, 2003 and handles primarily steel/scrap products.

Pittsburgh & Ohio Central Railroad (reporting mark, POHC): Another of Genesee & Wyoming's short lines, the P&OC serves the communities located southwest of Pittsburgh along a 35-mile system that was once owned by the PRR and was later part of Ohio Central before being acquired by G&W in 2008.  Its traffic currently consists of chemicals, minerals, plastics and steel.

Pittsburgh, Allegheny & McKees Rocks Railroad (reporting mark, PAM):  This small short line, owned by the McKees Rocks Industrial Enterprise, is based in McKees Rocks and provides switching services for local industries.

Reading, Blue Mountain & Northern Railroad (reporting mark, RBMN):  Often recognized simply as the Reading & Northern, this successful Class II, regional began humbly in September of 1983 when it acquired a 12-mile segment of a former PRR branch between Hamburg and Temple. Since then it has grown prodigiously purchasing former segments of the Reading, Lehigh Valley, and Jersey Central trackage from Conrail that currently provides it an expansive system stretching from Reading to Scranton and several points in between.  The R&N hauls anthracite coal and a variety of other products while also offering excursions to the public via its Lehigh Gorge Scenic Railway in Jim Thorpe.

R.J. Corman Railroad - Allentown Lines (reporting mark, RJCN):  This RJ Corman line has been in service since 1996 when it acquired a former Lehigh Valley branch from Conrail.  Today its property covers 14.5 miles between Allentown and nearby Fullerton.

R.J. Corman Railroad - Pennsylvania Lines (reporting mark, RJCP):  This particular RJ Corman operation began service in 1995 operating 207 miles of trackage between Cresson and Keating.  The property is largely former PRR and NYC secondary branches and it primarily handles coal movements today while other traffic consists of brick, lumber and rock salt.

Shamokin Valley Railroad (reporting mark, SVRR): Another of North Shore's railroads, this short line began service in 1983, operating between Northumberland and Mt. Carmel Junction and connecting with Norfolk Southern, Canadian Pacific, and the Reading & Northern.  It owns 24.7 miles of track that was formerly Reading and PRR property.

Southwestern Pennsylvania Railroad (reporting mark, SWP):  This short line is another subsidiary of Carload Express, Inc. operating 66 miles of trackage between Greensburg and Smithfield.  Located southeast of Pittsburgh the property is former B&O and PRR branches.

Stourbridge Railway (reporting mark, STRY): This shortline operates about 24 miles of former Erie trackage between Honesdale and Lackawaxen Township with a connection to Norfolk Southern located there. It began service on April 1, 1976, the same day as Conrail, and was then known as the  Lackawaxen & Stourbridge Railroad until 1989 when it was changed to the Stourbridge Railroad.  It was then changed again to the Stourbridge Railway in 2009 and the line is currently operated by the Morristown & Erie.

Turtle Creek Industrial Railroad: This small railroad operates between Pittsburgh and Export on 11 miles of track serving local industries. 

Tyburn Railroad (reporting mark, TYBR):  This small short line operates just 1.5 miles of track near Morrisville and interchanges with CSX and NS at Fairless.  It offers transload and switching services as well as rail car storage.

Union County Industrial Railroad (reporting mark, UCIR): This short line is yet another property owned by North Shore operating between Allenwood and Windfield with a connection to NS at Milto.  It totals 20.4 miles and was formerly owned by the Reading and acquired from Conrail in 1995.

Union Railroad (reporting mark, URR):  This historic switching/terminal system has been in service since 1896 providing services in Allegheny County and the Pittsburgh area.  The road has long served the region's steel industry and continues to do so with what remains in operation.  It is currently a division of Transtar, Inc.

York Railway (reporting mark, YRC):  The York Railway operates the remnants of the classic Maryland & Pennsylvania, the fabled Ma & Pa, although the actual trackage is a former PRR branch.  It has been in service since 1999 then-owned by Emons Railroad Group and acquired by G&W in 2002.  It currently operates about 42 miles from Hanover to Stonybrook via York.

Western New York & Pennsylvania Railroad (reporting mark, WNYP):  This privately-owned short line began service in 2001 after acquiring from NS former Erie Southern Tier trackage, and later ex-PRR lines.   It currently operates some 330 miles in northwestern Pennsylvania and western New York, south of Buffalo.  The road serves numerous customers and is known within the railfan community for its use of Alco road-switchers.

Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway (reporting mark, WE): The Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway is a privately owned Class II, regional which has been in operation since 1990 carrying the name of the original W&LE. It operates an extensive system stretching across northern Ohio, West Virginia, and western Pennsylvania with trackage rights reaching Cumberland and Hagerstown.  It operates about 575 miles of its own lines as well as an additional 265 via trackage rights.  The road carries more than 130,000 carloads annually with a highly diversified freight base.

Youngstown & Southeastern Railroad (reporting mark, YSRR): The Y&S is owned by the Indiana Boxcar Corporation and has been in operation since 2006 (formerly operated by the Ohio Central) running between Youngstown, Ohio and Darlington, Pennsylvania, operating about 39 miles.  As of 2014 the property is owned by Mule Sidetracks, LLC and leased to the Y&S for rail service.

Rhode Island Short Line Railroad Guide

Providence & Worcester Railroad (reporting mark, PW):  The P&W is another historic system spun-off following the Penn Central collapse.  It began in 1847, opening its original line between Worcester and Millville, Massachusetts in September that year; a month later it was completed to Providence on October 20th. After nearly 50 years of independence the much large New Haven system leased the railroad for 99 years on July 1, 1892.  After the PC bankruptcy the road regained its independence in early 1973.  Today, it serves more than 140 customers and moves nearly 35,000 carloads annually as a Class II, regional.

Seaview Railroad (reporting mark, SVTX):  This short line is a division of the Seaview Transportation Company.  It connects with the Northeast Corridor in West Davisville and serves numerous businesses at the Quonset Business Park in Davisville with the line splitting to reach the waterfront at North Davisville and Quonset Airport.

South Carolina Short Line Railroad Guide

Carolina Piedmont Railroad (reporting mark, CPDR): This railroad is another of Genesee & Wyoming's large family of short lines. It operates between East Greenville and Laurens, about 34 miles of former ACL property, where it interchanges traffic with CSX.  Its traffic consists of plastics, gas turbines, wind turbines, chemicals, food products, and forest products.

Carolina Southern Railroad (reporting mark, CALA):  This short line began service in 1995 taking over from the Waccamaw Coast Line a former CSX branch between Florence, South Carolina and Wilmington, North Carolina as well as the branch to Myrtle Beach.  The route's history traces back to the Atlantic Coast Line.  It has not seen freight service since 2012 while awaiting repairs to bridges along the route.  However, a potential buyer for the line has been found and service hopes to resume in 2015 following repairs.

East Cooper & Berkeley Railroad (reporting mark, ECBR): This short line, which began service in 1978, operates about 17 miles of track and runs between State Junction and Charity Church with a connection to CSX.   The property is owned by the South Carolina Public Railways Commission and handles primarily steel and chemicals.

Greenville & Western Railway (reporting mark, GRLW): This short line is owned by the Western Carolina Railway Service Corporation and operates right around 13 miles between Belton and Pelzer.  The trackage is former Piedmont & Northern, a highly successful interurban, and began service during October of 2006 when it was acquired from CSX.  The railroad handles about 2,000 carloads annually with traffic including ethanol, scrap metal, limestone, fertilizer, feed products, plastics, and paper.

Hampton & Branchville Railroad (reporting mark, HB): This historic short line operates about 40 miles of track and dates back to 1891 serving the region's timber industry. Today the railroad primarily handles coal (moved to the South Carolina Electric & Gas Company power plant at Canadys) and paper traffic, interchanging with CSX.

Lancaster & Chester Railway (reporting mark, LC):  This historic system dates back to 1873 as a three-foot, narrow-gauge (converted to standard-gauge in 1902), although it acquired its current name in 1896.  Its slogan is The Springmaid Line and it connected its namesake towns.  In 2001 it acquired nearly 31 miles from NS between Catawba and Kershaw providing it a current system of about 60 miles.

Pee Dee River Railway (reporting mark, PDRR):  The Pee Dee River is a division of the Aberdeen & Rockfish, established in October of 1987 to operate 15 miles between McColl and Bennettsville over ex-CSX trackage.  Its customers include Domtar Paper Mill, two Flakeboard Mills, Mohawk Carpet, Hanson Aggregates, and Southern States.

Pickens Railway (reporting mark, PICK):  Another historic South Carolina short line the Pickens Railway dates back to December 24, 1890 when it was chartered by the state, which had stepped in to see the line completed between Pickens and Easley, 9.9 miles.  During the 1990s it added 28.5 miles to its network when it acquired trackage between Anderson, Belton, and Honea Path from NS.  This is currently its remaining system as the original main line was abandoned in 2013.  Its traffic consists of kaolin, limestone, synthetic rubber, rubber processing oil, plastics, silica, scrap metal, paper, scrap paper, bird feed ingredients, farm supplies, and electrical equipment.

Port Terminal Railroad of South Carolina (reporting mark, PTR): Based in the port city of Charleston this terminal railroad operates 10 miles of track serving both the port and nearby industries. It connects directly with CSX and Norfolk Southern.

Port Utilities Commission of Charleston (reporting mark, PUCC): This terminal railroad directly serves the Port of Charleston, operating 10 miles of track that connects with both NS and CSX. 

South Carolina Central Railroad (reporting mark, SCRF):  This short line is another subsidiary of Genesee & Wyoming.  Its history dates back to 1987 when RailTex took over a pair of disconnected lines from CSX between Cheraw and Society Hill as well as between Bishopville and Florence (former SCL and ACL branches).  It handles more than 30,000 carloads annually that includes chemicals, plastics, trash, and other commodities.

South Dakota Short Line Railroad Guide

D&I Railroad (reporting mark, DAIR):  Also known as the Dakota & Iowa Railroad this system is owned by L.G. Everist, Inc.  The short line operates between Sioux City, Iowa and Dell Rapids, South Dakota with a branch to Beresford, South Dakota via Hawarden, Iowa.  The property was all former Milwaukee Road trackage acquired by both states in 1981 to preserve rail service.  The D&I operates a total of 138 miles and handles aggregate, distillers grain, ethanol, agriculture, cement, fertilizer, and other general freight.

Dakota Southern Railway (reporting mark, DSRC):  This short line began service in 1985 when it acquired 190 miles of the former Milwaukee Road between between Marquette, Iowa and Rapid City, South Dakota.  It is currently privately owned and hauls primarily agriculture and grain products.

Ellis & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, EE):  This short line operates between Brandon, South Dakota, through Sioux Falls to Ellis.  It is former Chicago & North Western trackage acquired in 1989 by the Sweetman Construction Company, which still owns the railroad.  Its traffic consists of aggregates and construction materials.

Sisseton- Milbank Railroad (reporting mark, SMRR):  This company is owned by the Twin Cities & Western (since 2012 operating between Milbank and Sisseton on property that was once part of the Milwaukee Road.  Its traffic consists of wheat, corn, soybeans and plastic.

Twin Cities & Western Railroad (reporting mark, TCWR):  This independently-owned short line began service in 1991 acquiring the Soo Line's former Milwaukee Road main line west of the Twin Cities.  Today, the carrier operates about 360 miles in all reaching Granite Falls, Minnesota and Sisseton, South Dakota via the Twin Cities.  Its current traffic base is highly diversified ranging from agriculture to transload services.

Tennessee Short Line Railroad Guide

Caney Fork & Western Railroad (reporting mark, CFWR):  The CF&W has been in service since 1983 when it acquired a section of the former Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis's (later Louisville & Nashville) Sparta Branch from Tullahoma to McMinnville totaling 61 miles.  It is owned by Ironhorse Resources and traffic consists of lumber, steel, fertilizer, grain, propane, and carbon black.

Chattanooga & Chickamauga Railway (reporting mark, CCKY): The C&C is part of Genesee & Wyoming's vast collection of short lines and operates between Lyerly, Georgia and Chattanooga via the former Central of Georgia's Chattanooga Division.  The line is about 49 miles in length and its traffic includes chemicals, metals and plastics.

East Chattanooga Belt Railway (reporting mark, ECTB): This terminal/switching railroad serves the local area of Chattanooga owns about 4 miles of track. The railroad is operated by the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum and usually carries less than 100 carloads annually which includes paper, metals, and chemicals.

East Tennessee Railway (reporting mark, ETRY):  This short line is another division of Genesee & Wyoming.  Its trackage dates back to the fabled East Tennessee & Western North Carolina ("The Tweetsie") with the only remaining section running 5 miles east of Johnson City.  The railroad began in 1983 when the property was acquired by the Green Bay Packaging Company and changed to the ET&WNC name as the East Tennessee Railway.  It was acquired by G&W in 2005 and traffic consists of chemicals, food/feed products, forest products, and steel/scrap.

Heritage Railroad (reporting mark, HRC):  This small short line is operated by Energy Solutions, LLC and operates about a 11.5 miles near Oak Ridge formerly owned by the U.S. Department of Energy.  It has been in operation since 1997 and traffic includes radioactive waste and heavy equipment.

Knoxville & Holston River Railroad (reporting mark, KXHR):  The Knoxville & Holtson is a Gulf & Ohio short line operating about 20 miles and began service in 1998.  It operates between Knoxville and Marbledale but is best known amongst the public as hosting the Three Rivers Rambler train rides.

Kentucky West Tennessee Railway (reporting mark, KWT): The KWT Railway operates a 69-mile system of unconnected lines, mostly in northwestern Tennessee, which also reaches Murray, Kentucky.  The road has been a G&W property since 2005 and hauls brick, clay, and food/feed products.

Nashville & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, NERR):  The Nashville & Eastern operates 110 miles of the historic Tennessee Central Railway between Nashville and Monterey.  It began service in 1986 and today hosts the Music City Star commuter rail service between Nashville and Lebanon, which began operations in 2006.

Nashville & Western Railroad (reporting mark, NWR):  This short line is under common ownership with the Nashville & Eastern running between Nashville and Ashland City.  It began service in 2000 and operates about 18 miles of track.

Sequatchie Valley Railroad (reporting mark, SQVR): This railroad just penetrates Alabama's northern region and is mostly located in Tennessee running from Kimball, Tennessee to Bridgeport, Alabama.  Its origins can be traced back to a carrier by the same but was for many years leased by the NC&StL.  It handles about 1,500 carloads annually with freight including plastics and lumber.

Tennken Railroad (reporting mark, TENK):  The Tennken began service in 1983 when local governments in Kentucky rescued the former Illinois Central Gulf main line between Dyersburg, Tennessee and Hickman, Kentucky that was slated for abandonment in 1981.  The trackage is about 51 miles in length and the road's traffic includes coiled steel, steel pipe, petroleum coke, electro binder, plastics, synthetic resin, carbon black, fertilizer, and grain with carloads totaling more than 4,000 annually.

Tennessee Southern Railroad (reporting mark TSRR):  This short line is owned by Patriot Rail and operates primarily in Tennessee from Natco and Pulaski as well as southeasterly to Florence, Alabama.  It operates about 118 miles in all handling several thousand carloads annually with freight including scrap iron, coal, coke, woodpulp, pulp-board, sand, chemicals, steel, aluminum, and fertilizer raw materials.

Walking Horse & Eastern Railroad (reporting mark, WHOE):  This small short line operates about 8 miles of former NC&StL/L&N property between Shelbyville and Wartrace.  It has been in service since 1985 while the trackage is owned by the Bedford Railroad Authority.

West Tennessee Railroad (reporting mark, WTNN):  This short line has been in service since 1984 utilizing the former Gulf, Mobile & Ohio main line between Jackson and Kenton, Tennessee.  In 2001 it expanded operations by leasing from NS the former GM&O to Corinth, Mississippi as well as the ex-Illinois Central to Fulton, Kentucky.  Today, the road handles a variety of freight including agriculture, petroleum products, packaging material, paper, lumber, propane, and other products.

Texas Short Line Railroad Guide

Angelina & Neches River Railroad

Austin Western Railroad

Blacklands Railroad

Border Pacific Railroad: Headquartered in Rio Grande City, Texas.

Corpus Christi Terminal: Located at the Port of Corpus Christi.

Dallas, Garland & Northeastern Railroad

Fort Worth & Western Railroad

Galveston Railroad: P. O. Box 1108, 37th and Old Industrial Blvd., Galveston, Texas.

GWI Switching Services: Headquartered in Dayton, Texas.

Panhandle Northern Railway

Point Comfort & Northern Railway: Headquartered in Lolita, Texas.

Rockdale, Sandow & Southern Railroad: Headquartered in Rockdale, Texas.

Texas Central Business Lines: Headquartered in Waxahachie, Texas.

Timber Rock Railroad

Wichita, Tillman & Jackson Railway

Utah Short Line Railroad Guide

Deseret Western Railway

Salt Lake Garfield & Western Railway: Headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Utah Railway

Vermont Short Line Railroad Guide

Vermont Rail System

Virginia Short Line Railroad Guide

Bay Coast Railroad: Located in Cape Charles, Virginia.

Buckingham Branch Railroad

Commonwealth Railway: 1136 Progress Road, Suffolk, Virginia 23434

Norfolk & Portsmouth Belt Line Railroad

Virginia Southern Railroad

Winchester & Western Railroad



Apache Railway C424 #98 and C420 #82 head southbound for Snowflake, Arizona some time during 2006.

Washington Short Line Railroad Guide

Bountiful Grain & Craig Mountain Railroad

Tacoma Rail

Tri-City & Olympia Railroad

West Virginia Short Line Railroad Guide

West Virgina Southern Railroad: Part of the RJ Corman System, operates a coal branch near Thurmond, West Virginia.

Little Kanawha River

South Branch Valley

West Virginia Central

Wisconsin Short Line Railroad Guide

Tomahawk Railway: Headquartered in Tomahawk, Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Northern Railroad (reporting mark, WN):  This road is headquartered in Lakeville and operates as a subsidiary of Progressive Rail.  It first began service in 1996 and currently runs between Chippewa Falls and Sand House, Wisconsin over trackage originally owned by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha (later, C&NW).

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